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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, September 21, 2018 - Volume 46 Issue 38
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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Compelling Lizzie an axe-wielding drama of romance and regret
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

LIZZIE
Now playing


It is 1892. Lizzie Borden (Chloë Sevigny) lives with her sister Emma (Kim Dickens) and stepmother Abby (Fiona Shaw) in her wealthy Massachusetts father Andrew's (Jamey Sheridan) pristine home. Outspoken and opinionated, she is a societal outcast with very few friends. Yet things brighten up a little with the arrival of the new maid, Bridget Sullivan (Kristen Stewart), the two of them developing a deep, almost primal connection that goes far beyond friendship.

So begins Lizzie, director Craig William Macneill (Boy) and screenwriter Bryce Kass' intriguing, thought-provoking historical drama that attempts to get into the mind of Lizzie Borden, the notorious young woman who was acquitted of murdering her father and stepmother with an axe. In exploring one of the most famous, and undeniably grizzly, unsolved murders in U.S. history, the filmmakers craft a human story of resilience, romance, heartbreak, and dehumanization that just so happens to culminate with an act of violence so abhorrent it's no wonder people continue to be fascinated with the crime more than a century after the fact.

This isn't a sensationalistic film. It doesn't play up the lurid details of the murder or get all prepubescently infantile concerning Lizzie's relationship with Bridget. Instead, Macneill and Kass focus on the family dynamics, especially those between the authoritative Andrew and his psychologically damaged youngest daughter. She is a woman of a new age, a new century, while he is a man who believes gender roles are inviolate - that men will always know what is best and women should be content with their lot in life and not allow themselves to want more. This battle of wills is what slowly but surely tears Lizzie to pieces, and while she finds solace in Bridget's loving arms, as their romance is a forbidden one it will cause much in the way of heartache and consternation as things progress to their bloody denouement.

For Sevigny, who also has a producer credit, this is an obvious labor of love. She plays Lizzie with a crafty, unsettled determination that grows in frazzled intensity as the character's battles with her father become increasingly rancorous. Her scenes with Sheridan vibrate with an unhinged magnetism that allows for almost any conceivable possibility whenever the two face one another down. These scenes are juxtaposed nicely with Lizzie's growing infatuation with Bridget, Sevigny switching gears in such a manner that her emotional center is stripped right down to the marrow, the former Boys Don't Cry Oscar nominee crafting a performance of such exquisite psychological nuance it becomes a question what exactly is more horrifying: the butchering of Andrew and Abby or how their murder, via fifty whacks of a freshly sharpened axe, ends up devastating what up until that moment had been a selfless love free of imperfection and constant in its purity.

Stewart is equally up to the challenge. While noticeably playing second fiddle to her costar, the Twilight megastar dazzles as she continues to expand her horizons these past few years, her work here nearly as magnificent as it was in her films for Olivier Assayas (Personal Shopper, Clouds of Sils Maria), Kelly Reichardt (Certain Women), or Peter Sattler (Camp X-Ray). There is a purity to the actress's work as Bridget, a quiet melancholic resolve that becomes more poignant and gut-wrenching as events spiral out of control. The last scene between the two main characters shattered me to pieces, Stewart saying more with a rumpled look of despairing paranoiac disbelief than most other actors could manage with two full pages of explanative dialogue.

There's plenty more to get excited about, including a bravura supporting turn from veteran character actor Denis O'Hare that's wickedly Machiavellian in its self-possessed enthusiasm. But what's best about his performance is the way Macneill craftily spins things on their head as it pertains to his character, the reasons for his being a part of this story better left discovered by the viewer without any explanation from me. Safe to say O'Hare and Sevigny share a few scenes together, but it is two signature moments between the two that caused me to inch closer to the screen in captivated glee. These sequences are like little bookends that help put everything in a subtle, forcefully pointed perspective, allowing the themes concerning the patriarchal oppression of women to shimmer with a pronounced aggressiveness that's complicatedly disconcerting.

There is blood, the movie refusing to sugarcoat the gruesome violence that has made Lizzie Borden's story stand the test of time. Macneill's staging of this moment isn't for the faint of heart. At the same time, it's also strangely aloof, and if not for Sevigny's and Stewart's dual refusal to play things safe I'm not sure the murder would have resonated with me in any noticeable way. But both actresses nakedly revel in the moment, each finding a unique way to show how their respective character is responding to what is happening that goes against genre convention and reveals fresh facets of Lizzie's and Bridget's psyches that I found fascinating. While the line between fact and fiction remains hazy, Lizzie is a compelling drama of human desire, oppression, romance, and regret I'll not soon forget.


21st Annual Local Sightings Film Festival Sept. 21-29
Ten questions with Festival Director Sophie Donlon

by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

LOCAL SIGHTINGS
FILM FESTIVAL
NORTHWEST FILM FORUM
September 21-29


Beginning this evening with the Opening Night Gala 'Party On Set,' the Northwest Film Forum (1515 12th Ave.) kicks off the 21st annual Local Sightings Film Festival with a proverbial bang. Running through Saturday, Sept. 29, the festival features a collection of features, shorts, events, workshops and archival presentations focusing on the various communities living here in the Pacific Northwest. It's an ambitious lineup, and viewers of all ages should be able to find more than a few screenings that pique their interest.

I was able to ask Festival Director Sophie Donlon ten questions about this year's festival. Here are her responses:

Sara Michelle Fetters: This is the 21st year for the Local Sightings Film Festival and your second year as director. Why has this festival endured? What makes it so special?

Sophie Donlon: I believe Local Sightings has endured for 21 years because of the filmmakers. They're the heart and soul of the festival and that's why we really work to make the focus of the festival the people involved in the film community. Over the years, Local Sightings has become a place where filmmakers can connect with their peers, develop collaborations and find resources, and that's something we actively cultivate through industry events and workshops.

This year, to further those goals, we've expanded the awards structure to better recognize the many different facets of the filmmaking process and to offer prizes that will provide resources for filmmakers to aid their artistic pursuits, including cash prizes, gear rentals, a SIFF Industry Pass, gift certificates to Glazers and more. So, in addition to our traditional prizes of Best Feature and Short, Best Original Composition for a Feature and Short, and Audience Award for Feature and Short, we're also awarding Best Cinematography, Best Sound Design and Emerging Filmmaker for first time feature or short director, and an Impact Award in recognition of a film that motivates taking action for social change and movement building.

Another reason the festival has endured is because of everyone at Northwest Film Forum. Their passion and commitment to supporting film and filmmakers in our community and region is endlessly admirable. What makes Local Sightings special is that it is different from many other traditional film festivals. It mixes and melds screenings, panels and events and brings together diverse facets of the community. It's not uncommon at Local Sightings for an established filmmaker whose film premiered at Sundance having their Seattle premiere next to a young director presenting their first feature. Local Sightings is a place where these bridges can be built and that's something worth cultivating and protecting. I'm so excited to see what the next 21 years of Local Sightings will bring!

Sara Michelle Fetters: What are the challenges of programming a festival like this?

Sophie Donlon: One of the challenges of programming is finding ways to pursue all of the incredible ideas and opportunities that are brought to us and to fit it into a weeklong festival! One thing I love about Local Sightings is the way it engages with different parts of the arts community in Seattle, from music to dance to visual arts, and one of my goals moving forward is to expand on those relationships even more.

Another challenge is also what makes it so rewarding. We're a very small team, so everyone has a part in everything. At certain points, it's felt like I'm living and breathing Local Sightings, but that's really not something to complain about at all!

Sara Michelle Fetters: What surprised you the most about this year's submissions?

Sophie Donlon: It wasn't exactly a surprise, but I'm always awed by the vibrance of the experimental scene in the Pacific Northwest. Features like the experimental animation North of Blue and the experimental documentary Essays of a City, are simultaneously profound visual and intellectual experiences and are really like nothing else I've seen.

Something that struck me in this year's submissions overall was a sense of rumination and gravity in the stories filmmakers are choosing to tell. Whether the films are personal narratives, like Kadazia Allen-Perry's deeply intimate account of living with cystic fibrosis, Chronic Means Forever, or documentaries with a global lens, like Vancouver: No Fixed Address, about the Vancouver, BC housing crisis, or a romance in the tradition of classic Hollywood cinema, like Forgotten Man, the films in the festival approach their topics with a real sense of reflection. I believe this speaks to our current moment, which often feels tumultuous, and filmmakers in our region are responding to that by focusing intently on examining with care and poignancy what it means to live and make art in this world.

Sara Michelle Fetters: Talk to me about this year's workshops. Why are these important? How do you hope audiences/attendees get involved?

Sophie Donlon: The workshops this year showcase stunning emerging projects, including Shontina Vernon's workshop and discussion around her juvenile incarceration project Grrrl Justice, and the screening and panel around the new short film speaking to the forgotten histories of people of color, The New Frontier, with director Kanani Koster and the team of writers.

With the festival workshops, we strive to provide filmmakers with both education and resources, and further to prompt discussions about the impact of film in communities. Matt Longmire's workshop 'The Indie Filmmaker's Guide to Captions & Subtitles' is part education and part advocacy for the importance of adding captions and subtitles to indie film projects in order to make independent films more accessible to deaf and hard-of-hearing communities, as well as to the rest of the world with subtitles.

A workshop that is not to be missed is 'Shaping Stories, Building Power,' taught by one of our jurors, Paige Watkins. Paige is the associate director of Detroit Narrative Agency (DNA), which works to incubate quality and compelling stories that will shift the dominant narratives about Detroit towards liberation and justice. In this workshop, participants will be able to gain a deeper understanding of the Detroit Narrative Agency's model and values, view the recent short films supported by DNA and discuss how to build systems for accountable, community-based filmmaking in a local context.

Workshops are so important because they are a crucial way for festival filmmakers and attendees to share knowledge and perspective. They're a crucial tool and a great way for filmmakers and audiences alike to learn more about media and communities!

Sara Michelle Fetters: And then you have quite the eclectic lineup of special presentations. What is the process for programming these?

Sophie Donlon: The special presentations came together very organically. A few of the programs are a part of ongoing relationships with partner organizations, such as our Indigenous Showcase series co-presented with Longhouse Media, which this year features the documentary Mele Murals, and our co-presentation with Moving Image Preservation of Puget Sound (MIPoPS) of Vi Hilbert's informational films that promote the preservation of the Lushootseed language. In our other special presentations we're always looking to highlight the emerging work of creators in the region. That's really what sparked events like the screening of It Happened at the World's Fair at SIFF Cinema Egyptian with live commentary by Charles Mudede, Ahamefule Oluo and Lindy West, who are all collaborators on the upcoming film Thin Skin. Another example of this is the 'GIFgantic Comic Event: Kelton Sears presents Trash Mountain.' I was so excited when I first saw Kelton's work because it's so sharp and funny, and because it's exactly the kind of alternative multimedia storytelling that I want to highlight. In that sense, I look at the special presentations both as a way to honor the history of the Pacific Northwest and celebrate new works.

Sara Michelle Fetters: The level of inclusion and diversity in this year's full lineup is remarkable. Is it difficult to program such a richly inclusive festival? How do you make sure to showcase features and shorts that represent the entire Pacific Northwest as a whole?

Sophie Donlon: It is definitely something I feel very strongly about and so was very intentional with when I was programming the films. It wasn't difficult, per se, because the stories are out there and are being made all over the Pacific Northwest. A large part of what me and the programming team did was research the films that are being made and reach out to groups that have worked with the Northwest Film Forum in the past to solicit the submissions. I feel that my role as the director is to provide a platform to filmmakers to present their work, especially those who haven't been traditionally recognized by established structures. In addition to considering the filmmaker and the subjects of the film when programming a diverse and inclusive festival, we took care to include films from all over the region that told a wide range of stories and perspectives.

Sara Michelle Fetters: As mentioned before, this is your second year as director of the festival. How much fun are you having? What's it mean to you personally to be bringing a festival like this one to the people of Seattle?

Sophie Donlon: Local Sightings means so much to me. It was the first film festival I ever attended and to be the festival director for the second year in a row is such a surreal beautiful honor. Through my work, I've learned so much about the Pacific Northwest film community and about the region itself. It continually inspires me to expand my own perspectives on film and pushes me to bring our audiences screenings and events that inspire them.

Watching a movie is a very personal experience, but for me movies come the most alive when you talk about them with friends and peers. One of the things I love most about Local Sightings is that it creates opportunities to connect filmmakers and audiences in a shared space that cultivates discussion. These discussions about form, subject matter, artistry and impact begin in Q&As and panels with filmmakers, and I see them extend to the lobby after a screening and even to festival parties.

Everyone at Northwest Film Forum and I have worked so hard to put this festival together, and it's been so fulfilling and fun! We're all very serious about what we do, but we're also very serious about play. For the opening night 'Party on Set,' we're transforming the Forum into a filmmakers' playground where attendees can make and star in their own mini-films! One of the stations is a green-screen open script reading set, and as part of this I made all these hand puppets; it really gave me a chance to develop my Nicolas Cage impression. So yeah, I'm having a lot of fun!

Sara Michelle Fetters: What part does the Local Sightings festival play in the overall mission of the NW Film Forum?

Sophie Donlon: Northwest Film Forum was founded as a collective with the goals of providing support and resources to Seattle filmmakers. Local Sightings embodies those community-based values. The core values of both Northwest Film Forum and Local Sightings are to get people talking about film and creative action, and to get them creating and collaborating together. I see Local Sightings as a microcosm of the work we do all year long to celebrate and uplift the local film community.

Sara Michelle Fetters: When you think about this year's festival, what brings the biggest smile to your face? What gets you the most excited?

Sophie Donlon: It's really hard to choose! I mentioned many amazing screenings and events previously which are must-sees. I think the entire program is incredibly strong this year, and there's so many I can't wait to watch again myself on the big screen! I'm also so excited to meet and spend time with all of the filmmakers and hear more about their work in their own words.

Sara Michelle Fetters: What do you hope attendees take away from this year's festival? What do you hope they're talking about?

Sophie Donlon: I hope that audiences come away enlivened by the remarkable and important work being made in the Pacific Northwest. We want to share stories that inspire action and collaboration, and moreover, leaving audiences with a sense of the impact that movies can have on the world starting in our own communities.


Legal melodrama The Children Act showcases a stellar Thompson
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE CHILDREN ACT
Now playing


High Court Judge Fiona Maye (Emma Thompson) specializes in juvenile cases, especially as they pertain to the medical profession. The latest case she is presiding over is one of her most challenging: Seventeen-year-old Adam Henry (Fionn Whitehead) is in dire need of a blood transfusion so he can continue cancer treatment, doctors and nurses working overtime to persuade him and his parents, Kevin (Ben Chaplin) and Naomi (Eileen Walsh), to allow the procedure before it is too late. But they are all refusing for religious reasons, and in the process putting the boy's life in immediate jeopardy. As the age of individual consent in Britain is 18, the question before Judge Maye is whether or not the hospital can forcibly execute the blood transfusion over the objections of the patient and his parents, the law not nearly as straightforward on the matter as the lawyers on both sides of the case are attempting to argue.

Back at home things aren't any more relaxed. Judge Maye's academic husband Jack (Stanley Tucci) wants her permission to have an affair, the casual way he asks the question instantaneously transforming his usually poised and polished wife into an emotional wreck. Beside herself as to what to do regarding both the case and her marriage, Judge Maye is trying to keep her composure and not let anyone notice just how shaky the psychological ground she's presiding over now is. All of which makes her budding friendship with Henry all the more unusual, their conversations forcing her to look at her life with Jack in ways she's never considered up until now.

If one is a fan of Emma Thompson, then director Richard Eyre's (Notes on a Scandal, Iris) adaptation of author Ian McEwan's The Children Act is an essential piece of cinematic melodrama that should be seen at the earliest possible convenience. The two-time Academy Award winner (as both an actress and as a screenwriter for 1995's Sense and Sensibility) is superb as Judge Maye, delivering a performance of staggering emotional nuance that grows in resonance and power as events progress. Thompson has incredible chemistry with Tucci and also shares a couple of staggeringly intimate moments with young Whitehead that brought tears to my eyes. She is the reason to watch this movie, that's all there is to say, and as such the actress is the sole reason Eyre's latest ends up working as well as it ultimately does.

Which, sadly, isn't all that well. Even with Thompson, McEwan's reworking of his novel for the screen feels more like a rather forgettable British-themed episode of 'Law & Order' than it does anything else, Eyre's staid and inflexibly solemn direction not helping matters. The dramatic contrivances sitting at the heart of the story are more akin to Peyton Place than to Inherit the Wind or To Kill a Mockingbird, the ponderous emotional machinations the filmmakers continually utilize to move the plot forward tiresome. I just found it difficult to maintain interest in what was going on, and although I was unfamiliar with McEwan's book there wasn't a single thing that caught me by surprise.

Not that I found The Children Act to be a total waste of time. Tucci's role may be underdeveloped but he still manages to make the most of it. His scenes with Thompson crackle and sing, each actor showcasing a passionate urgency that hints at the deeper, more complicated themes I'm sure were explored far more successfully in McEwan's novel than they sadly are here. But I still loved watching them whenever they were together, the two actors able to convey so much with such effortless grace, oftentimes without much in the way of dialogue, that I don't believe I could have taken my eyes off either actor even had I wanted to try.

Then there is an initial scene between Judge Maye and young Henry inside the latter's hospital room. The scene is a brittle, potent reminder of just how great a director Eyre can be when he sets his mind to it, the filmmaker staging an elongated moment of character exploration that's marvelous. Thompson and Whitehead manage an instant connection, the two actors engaging in an intellectual dance that casually box-steps its way into quiet magnificence with eloquent precision. There is a level of humane intimacy that blew me away, and it's an absolute shame the film never again rises to that level throughout its 105-minute running time.

Other elements I responded favorably to included Stephen Warbeck's (Shakespeare in Love) subtle score and Andrew Dunn's (Book Club) comfortably commanding cinematography. I also felt the final scene ends things on just the right note, and any film that can stick the landing as well as this one does deserves at the very least a modicum of my respect. All the same, if not for Thompson's bravura performance I doubt there'd be a heck of a lot going on here I'd want to spend my time talking about. The Children Act is a well-intentioned melodrama whose various bits and pieces are interesting, and far more memorable, than the finished product frustratingly proves to be.


Cosmatos' Mandy overflowing in expressionistically bonkers bravado
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

MANDY
Now playing


The glorious, phantasmagoric insanity of writer/director Panos Cosmatos' and co-writer Aaron Stewart-Ahn's Mandy cannot be over-appreciated. This is controlled schizoid cinematic mania on a grand scale, all of it living inside a junky, suitably sparse 1980s-style low-budget exploitation thriller where shock and awe coexist with moody three-dimensional character development in something close to Heavy Metal harmony. This is an aggressive and violent movie, yet it is also one that unabashedly wears its heart on its Black Sabbath t-shirt sleeve, all of it propelled forward by an unhinged, brazenly uninhibited performance from star Nicolas Cage that's every bit as goofily manic as longtime fans of the actor ever could have hoped for.

As indescribable as much of it proves to be, the film is still an almost perfect follow-up to Cosmatos' equally mind-bending debut, the surrealistic 2010 science fiction conundrum Beyond the Black Rainbow. While more straightforward and plot-driven (to a certain degree) than that one was, Mandy still shares many DNA similarities with the director's psychologically unbalancing debut. The neon color schemes, the almost Salvador Dali-esque imagery, the way one scene can slam into another creating messy, visually resplendent panoramas of beauty and debauchery, often both at the exact same time - it's all part of what makes this thriller click as well as it does.

But where Beyond the Black Rainbow was a dreamscape of uncertain mystery that seemed born entirely out of the ether with few human elements grounding it in tactile reality, this story is fueled by white-hot character interactions overflowing in emotional complexities that are distinctly relatable. It's an intriguing evolution for Cosmatos, the director sticking with what can be construed as a signature filmmaking style yet now determined to ground it in an ethereal, metaphorically psychosomatic atmosphere reminiscent of the recent, even more esoteric offerings of vaunted director Terrence Malick (Song to Song, Knight of Cups, To the Wonder).

As mixtures go this is a daring one, and I can't say Mandy continually strikes a consistent balance among its varying elements. The first third is purposefully measured, Cosmatos taking his time building up these characters and documenting this grizzled, terrifically sparse 1983 world in which they reside. Some of this stuff can be purposefully trying, almost as if the film is daring the viewer to stick with it no matter what is currently happening. Then, as if he knows spectators are perched precariously upon their last viable nerve ending, Cosmatos allows things to explode in a multitude of mind-blowing, sometimes repugnant, continually spellbinding ways, light and dark battling for bloody supremacy in a no-holds-barred bout where the eventual victors are the members of the audience who watch this story play itself out to conclusion.

Then there is Cage. This is a next-level work by the veteran actor that recalls his epically hyperbolic performances in classics like Vampire's Kiss, Wild at Heart, Face/Off, and Adaptation. But he also mines similar emotional depths reminiscent of his Oscar-winning turn in Leaving Las Vegas, grounding all the gruesome balletic mayhem in a believably empathetic milieu that's heartbreaking in its tragic melodramatic excess. While Cage's work this past decade or so has noticeably left a lot to be desired, Cosmatos (much like Werner Herzog did with Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans and Brian Taylor did with Mom and Dad) challenges the actor to let himself go wild like he did in the '80s and '90s, and as such he delivers a performance that's an undeniable triumph.

The plot is a relatively simplistic throwback to the likes of Straw Dogs or The Last House on the Left, only with a backwoods attitude oozing in Iron Maiden-meets-Metallica aggression. Logger Red Miller (Cage) lives a happy life with his artist wife Mandy (Andrea Riseborough), the pair's seemingly idyllic existence shattered with the arrival of a demonic cult calling themselves the Black Skulls who are led by the telekinetic Jeremiah Sand (Linus Roache). After an evening of supernaturally devilish violence, Miller refashions himself into a revenge-seeking road warrior, going after Sand and his followers with an unbalanced ferociousness that's inhuman. Chainsaw fights and other various forms of homicidal psychosis ensue.

Magnificently and expressionistically shot by Benjamin Loeb (King Cobra) and memorably scored within an inch of its harebrained life by the late, great Jóhann Jóhannsson (Arrival), much like his main character Cosmatos appears to be going for broke behind the camera every step of the way. He directs with a lunatic gusto that suits the material, and while not every second of the film works it's still impossible to imagine any single scene or sequence being cut out and the finished product working nearly as well as it ultimately does. Throw in Cage's borderline brilliance, and Mandy is a bonkers piece of sensationalistic bravado I couldn't help but adore, and here's my hope viewers lucky and daring enough to give it a look end up feeling the same.




New Zealand-based former Seattleite and Trans non-binary performer brings two award-winning rare stories about diversity, belonging, and resilience to Seattle
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An interview with Cirque du Soleil's Darius Harper and Joey Arrigo
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Richard III - Fascistic (and oddly funny)
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Take note and see The Noteworthy Life of Howard Barnes
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2018 Men in Dance Festival presented Sept. 28-30 & Oct. 5-7
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Century Ballroom and The Tin Table bring you the Bubble Ball
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Being an outlaw - Actress Chloë Sevigny brings an axe-wielding Lizzie Borden to life in Lizzie
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Seattle Humane - Pets of the Week
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AN OPEN LETTER TO POPE FRANCIS
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Compelling Lizzie an axe-wielding drama of romance and regret
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21st Annual Local Sightings Film Festival Sept. 21-29
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Legal melodrama The Children Act showcases a stellar Thompson
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Cosmatos' Mandy overflowing in expressionistically bonkers bravado
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