Thursday, Dec 03, 2020
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 43 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, October 19, 2018 - Volume 46 Issue 42
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
Pulpy Bad Times a violently retro slice of noir-soaked ambiguity
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

BAD TIMES AT THE EL ROYALE
Now playing


On the border of California and Nevada sits the El Royale, a rundown hotel where guests can choose to stay in whichever state that suits their sensibilities. On a cold January night in 1969 a group of disparate characters find themselves at this perpetually empty locale. There's the cocksure vacuum salesman Laramie Seymour Sullivan (Jon Hamm), eager to use his expense account to stay in the swanky bridal suite on the California side of the hotel. Also, there is the friendly Father Daniel Flynn (Jeff Bridges), interested in staying in the Nevada section but unable to choose which cabin, four or five, that he would prefer. Also joining him in the Battle Born State are the quiet R&B singer Darlene Sweet (Cynthia Erivo) as well as an angrily aggressive woman (Dakota Johnson) who refuses to write her name in the registry. All together it's the largest group of customers hotel clerk Miles Miller (Lewis Pullman) has seen in quite some time, and to say they have him jittery would be understating the obvious.

Nothing is what it seems. Father Daniel wants to find a specific room for a reason. Laramie Seymour Sullivan's gigantic vacuum case doesn't actually contain a display model but only the facsimile of one. The nameless visitor has another, slightly younger woman she keeps referring to as 'Ruth' (Cailee Spaeny) tied to a chair in her room. As for Darlene, she's really the only one content to be who she actually is, transforming her own room into a makeshift studio in order to practice for an upcoming show in Reno. But even she has a secret hiding in her past, one that she's worried if anyone were to find out about she'd potentially never work as a singer ever again.

This is only the tip of the iceberg as far as the convoluted pulp fiction noir aesthetics of writer/director Drew Goddard's Bad Times at the El Royale are concerned. A follow-up to The Martian and Cloverfield screenwriter's 2012 directorial debut The Cabin in the Woods, this change of pace effort is a convoluted tale of moral and societal degradation only told at epic length yet still primarily set inside one isolated central locale. It is a treatise on what people are willing to do to survive, what they will give up to get ahead and the sacrifices they will make in order to do the right thing. It is a story of forgiveness and faith, of resilience and honesty. Most of all it is just a giant mélange of human wreckage attempting to either repair itself or tear additional limbs off of an already mutilated torso, the physical and psychological scars of violence begetting more of the same as events spiral out of control.

It's a cruel movie. There's no denying that. Goddard takes no prisoners, and just as soon as I was starting to become curious about a character or wonder what it was they were going to try and do next suddenly they would be dispatched with a cold, almost callous indifference that left me gasping for air. Just as suddenly the director would circle around and view important events from an entirely different point of view. Almost as quickly he would do so again, in a way crafting a circular Rashomon where the truth of a situation can only be surmised after viewing every angle of the event in as meticulous a fashion as possible. It's masterfully executed, Goddard handling it all with an assured confidence that's astonishing.

But this also means the story can be painfully drawn out. It takes time to look at so many various events from multiple points of view, even more so when the director allows each scene to move at its own individualistic pace. Goddard and cinematographer Seamus McGarvey (Anna Karenina, Atonement) stage a plethora of exquisitely intimate tracking shots that, as masterful as they might be, also call attention to themselves for their inherent theatricality. It's a double-edged sword, this technical virtuosity also stalling out the narrative on more than one occasion.

Yet, when Bad Times at the El Royale is glorious it is magnificently so. The story weaves in and out in ways that combine the best of Quentin Tarantino, Samuel Fuller, Robert Altman, Dashiell Hammett, Mickey Spillane and Raymond Chandler with absurdist aplomb. Better, Goddard allows his talented cast the freedom to explore their characters in any number of wildly eccentric and morally complicated ways. As such, by the time the survivors make it to the final act, even if they were beyond salvation, I still found myself caring about whether they would live or die, the emotional investment I felt as the story went down the home stretch well beyond my initial expectations.

Bridges is his superlative self, allowing the secrets Father Flynn is trying to hide to rise to the surface with an intuitive mutability that suits his character perfectly. Erivo is even better. Her Darlene is a determinedly soulful iconoclast who is filled with far more inner strength, and even more innate goodness, then she realizes. The way the singer responds to Father Flynn's truths when they are revealed to her captured my attentions in their entirety, Erivo giving these moments an arresting authenticity that knocked me cold. Johnson is also wonderful, but the less said about her mysterious character the better, while Pullman is close to spectacular as Miller searches for salvation and absolution while at the same time trying to put his actions on the ground in Vietnam far behind him as he does so.

Then there is Chris Hemsworth. He's playing a charismatic California cult leader known as Billy Lee, and while Goddard shows glimpses of him throughout the first two-thirds, one can't help but wait in constant anticipation eager for this man to arrive at the El Royale and become an actual physical presence inside the story. When he finally does materialize it proves to have been well worth the wait. Hemsworth saunters and slinks his way into the center of the frame, his masculine gravitas oozing a type of dangerous magnetism that I couldn't ignore. He takes over so completely he almost cripples the film as it's hard to maintain interest in anyone else whenever he's on the screen. And yet, Billy Lee is just another piece of the puzzle, and when things finally explode seeing the carnage he's left in his wake turns out to be one of the major points of emphasis Goddard has been so carefully building towards.

I'm admittedly being vague about a lot of this on purpose. I don't want to talk about the secrets of the hotel or the things that have made Miller such a shell of a person. I'm not speaking about the marvelous prologue that sets the template for much of what is to follow, and I'm not about to reveal who Johnson's character is and why Ruth means so much to her. Goddard has a lot going on and for the most part he's able to keep all of these varying dramatic balls in the air successfully, rarely losing sight of where he wants to go while at the same time serving up an engaging and entertaining story audiences will hopefully thrill over.

If they will or not I have no idea. The marketing for the film has sold Goddard's opus as some sort of lean, mean noir-drenched suspense flick filled with pulpy mayhem and bloody chaos, and while those last two items certainly exist, they do so in the context of a character-driven opus unafraid to take its time and develop things slowly. For my part, I really enjoyed Bad Times at the El Royale even when I got angry at it for callously killing off a character or two that I'd started to have affection for. But this is still a nifty little ultraviolent throwback I'm eager for audiences to get a look at, their various reactions, whether they be positive, negative or somewhere in-between, certain to provoke wildly divergent discussions worthy of further conversation.


Emotionally byzantine Hate U Give easy to love
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE HATE U GIVE
Now playing


After witnessing her childhood friend Khalil (Algee Smith) fatally shot by a police officer during a late-night traffic stop, 16-year-old Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg) is unsure of what the right thing to do is. Her father, Maverick (Russell Hornsby), is a reformed gang member who after serving time in prison now owns and operates a respected grocery store in their small, close-knit community of Garden Heights. Her mother, Lisa (Regina Hall), is a nurse at the local hospital, while her older half-brother Seven (Lamar Johnson) and younger brother Sekani (TJ Wright) help round out the family. Together, they all know Starr is under immense pressure and that ultimately it is her decision alone whether or not she wants to go public as being the only eye-witness to this horrific incident.

There are complications, not the least of which is that, in order to keep them out of trouble and ensure they'll get the best education, Maverick and Lisa ship their three kids to an upper-class, predominately white private school about forty minutes away from their home. Starr doesn't want to stand out to her classmates as the 'poor kid from the projects,' and coming forward publicly outside the anonymity of the Grand Jury would mean doing just that. More pressingly, she also doesn't want to anger Garden Heights' most powerful drug lord, King (Anthony Mackie), her father's former best friend who also just happened to be employing Khalil as well. Even though the tragic traffic stop had nothing to do with King's business, and even though the young man was unarmed and didn't do anything to warrant being shot, Starr knows uttering the criminal's name out loud could make her and her family a target for the drug runner's goons, and the thought she could put any of them in jeopardy, no matter how selfless her intentions might be, gives her understandable nightmares.

Based on the novel by Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give is one heck of a motion picture. The late Audrey Wells (Under the Tuscan Sun, Guinevere) has composed a screenplay that is richly complex, intelligently nuanced and subtly introspective, Starr's story an operatic tour de force that grows in intensity as the teenager achieves an even greater sense of purpose while discovering a titanic inner strength she never knew she possessed. An undeniable triumph for director George Tillman Jr., a filmmaker who has long flirted with greatness with films like Soul Food, Men of Honor and Notorious yet has sadly never achieved it, this movie is a compelling punch to the gut.

There's a lot to unpack. The glory of this adaptation is that it seldom preaches. While Tillman and Wells do have to spend a lot of time having Starr or Maverick, or in some cases the teenager's police officer uncle Carlos (Common) or determined civil rights attorney April Ofrah (Issa Rae), explain rather succinctly and in no uncertain terms what is currently going on or what a particular group of people might be thinking at any given moment, these passages of exposition still feel natural, still come across as affectingly authentic. There are few occasion where melodrama overwhelms the situation, the filmmakers instead allowing the inherent emotions swirling within this cultural, social and personal maelstrom to bubble to the surface at their own organic pace. Little is forced on the audience, and if not for a few instances of coincidence utilized to amplify the tension of the situations Starr and her family find themselves dealing with, there is a precision to the film's narrative progression that's just about perfect.

Tillman and Wells could easily have beaten the audience over the head with didactic forcefulness. They could have chosen to preach instead of trusting the viewer to put all of these various bits and pieces together for themselves. They could have stuffed their points about social injustice, white privilege, gender disparity and political indifference down everyone's throats and called it a day. Yet the two filmmakers refuse to do that. While not entirely free of a heavy hand, even the instances where Tillman might bring down his gavel just a little bit more forcefully than he needed to (most notably whenever he's focusing on the subplot involving King) still reverberate through the theatre with authority. It's a fascinating balancing act, and as difficult to watch as things became there was never a moment I wanted to pull my eyes from the screen. Not one.

A lot of this has to do with how warm, affectionate, loving and downright funny the film frequently is. This is a tough situation. The painfully tragic undertones fueling this complex drama are undeniable. But grief and comedy are almost always intertwined, and Wells' script fearlessly allows laughter to fill the dark void at any number of surprising occasions. She also isn't afraid to let her characters get angry or to be afraid. She lets them show how uncertain they are of their own feelings, the script treating indecision as an agonizing fact of life and not a trait to be ridiculed, diminished or most of all ignored.

Known to most as Rue from The Hunger Games, even though I didn't care for Everyone, Everyone or this past summer's The Darkest Minds, I've been saying for a while now just how terrific an actress Stenberg is fast becoming. Here, as Starr, she magnificently comes into her own. This is a bravura performance, and I could feel each and every inch of her emotional journey as the young woman struggled to figure out what she wanted to do. Stenberg cuts to straight to the truth with shattering minimalist brevity, and I was often caught off guard by how she could transition through so many varied states of being with such unvarnished intimacy. The actress crushed my heart and uplifted my spirits while also breaking me down to tears at the drop of a hat, and as unforgettable characters go Starr has vaulted near the top of my 2018 list entirely thanks to her.

The rest of the cast is also exceptional, most notably Hornsby, the passionate depth of his performance busting stereotypes and perceptions in ways that deserve to be discovered fresh and without any spoilers from me. There is also a deft, understated turn from K.J. Apa as Starr's clueless boyfriend Chris that charmed the socks right off of me, while Sabrina Carpenter had a couple of moments as her private school classmate and supposed best friend Hailey that shook me senseless. Unsurprisingly, Hall is also superb, and while she could likely play a role like Lisa in her sleep that does not mean she brings any less maternal conviction or undiluted parental authority to her performance whatsoever.

There's so much more I could say, but ultimately I feel like The Hate U Give has to be experienced knowing as little about what is going to happen or how each character is going to interact with the others as possible. Tillman and Wells have transformed Thomas' source material into something urgently important, yes, but even better they've also managed to make one heck of an entertaining motion picture. See this one immediately.


Michael Myers and Laurie Strode return in Halloween
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

HALLOWEEN
Now playing


On Halloween night in 1978, teenager Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) survived an attack from escaped mental patient Michael Myers (Nick Castle) while babysitting. Her friends were not so fortunate. All told Michael murdered five people before his psychiatrist Dr. Loomis put six bullets into him only for him to somehow survive and get re-incarcerated back inside the Smith's Grove sanitarium, and ever since that terrifying evening Laurie has been methodically making plans in case this unholy force of nature were to break free of his chains and return back to Haddonfield to finish what he started 40 years prior.

That night is tonight. It is again Halloween and Michael has escaped captivity. Much to the annoyance of her daughter Karen (Judy Greer) it's just this eventuality Laurie has been preparing for. She's determined to end Michael's reign of terror. But when her granddaughter Allyson (Andi Matichak) becomes caught in the crossfire, Laurie must rethink her plan. Not that this matters to Michael. He's determined to kill everyone he encounters, his eventual confrontation with the only victim to have escaped his knife many years ago something he's been silently waiting for ever since that night came to its violent conclusion.

There's a lot to unpack as it pertains to director David Gordon Green's direct sequel to John Carpenter's timeless 1978 horror classic Halloween. The most pertinent thing to know? It's the first entry in the long-running series of slasher films featuring Myers where Carpenter has been actively involved since 1981's Halloween II. But in that case he and co-creator, screenwriter and frequent collaborator Debra Hill didn't really want to continue the story of Michael Myers and Laurie Strode, their ideas about where to take the Halloween franchise next far different than what the studio had in mind. They had visions of creating something that's familiar to today's moviegoers but unthinkable in the 1980s and that's the idea of a 'shared universe.' Signing on to write, produce and score Halloween II allowed the two the freedom to make 1982's Halloween III: Season of the Witch. But with its box office failure Carpenter appeared to be resigned to being finished with the franchise for good, content to pick up a series of residual checks from the various studios that have greenlit sequels and reboots over these past four decades.

The next thing to know is that, with Carpenter's blessing, Green and his co-writers Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley have taken the Myers/Strode story back to the beginning. Gone are all of the sequels, and not just the Laurie-less entries Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers and Halloween 5, but also the films Curtis did appear in, most notably the aforementioned Halloween II and 1998's Halloween H20. None of them exist in the newest incarnation of the story, things picking up 40 years later with Laurie a recluse still suffering from PTSD with two failed marriages, a daughter who seldom speaks to her and a granddaughter she frustratingly seldom gets to see while Michael remains incarcerated in Smith's Grove under the supervision of Dr. Loomis' protégé Dr. Sartain (Haluk Bilginer). All that other stuff? It's gone, erased from the timeline, Green and company returning the story to its roots as outlined by Carpenter and Hill back in 1978.

Green proves, somewhat surprisingly, to be an inspired choice to pull this off. This is because, not only does he trust in Carpenter and Hill's original conceit, but also thanks to his feel for intimate interpersonal minutia which his work on such films as George Washington, Joe, Prince Avalanche and Snow Angels has made abundantly clear. He makes a point to put character dynamics first ahead of all the blood, gore, violence and mayhem, grounding this new chapter in Laurie's story in issues regarding post-traumatic stress, how violence begets violence, parental neglect and how the pursuit of vengeance can irrevocably stain everything it touches. He makes the relationship triangle between Laurie, Karen and Allyson the heartfelt, painfully emotional soul of the story, their collective pursuit of reconciliation, understanding and even forgiveness the most important aspect of the tale.

Additionally, he and his co-writers return Michael Myers to being 'The Shape.' Described so memorably by Donald Pleasance's Dr. Loomis in the 1978 original as 'purely and simply...evil,' that is what he has become here once again. There is no rhyme to what Michael is doing. There is no reason. As obsessed as Dr. Sartain becomes in trying to ascertain what it is that fuels Michael's actions the truth is that he refuses to believe what Dr. Loomis proclaimed and that is, as human as he looks, the physical body is only an empty shell, mindless violence and mayhem the only traits living within. This returns Michael to his terrifying status as an unstoppable bogeyman, and so the thought anyone could die, no matter who they are or how important or insignificant to the story they might be, exists from the moment he escapes Smith's Grove to the second he and Laurie once again face one another down one-on-one.

Some of the plotting is a little contrived to the point of being silly. The narrative leaps in logic required to get all three Strode women out to Laurie's isolated fortress as well as making sure Michael ends up there as well are fairly ludicrous. Additionally, the construct of having a pair of British journalists (Rhian Rees, Jefferson Hall) inadvertently be the instigators for Michael's latest killing spree is rather laughable, and if not for the total commitment of the two actors during the expected moment when they realize the monster they've come to research cannot be studied I doubt I'd have cared about either of them whatsoever. The film also wastes a delicately balanced performance from veteran character actor Will Patton as a Haddonfield police officer who was there 40 years earlier when Michael's first night of carnage came to an end. He's excellent, but the story doesn't seem to know what to do with him, and the way his character is ultimately dealt with comes perilously close to being inexcusable.

No matter. Greer is wonderful, her Karen having far more layers and emotional complexity than it initially appears, Green allowing her to play things close to the vest until the precise moment she's no longer required to do so. Newcomer Matichak is also quite good, and I loved the authenticity of all the scenes between Allyson and her high school friends. It's apparent the filmmakers went out of their way to study that aspect of Carpenter's original, each teenager a fully-formed, realistic human being, and as such when some of them meet their end at Michael's hand the overall weight of their demise is bone-chilling.

Yet, in what will likely come as no shock to anyone, Curtis is the true draw here, and much like she did in Halloween H20 she does not disappoint in her return to the character that launched her career. Laurie continues to fit the actress like a glove. She slips inside of her with ease, the depths of pathos and pain bubbling within instantly palpable. Curtis crafts a performance that is devastating in its little nuances, watching her remain committed to her family no matter what the cost while at the same time battling those internal demons left by Michael's knife back when she was still a senior in high school gut-wrenching in their intimacy. It's a bravura performance that goes well beyond the expected, the levels of angst and grief coupling with a form of selflessly naked empathy are continually moving in their fascinating specificity.

There are the requisite callbacks to the original Halloween. There are also some rather nice bits of homage paid to both Halloween II as well as Halloween III: Season of the Witch. Carpenter, working with his son Cody Carpenter and musician Daniel A. Davies (Condemned), delivers a kick-butt score that stands out on its own outside of his iconic work for the 1978 film. As for Michael Simmonds' (The Lunchbox) menacing, methodically propulsive cinematography, the layering of darkness, shadow and light is exceptional, and while it does call to mind Dean Cundey's spectacular work on the original, the uncomfortably lush layering of the images give the material a unique imprint that's unnervingly glorious.

The same can be said for Green's Halloween. It respects Carpenter's film. It understands it, following in its footsteps with confidence. But the filmmaker has also made his own movie, told his own story, infusing it with a powerful, almost mournful grace that transcends generations as it becomes its own primal, expressively resonant thing. This next chapter of the story is undeniably its own distinctive thing, Michael and Laurie's return to greatness as thrillingly bloodcurdling as it is joyfully welcome.


Heartrending The Guilty a breathlessly tense real-time thriller
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE GUILTY
Now playing


On desk duty until an investigation into one of his prior cases reaches a conclusion, veteran police officer Asger Holm (Jakob Cedergren) is doing his best to get through the remaining hours of his shift covering the Emergency Services phone line. But with his day drawing to a close and the strong likelihood he'll be returned to active duty in the morning, the seasoned investigator receives a call that forces him to reevaluate everything he thought he knew about law enforcement. A woman, pretending to be speaking with her six-year-old daughter, has called Emergency Services to let the police know she's been kidnapped and is deathly afraid for her life, only giving Asger the most basic and nondescript information about her whereabouts and who has her before being forced to hang up the phone.

Putting back on his detective hat, the police officer is determined to figure out who this woman is, who it is that has her and the location of their final destination. Asger begins to look at this case as a way for him to redeem himself for past mistakes, even going so far as to promise to the woman's daughter he'll make sure her mother comes back alive even though any outcome, let alone that one, is far outside his personal control. Trapped in the Emergency Services call center, the officer attempts to put the pieces of this abduction puzzle together utilizing the only weapon he has at his disposal: the phone. But as Asger helps outside units close in on the woman and her abductor he also begins to question whether or not he's let his emotions get the better of him, wondering if he's doing more harm than good by being so proactive in going beyond the call of duty his present job at Emergency Services typically calls for.

Denmark's official submission for the Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award, director Gustav Möller's lean, mean psychological thriller The Guilty is perfect. Featuring a sensational lead performance from Cedergren, this intimate marvel is a suspense-filled shocker that builds to an explosively emotional climax that had me choking back tears as it delivered one gut-wrenching punch to the gut after another. Taking place entirely inside the Emergency Services call center and with only minimal input from the supporting cast, this is as focused and as meticulously plotted a real-time thriller as any I've ever seen, at least since Steven Knight's 2013 Tom Hardy gem Locke. Make no mistake, this is one of 2018's best motion pictures.

It's entirely self-contained with only one primary set with two separate rooms. The first is the larger call center where Asger first receives the initial cry for help. The second is a smaller office where Emergency Services officers can take any of the more challenging calls in relative seclusion. Möller transitions between each room with kinetic efficiency, cinematographer Jasper J. Spanning's camerawork achieving an effortlessly elegant dynamism that only amplifies the emotional upheavals Asger is forced to deal with whether he wants to or not. The film is also edited by Carla Luffe as if the entire drama were resting on the edge of a freshly sharpened knife, tension ratcheting up bit by bit as events steamroll towards their inherently devastating conclusion.

Cedergren is magnificent. With only a small handful of other officers in the call center, the actor spends most of his time either interacting with others over the phone or sitting in the office alone as he aggressively tries to figure out what he needs to do next in order to ensure this woman survives the night and he can keep his promise to her child. Cedergren does a superb job of letting his internalized emotions burst forth little by little as he learns more about what is going on and gets closer to helping facilitate this kidnapped caller's escape. It's a wonderful bit of creative dexterity, the pure physicality of what he's called on to accomplish far more difficult than it might initially appear. It all builds to a moment of profound, unfiltered honesty that is both heroic and damning all in the same breath, watching Cedergren during this moment leaving me more than a bit shell-shocked by the time it came to an end.

Ultimately, The Guilty isn't the suspense-thriller a viewer might imagine it is going to be. Sure it is tense, and without question the central conceit of an Emergency Services phone operator working against time to help facilitate the rescue of a kidnapped woman is unnerving. But as great as all of that might be, and it is magnificent, Möller and his co-writer Emil Nygaard Albertsen have crafted something much more intimate, far more human than I anticipated. It asks tough questions about right and wrong that straddle the line between good and evil with heartrending clarity, and no matter how selflessly pure the act innocence and guilt still mix via an uneasy symbiotic relationship with neither attribute able to exist without the companionship of its polar opposite counterpart.




Seattle Opera's Turn of the Screw a chilling psychological thriller
------------------------------
SGN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS: Harvey Fierstein's acclaimed Casa Valentina at Erickson Theatre Oct 19-28
------------------------------
A Thousand Splendid Suns is a stunning work of art
------------------------------
Seattle Women's Chorus is making jubilant noise
------------------------------
Seattle Opera goes full Hitchcock with The Turn of the Screw
------------------------------
Come From Away still a fun and uplifting show
------------------------------
Seattle Humane - Pets of the Week
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
An open letter to the community on the Kavanaugh appointment from GSBA President and CEO Louise Chernin
------------------------------

------------------------------
Pulpy Bad Times a violently retro slice of noir-soaked ambiguity
------------------------------
Emotionally byzantine Hate U Give easy to love
------------------------------
Michael Myers and Laurie Strode return in Halloween
------------------------------
Heartrending The Guilty a breathlessly tense real-time thriller
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2018 - DigitalTeamWorks 2018

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News