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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, September 28, 2018 - Volume 46 Issue 39
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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Funny and cathartic, Gilda a spellbinding love letter to a comedy legend
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

LOVE, GILDA
Now playing


Gilda Radner was a celebrity my parents could agree on. Not that either of them ever really said out loud she was their favorite comedian or anything. But even as a little kid I could still tell. Both of them would randomly break out with a line of hers as Roseanne Roseannadanna or Lisa Loopner at random moments that always struck me as bizarre. We also went to see The Woman in Red and Haunted Honeymoon at the drive-in mainly because she was in both of them, and as much as we all enjoyed Young Frankenstein and Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory I can't exactly say my mom and dad were head over heels for Gene Wilder. She was the draw. It was obvious, and even if I doubt either of my parents would remember any of this now, all of this is nonetheless burned into my memory as if it were yesterday.

All of those memories and more came flooding back like a massive tsunami while I was watching director Lisa D'Apolito's remarkable documentary Love, Gilda. Given unparalleled access to the iconic actress and comedian's home movies and personal diaries, this is a story told almost entirely via its subject's own words. While D'Apolito does interview a flock of individuals who knew her best, including fellow 'Saturday Night Live' alumni Chevy Chase, Laraine Newman and Paul Shaffer, it is the voice of Radner herself that resonates most. From her early days just starting out working with the likes of Martin Short, to her time on 'SNL,' to her groundbreaking one-woman Broadway show, to her love affair and marriage to Wilder, which was sadly quickly followed by her tragic battle against cancer and the publication of her best-selling memoir It's Always Something, she talks about all of it.

It's fairly extraordinary, D'Apolito's film a stunning chronicle of one of the 20th century's most remarkable talents who trail-blazed her way through a misogynistic, male-dominated industry like few others before her had been able to accomplish. More, Radner forged a path a whole army of female comics have been building upon and expanding ever since, and to see so many of them appear here reading from her journals, and so clearly emotional at being given the opportunity to do so, is continually incredible. Everything is here in one way or another, the director craftily building a story of a singular life that's continually striving for more and in the process manufacturing a saga of triumph, regret, tragedy and courage that's universal in its breadth, scope and emotional resonance.

I find it interesting that this film is coming out now. Right in the heart of the #TimesUp and #MeToo movements, at the time when Frances McDormand is standing on the Oscar stage shouting, 'inclusion rider' for all the world to hear and essentially putting every Hollywood studio on instantaneous notice, with political, corporate and social worlds being rocked by one scandal after another, here is a story of a talented woman who had to fight for everything she achieved all the while being told every step of the way she just wasn't as smart or as talented as the men she happened to be standing next to in front of a global audience each and every week. To D'Apolito's credit, she doesn't shout about the parallels between then and now, instead once again allowing Radner herself to do all the heavy lifting for her. This gives her documentary a vitality and an urgency it likely never would have obtained had the director been more didactic or heavy-handed in her approach, all of which gives the film another emotional level to rise to that will likely take many audience members by surprise.

But this is Radner's story. Even if one isn't as familiar with her achievements as one would hope they would be (she died back in 1989, after all), it's crystal clear after watching D'Apolito's opus why so many of today's most accomplished entertainers, people like Amy Poehler, Melissa McCarthy, Bill Hader and Maya Rudolph look up to her with such adoration. Not just for her work on 'SNL.' Not just for her Broadway triumphs. Not just for her scene-stealing performances in Hanky Panky and The Woman in Red. Not just for her autobiography or her life-saving work being a figurehead in the battle against cancer which led to the founding of a number of Gilda's Clubs throughout the United States. They admire her for all of it, every step of that journey, Radner's story one people of all backgrounds, genders and ethnicities can look at for inspiration.

It is that aforementioned universality that ends up making Love, Gilda so magnificent. After watching, I couldn't help but be instantly reminded as to why my parents loved Radner as much as they did. Better, D'Apolito has made a movie that will introduce the legendary comedy firebrand to a potential new audience of youngsters who will be blown away by her whip-smart brilliance. No joke, this is one of 2018's best documentaries, and I hope viewers of all types take the time to give it a look the second it becomes available for them to do so.


Sadistically satirical Nation violently assassinates the patriarchy
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

ASSASSINATION NATION
Now playing


In the town of Salem, high school seniors Lily (Odessa Young), Bex (Hari Nef), Em (Abra) and Sarah (Suki Waterhouse) have somehow become the most hated quartet of teenagers in all of America. Their small, conservatively close-knit community is in the middle of a total meltdown, a mysterious hacker disclosing over half of the population's secrets on the Internet for the world to see. For a variety of reasons, these four young women have become the focal point for all of Salem's fear, hysteria and anger. When the rule of law breaks down, the four friends are forced to take violent action in order to defend themselves, choosing to fight back against the violent delusions of members of their community who are for some reason psychotically determined to wipe the very existence of these teenagers off the face of the earth.

Audiences sitting down to watch writer/director Sam Levinson's (Another Happy Day) sophomore outing can't say the film doesn't give them fair notice in regards to what it is they are about to watch. An opening montage highlights all of the movie's aggressively satirical ambitions, going through a long list of 'Trigger Warnings' including hot-button topics like bullying, classism, toxic masculinity, homophobia, transphobia, nationalism, racism, the male gaze, sexism, torture, violence, gore and the fragile male ego. This is a movie that is going to dive deeply into the raging societal hypocrisies lurking right at the center of modern Americana, doing so in a way that will be decidedly uncomfortable for viewers who decide to give it a look, especially men.

In particular, conservative-leaning white men. Levinson's drama is unapologetically feminist, looking at male privilege through a liberal-leaning lens that's obvious throughout. Most of the guys who play a major part of this story cannot handle having their fragile egos attacked, and even though it's their own actions that have been put under the microscope they're still unwilling to take responsibility for anything they've done. Instead, they find ways to blame others for their missteps, most notably by putting Lily, Bex, Em and Sarah in the condemnatory crosshairs the citizens of Salem find more palatable than being forced to deal with unpleasant truths. They deflect and come up with excuses for their actions, embracing a holier-than-though sanctimony that's transparently insincere.

Not that Levinson lets his heroes off the hook. These ladies aren't perfect angels. They're navigating the complicated waters of high school dealing with a world so reliant upon social media that each Twitter tweet, Facebook post or image uploaded to Instagram could have a wide variety of unforeseen repercussions that might change the course of a person's life forever. They can be selfish. They can be vain. They can let their own personal self-interests influence their actions in ways that impact others negatively. They drink, cuss and experiment with sex and drugs with enthusiastic gusto, never thinking any of their actions could come back and haunt them later on.

But here's the thing. They're not doing anything that their fellow male classmates aren't also out there attempting, things that they all get celebrated for trying while female teens like Lily, Bex, Em and Sarah are labeled as sluts, bimbos and whores when they do the same. More importantly, Levinson does a fine job of showcasing just how strong the friendship amongst this quartet is, their bond authentically naturalistic. They're all there for one another, and as surrealistic and fantastically unhinged as things become that facet of the film emotionally grounds the story in a way that's continually surprising.

It should be noted that none of the points being made here are in anyway subtle. They're also blatantly obvious. But that doesn't make what Levinson is saying any less vital or important. His observations on what's happening in the United States culturally right now is fairly spot-on, and as extreme and as exploitive as things get all one has to do is watch a Presidential rally or turn on the nightly news and realize it wouldn't take all that many steps for civilization to dehumanize itself in a somewhat similar fashion. Levinson takes 'boys will be boys' and asserts that all of us, women in particular, should just shut up and be okay with that cliché to its logical conclusion, the fact these four women won't do just that the reason they end up being put right into the middle of the violently hypochondriacal crosshairs.

Not all of it works, and Levinson takes his sweet time letting things in Salem completely devolve into pandemonium. But I loved the performances he coaxes out of Nef, Abra, Waterhouse and especially Young, all four actresses traversing into unexpected emotive terrain that frequently caught me unprepared. There's a marvelous moment from Nef that had me choking back tears, Bex desperately trying to keep her composure after a classmate she's been crushing on makes his move and she willingly gives herself to him body and soul only to have the boy slink out of the room afterward terrified his friends will discover he's had sex with his school's lone transgender student. Later on, Young has a pair of stunning scenes where Lily witnesses unspeakable carnage coupled with a selfless sacrifice that allows her to flee to safety only to discover she's inadvertently found solace in the arms of the person who's been secretly leading the charge to string her and her friends up for crimes they did not commit.

Moments like these are what give the movie its punch. Levinson allows his heroines to be real people. They make mistakes. They don't always do the right thing. But they're honest with one another when it counts, ready to do whatever it takes to ensure they all have at least a fair shot at happiness. So even when things turn into a Russ Meyer Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! fantasyland where scantily clad women strike back at those who have wronged them with a lethal viciousness that seems more than a little fantastical, because Levinson has grounded Lily, Bex, Em and Sarah in an honestly emotional foundation I was much more willing to accept the implausible craziness of the situation far more readily than I otherwise would have been able to.

There's plenty I've managed to avoid talking about in regards to the film, stuff like a brief supporting turn from Bill Skarsgård that might be more terrifying than his work as Pennywise in last year's It or how editor Ron Patane (A Most Violent Year) dynamically cuts the picture with a stylistic precision that's invigorating. I also couldn't help but love the way the director stages a signature sequence straight out of the Sergio Leone playbook where all four women clad in stylish red trench coats take up arms and defiantly stand up against the two-faced lynch mob looking to murder them. But it's how all these various pieces fit together that makes Assassination Nation work as well as it does, and while Levinson doesn't hit every target he aims at, the ones that strike the target end up right at the very center of the sadistically satirical bulls-eye.


Imaginatively inventive Clock a magically good time
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE HOUSE WITH A
CLOCK IN ITS WALLS


The House with a Clock in Its Walls is very entertaining. Fast-paced and imaginative, this beguiling gem of a family-friendly horror yarn is an engaging bit of supernatural goofiness I enjoyed immensely. Based on the best-selling book by John Bellairs and featuring a solid script by 'Supernatural' mastermind Eric Kripke and surprisingly nimble direction from Cabin Fever and Hostel impresario Eli Roth, this movie is a blast, and I have a sneakily sinister suspicion audiences of all ages are undoubtedly going to feel the same.

At least that's my hope. Roth and Kripke remember that horror can be for kids and adults alike, neither of them skimping on the scares or the wonderment as far as this magical piece of pop entertainment is concerned. The pair strike a delicate balance, maintaining their PG rating and making things suitable for younger viewers while at the same time treating both them and their parents with a level of intelligent respect that's rare for live action horror-fantasies in this vein. It puts recent efforts like 2015's Goosebumps (which incidentally also starred Jack Black, the erstwhile headliner here) to shame while at the same time reminding me of past favorites like Gremlins, Adventures in Babysitting, The Witches and even that first adventure of everyone's favorite boy wizard, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.

Not that I'm proclaiming Roth and Kripke's adaptation an instant classic or anything. It's a little overly comical, and not all of the individual elements fueling the story come together as nicely as they maybe could have. While an energetically wicked Kyle MacLachlan is having an obvious ball portraying the film's primary villain, he's also not utilized particularly well and as such he's just not that threatening. Also problematic is Roth's staging of the climactic sequences, the director allowing the special effects to overwhelm the story in a way that lessens the emotional impact of the life or death decisions our heroes are forced to make.

As to that plot, the basic scenario revolves around the recently orphaned Lewis Barnavelt (Owen Vaccaro). It is 1955 and he finds himself relocated to the sleepy Midwest town of New Zebedee to live with his eccentric Uncle Jonathan (Black) in his creepy gated mansion which he's fairly certain has a mind of its own. Lewis is also introduced to his Uncle's best friend and neighbor Florence Zimmerman (Cate Blanchett), the larger-than-life woman showcasing a kooky affinity for the color purple and a delicious ability to make the best chocolate chip cookies the boy has ever tasted.

Turns out, both Jonathan and Florence have magical abilities. More, they're willing to teach Lewis the tricks of the trade and, if he shows enough interest and is willing to study hard, are going to help him become a full-fledged warlock if he so desires. But the pair is also hiding a terrifying secret, and it's lurking inside the very house in which the boy now lives. Years earlier powerful dark warlock Isaac Izard (MacLachlan) hid a devilish clock inside the walls, and Jonathan and Florence must find it before it strikes its final doomsday gong.

Lewis is naturally the key to solving this mystery, the kid both the reasons things begin to accelerate towards apocalypse as well as the one who is most likely to save the entire Earth from certain annihilation. In the end each hero learns important life lessons about family, love, friendship and responsibility that will affect them for the rest of their lives. Most notably, Florence is forced to face down her tragic past and rediscover powers she'd allowed to go dormant in the aftermath of WWII, Kripke's scripting of this and other moments never hesitating to go into some pretty complex territory. But he also assumes his audience, no matter their age, will be smart enough to put many of the pieces of Lewis, Arthur and Florence's respective stories together for themselves, never spoon-feeding what is going on which then allows the emotional components to become all the more powerful.

It's pretty terrific, and Roth handles the various facets of this tale with confident gusto. Even as cartoonish and silly as some of it can be, which honestly is a little par for the course for kid-centric thrillers such as this, the filmmaker continues to put his characters first, allowing them to craft full-bodied, three-dimensional portraits overflowing in honest human emotion. Also, as good as Black is (he's pretty wonderful) and as enchanting as newcomer Vaccaro might be (he's a spunky delight), Blanchett takes command of the movie and steals every single scene she's in. Her flamboyant exuberance is intoxicating, and I'd honestly love a spin-off tale following Florence in her day-to-day life picking just the right purple outfit and perfecting her chocolate cookie recipe while battling supernatural evil in her spare time.

Roth has made a few movies I've liked, most notably Cabin Fever and The Green Inferno, but none of his efforts have ever struck me as pieces of exploitive horror entertainment I'd ever watch more than once. The House with a Clock in Its Walls is the first feature of his I can't wait to return to, and the filmmaker being forced to deliver a PG rating seems to have focused him behind the camera like it never has before. As slight this movie might be, it's just so much gosh darn fun its various shortcomings thankfully don't add up to much, Roth finally making a motion picture I can heartily recommend with no reservations whatsoever.


Murderously facile Life Itself a torturous melodrama
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

LIFE ITSELF
Now playing


Life Itself isn't very good. Writer/director Dan Fogelman (Tangled, Crazy Stupid Love) has delivered a massive star-studded melodrama that's relentlessly cruel, unbelievably cloying, unabashedly sentimental and frustratingly facile. In an attempt to flesh out a sprawling, universal story of life's byzantine mysteries which includes healthy helpings of tragedy, regret, heartache and grief to go along with its depictions of family, romance, joy and selfless magnanimity, Fogelman forgets to ground his emotional smorgasbord into anything resembling reality. Instead, he's made a movie that's impossible to enjoy even during the portions of the story that do in fact work, the finished feature a disastrous misfire that easily ranks as one of 2018's most head-scratching disappointments.

The most unfortunate aspect to all of this is that there are sequences of the film that do work. Most notably, there is an entire subplot devoted to life on an olive farm in Andalusia lorded over by the mysterious Mr. Saccione (Antonio Banderas) who ends up taking a special interest in the life of his kind-hearted plantation manager Javier's (Sergio Peris- Mencheta) wife Isabelle (Laia Costa) and son Rodrigo (Adrian Marrero). It is the only section of the film that feels grounded in a recognizable environment, each character an intriguing conundrum of human frailty and dauntless courage that is extremely easy to relate to. Featuring a sensational performance from Banderas that's continually fascinating, I was drawn into this portion of the story in a way that honestly made me wish Fogelman had just made a film about these four and excised the rest of this disjointed mélange altogether.

But even this chapter of the tale ends up falling far short of its potential. Fogelman doesn't even attempt to conceal how these characters will end up becoming acquainted with the various New Yorkers we're introduced to during the first two-thirds of the movie. In fact, it's almost as if he is celebrating the gigantic coincidences required to bring them all into contact with one another. It's almost insulting how all of this fits together, the last scenes obnoxious in their mawkish self-indulgence. For all intents and purposes it is like the director is perfectly content to shoot himself in the foot over and over again for almost the entire 118 minute running time, and for the life of me I can't seem to figure out who he thought would find any of this intriguing let alone worth watching in the first place.

Split into a series of various chapters chronicling individual characters and/or couples at any one time, the movie attempts to cover roughly 21 years of life split between New York and that Spanish olive farm. One story focuses on married couple Will (Oscar Isaac) Abby (Olivia Wilde), while another concerns their daughter, Dylan (Olivia Cooke) and her relationship with her grandfather, Irwin (Mandy Patinkin). There's a piece that follows Will by himself as he chats about what's going on inside his head with his court-mandated psychiatrist Dr. Morris (Annette Bening), the two having an elongated session where comforting fiction gives way to tragic reality. The climactic section concerns itself with a new college-aged Rodrigo (Àlex Monner), the young man heading across the ocean to attend school at NYU only to end up encountering someone directly tied to a terrifying family vacation that irrevocably scarred him over a decade prior.

For a movie where 21 years splash by in the blink of an eye, it's impossible to know when exactly Fogelman is staging any of this nonsense. Considering Will and Abby's fondness for 1990s cinema (Pulp Fiction, Beautiful Girls and The Professional are all directly referenced), one can assume their romance and marriage takes place during that decade. But other than some Halloween costumes, the clothing, makeup styles and production design look decidedly modern. If that were the case, though, that would mean Dylan and Rodrigo's respective stories would be taking place sometime in the future. Yet things still look the same, almost as if everyone involved in this tale was frozen in some sort of time loop, making this just another element that shatters any chance the film might have had to be grounded in anything resembling a realistic milieu.

Yet that isn't the big problem. That is Fogelman's sprawling, disjointed script. While he's trying to show how life's myriad of possibilities, positive, negative and all areas in-between, help shape who we are as human beings in ways we barely comprehend, instead all the filmmaker does is craft a relentlessly cruel drama that seems more interested in showcasing heartlessly exploitive melodramatic coincidences than it is in doing anything remotely substantive. It maims, kills, bruises and batters its characters with the determination of a psychopathic serial killer, 'life' in Fogelman's world nothing more than an invisible Michael Myers callously slaughtering metaphorical babysitters.

I don't want to sound like the film is a total loss. The Andalusia section really is quite good at times, and both Banderas and Costa are exceptional. Wilde, too, gives a rather strong performance, and if her character wasn't so poorly treated by the material there's a good chance I'd have been willing to forgive Fogelman's opus for at least a few of its more egregious missteps. But I just can't do it. This movie slams the viewer against the pavement time and time again almost as if doing so were an Olympic sport. As I've already stated, Life Itself isn't very good, and unlike the longwinded Fogelman I've got nothing more to add.


Unfocused Night School flunks its entertainment exam
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

NIGHT SCHOOL
Now playing


After he loses his job as a salesman when his place of employment literally goes up in smoke, it quickly becomes apparent Teddy Walker (Kevin Hart) isn't going to find another well-paying job anytime soon without a high school diploma. As such, his best friend Marvin (Ben Schwartz) convinces him to head back to their old stomping grounds, Atlanta's Piedmont High School, and get his GED.

Unknown to both of them, Teddy's former nemesis Stewart (Taran Killam) is the current principal, and he's looking forward to seeing the guy who mocked him as a kid fall flat on his face when he fails to pass the test. But determined teacher Carrie (Tiffany Haddish) isn't interested in seeing any student, even her night school adults looking to get their GED, not live up to their potential, and she's determined to do whatever she can to see all of them, including Teddy, succeed.

Night School, not to be confused with the gender-flipped 1981 cult favorite slasher film of the same name, has a lot more on its mind than reveling in a bunch of adults making fools of themselves by engaging in a number of ribald juvenile high jinks. Director Malcolm D. Lee, the man behind Girls Trip, The Best Man Holiday, Roll Bounce and Undercover Brother, attempts to make a movie that celebrates the power of education while also generating a number of laughs that hopefully come from a place of character-driven authenticity. His goal is to balance drama, humor and a bit of social commentary in much the same manner as he has in his previous efforts, hopefully entertaining and enlightening the audience in equal measure as he does so.

Unfortunately, Lee can't pull it off. Working from a script credited to six different writers, a list that includes Hart (who also produces), Nicholas Stoller (Neighbors) and John Hamburg (Zoolander), this comedy is a hodgepodge of ideas, subplots, concepts, jokes and melodramatic contrivances that never coalesce into a coherent whole. It's a messy, unfocused comedy that feels continually out of balance with itself, almost as if Lee and his talented cast are desperately searching for a way to make all of this work in a way that doesn't feel forced or false. While there are some laughs, while a few solid dramatic moments are to be found, on the whole nothing ends up working, the final film a frustrating misfire that sadly proves to be a waste of time for almost everyone involved.

Which is a shame because there are a lot of nice things happening here, not the least of which is Haddish's committed and surprisingly fiery performance. Carrie has a lot to say about her job, what it means to her and why education matters. Additionally, the character also finds time to make more than a few salient points about the educational system as a whole, and while some of them might come off as overly glib or slightly flippant, these remarks still allow the actress to display an agreeably dynamic serious side she doesn't typically get to show.

I also like that a number of the supporting players are given room to shine, most notably Mary Lynn Rajskub as one of Teddy's fellow night school classmates, the '24' and 'The Girlfriend Experience' veteran making the delightful, energetic most out of every scene she's involved with. It's also nice to see a movie that attempts to showcase a platonic relationship between its two leads, allowing them to have separate lives out of the classroom that have nothing to do with one another.

But the rest of the night school class? It's as if all of them, Rob Riggle, Romany Malco, Al Madrigal, Joseph 'Fat Joe' Cartegna and Anne Winters, aren't working from the same page. There are long stretches where I felt like they were all in a different movie, as if each actor had been dropped into this story from a storytelling planet located at opposite ends of the universe. The melodramatic bits and the raunchy bits never gel together in satisfying fashion, while almost any moment that Killam is involved with (save a post-credits bit of silliness at his high school's prom) falls flatter than a pancake run over by an out of control steamroller.

Yet the biggest problem is Hart. As funny as he can be at times, he's just all wrong as Teddy. His performance is too broad, too cartoonish, too all over the map, his entire presence a cacophony of energetic tics and tricks that grow increasingly tiresome as the story moves forward. Hart's antics are more annoying than they are anything else, and as Teddy is supposed to be someone the audience is supposed to grow to love the fact I wanted to watch every other character in the movie make something out of themselves other than him is undeniably a giant problem. Hart overplays his hand to such an extent he ends up slaughtering any chance the dramatic moments ever had of proving to be effective, and all I could do as the story continued was wonder how much better all this might have been had Lee reined his star in even a little bit.

There are other issues, most of a relatively minor variety, that sadly begin to add up into being hugely problematic over the course of the film's 111-minute running time. The thing is, as hit-and-miss as I personally find Lee's filmography, the truth of the matter is that he's got a pretty solid track record of being able to balance comedy, drama and a social conscience rather nicely. The fact Night School is such an unacceptable catastrophe on that front is rather unbelievable, the whole project flunking its final exam so thoroughly I can only imagine it will be expelled from theatres relatively soon.


Letting Gilda tell Gilda's story
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ArtsWest's Skeleton Crew a deeply moving production
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Chills, thrills and more | On stage in October
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PNB's 'Jerome Robbins Festival' a delightful celebration of his genius
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IN MEMORIAM: Arthur Mitchell (1934-2018)
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Skylight misses clarity
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A Small History is sweet and unexpected
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Rainbow City Performing Arts presents the 2018 Rainbow Ball Gala & Fundraiser
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Seattle Humane - Pets of the Week
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BELLEVUE FASHION WEEK
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Pacific Northwest Ballet
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AN OPEN LETTER TO POPE FRANCIS
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Funny and cathartic, Gilda a spellbinding love letter to a comedy legend
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Sadistically satirical Nation violently assassinates the patriarchy
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Imaginatively inventive Clock a magically good time
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Murderously facile Life Itself a torturous melodrama
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