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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, July 27, 2018 - Volume 46 Issue 30
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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Introspectively incisive Eighth Grade an A-plus stunner
3 Elsie Fisher in Eighth Grade _ Photo courtesy of A24 by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

EIGHTH GRADE - Now playing

Standup comedian and actor Bo Burnham makes his directorial debut with the shockingly astute, movingly introspective coming-of-age drama Eighth Grade. A look into the life of middle school student Kayla (Elsie Fisher) just days before she graduates and can look forward to high school next fall, the film is a spellbinding high-wire act of insight and empathy, the final minutes achieving a form of kindhearted grace that left me breathless. This is a movie that refuses to shy away from some fairly dark realities yet at the same time doesn't dwell on them in ways that feel exploitive or supercilious. Instead, it's the bigger picture that matters, Kayla's journey so acutely haunting it's likely I'll be thinking about it in intense, fascinating detail for some time to come.

There are so many easy melodramatic outs to a story like this one, yet Burnham somehow finds a way to avoid almost all of them. Kayla isn't so much bullied as she is invisible. She's smart. She's intuitive. But she's also shy, pensive, and seemingly loath to stand out in ways that might get her recognized. Yet, just as clearly, Kayla does yearn to be noticed. She makes videos for her YouTube channel about the power of positivity and self-belief, urging her viewers to cherish their power and not be afraid of showing their true selves to the world. Yet she ends each one practically begging for likes and for viewers to share her videos before signing off with her catchphrase of 'Gucci!' - a clear cry for acknowledgment if there ever was one.

It's likely Fisher is best known for voicing unicorn-loving Agnes ('It's so fluffy!!!') in both of the first two Despicable Me hits. That's about to change. Her Kayla is a benevolent, knowingly brittle firebrand of untapped resilience and strength, Fisher finding her way with such a delicately self-assured grace she held me spellbound for every second of the film's briskly paced 93 minutes. This is as fearless a portrait of early teenage angst and uncertainty as any I can immediately recollect, the talented actress utilizing her purposefully awkward physicality to give things an extra layer of pensive validity that's striking.

But at least one-third of the film's humane, if still brusquely honest, effectiveness is directly due to the father-daughter story that plays out right alongside Kayla's attempts to finish her final days of middle school. Mark (a sublime, understated Josh Hamilton) can tell there's something going on with his child and knows she's feeling a type of pain that he hasn't the first clue how to help her ease. But just by being there, just by letting her know he'll listen if she wants to talk, just by saying nothing he adds a hope chest of sensitivity that's there whether his daughter realizes it or not, all of which helps give this story an extra layer of poignant wisdom that's wondrous.

There's honestly not a ton of plot. Kayla goes through her days at school, utilizes social media, and yearns to be seen. She makes unexpected friends with one of her school's popular kids, Olivia (Emily Robinson), and ends up going to a pool party where she proceeds to do the type of embarrassing things kids often do when they're trying to make an impression on those they long to impress. It's awkward and weird but also endearing and adorable, all of which makes this youngster's day-to-day journey uncomfortably prescient and lovably unctuous.

I can't say I've seen a lot of Burnham's standup comedy. I'm not familiar with him or his work. But this movie is such a startling, intelligently nuanced debut overflowing in observational expressiveness I'm all but ready to go opening night to whatever it is the filmmaker decides to bring our way next. Shot with documentary-like exactitude by Andrew Wehde and edited to within an inch of its shrewdly eloquent life by Jennifer Lilly (The One I Love), Burnham's film is marvelous. While my own middle school experiences aren't ones I'd want to relive, watching Eighth Grade is a trip back to school I'd be happy to take whenever the opportunity to do so might arise.


Minimalist historical thriller Lighthouse a beacon of low-budget ingenuity
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE LIGHTHOUSE - Now streaming on-demand

Just 25 miles off the coast in the deadly Irish Sea sits Smalls Island. It is 1801 and Thomas Howell (Michael Jibson) and Thomas Griffith (Mark Lewis Jones) have been tasked with keeping the all-important lighthouse located there lit for the next 30 days. Isolated and alone, the pair is none too happy about being stationed together at this assignment. Griffith knows of Howell's history, knows what happened the last time he had this sort of duty at a different lighthouse, and as such he believes having him here, on Smalls Island, is a giant mistake.

He's right, but not for the reasons the seasoned sailor and veteran lighthouse keeper thinks. When a freak storm hits the island, Howell and Griffith find themselves stranded in complete and total isolation with their food and water supply slowly dwindling down to nothing. They have zero chance of being rescued until the squall subsides, and as the days and nights drag on it becomes apparent this isn't going to happen anytime soon. Through it all they attempt to put aside their differences and keep the lighthouse running so as to protect the waterway for passing ships trying to navigate these dangerous waters. But as things progress Howell and Griffith are quickly reaching the end of their combined psychological rope, and if by some miracle they do survive, they'll likely do so at the cost of their sanity.

Based on a real tragedy, director and co-writer Chris Crow's award-winning 2016 drama finally makes its domestic theatrical and VOD debut, and for the most part it's been worth the wait. Methodically paced, the film does admittedly play more like a two character, dialogue-driven theater piece than it does a feature-length motion picture, and even at only 102 minutes things can noticeably drag. Yet Crow and fellow screenwriters Paul Bryant and Michael Jibson still do a nice job of keeping the focus on Howell and Griffith, all of which makes the horrors the pair end up facing far more emotionally affecting than they otherwise would have been.

Both Jones and Jibson are excellent, the latter especially so. Howell is determined to put what happened in the past behind him even if the weight of his previous failure still keeps him up at night battling terrifying visions and debilitating nightmares, the actor's exploration of these complicated emotional states, especially as things near their haunting climax, superb. Jibson's conversations with Jones feel urgent and vital, the two exploring different variations on concepts of personal responsibility, selfless heroism, and 19th-century masculinity (which sadly isn't that far removed from its 21st-century descendant) with a ruggedly withered intensity that's fascinating.

But all of this can be pretty slow going, and even if one knows nothing about the historical facts surrounding the Smalls Island Incident, it's still hardly going to come as a surprise to anyone watching the film where things end up. Crow's opus can feel more like a housebound (in this case lighthouse-bound) My Dinner with Andre than it does a psychological thriller analyzing isolated men under extreme duress. As such there are points where the tension inexplicably vanishes, my attention waning and my interest in whether or not Howell and Griffith would survive noticeably diminishing because of this.

Thankfully Crow shows an ability to quickly right his ship anytime it starts to take on too much water. The last third is especially captivating, and once things start to center more on Howell and how he is battling his remaining demons from his last lighthouse assignment, while also doing all he can to ensure the light stays lit at this one, the film really hits its suspenseful groove and doesn't let up until the end credits. I was especially taken with Alex Metcalfe's exquisite cinematography, his use of shadows, fog, and rain effects coupled with how all of them respond to varying forms of light gorgeously unsettling. As a minimalist survival thriller showcasing humanity's continual battle against the forces of nature, The Lighthouse is a beacon of low-budget indie ingenuity worth shining a positive spotlight upon.


John Callahan bio Don't Worry an emotionally bawdy celebration
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

DON'T WORRY, HE WON'T GET FAR ON FOOT
Now playing


Gus Van Sant's latest frenzied human drama Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far On Foot is perfectly imperfect. Based on portions of the memoir by Portland-based quadriplegic cartoonist John Callahan, the movie is an often anarchic, ribald descent down the addiction and recovery rabbit hole. As melodramatic as that might sound, Van Sant paints with such a sardonically lacerating brush there's little that ends up coming across as cloying, sophomoric, or slight, and even the preachy bits extolling the virtues of following all of Alcoholics Anonymous' 12 Steps don't feel anywhere near as didactic or pedantic as they easily could have in a lesser filmmaker's hands.

But the ace in the hole that the director unleashes with reflectively mischievous brio is star Joaquin Phoenix. Already having a 2018 to remember thanks to his justifiably lauded performance in Lynne Ramsay's revenge drama You Were Never Really Here, the celebrated actor once again transforms himself in ways that are as brazenly fearless as they are emotionally naked. His turn as Callahan is a maniacal balancing act that runs the gamut from obscene egotistical self-destruction to graceful selfless forgiveness to craven comedic politically incorrect mayhem, never hitting a false note. He drops himself inside the controversial cartoonist's skin with unsettling ease, the ways in which he gave himself over so completely to the character so introspectively massive it's easy to wonder if he came out of filming without more than a few psychological scars thanks to the experience.

It's weird, because even though all of this is derived from Callahan's best-selling memoir, so much of this story does feel a little like 'Cinematic Addiction Melodrama 101.' And yet, if Van Sant isn't hitting on all cylinders (this is no Drugstore Cowboy or My Own Private Idaho), he's just close enough to doing so as to give this motion picture a freewheeling devil-may-care meditative ferocity that's mesmerizing. The majority of the scenes dealing with Callahan's A.A. experiences happen in a small group setting inside the home of a wealthy Portland recovering alcoholic named Donnie (Jonah Hill), and these are anything but typical. Van Sant allows them to be a rambunctious celebration of truth, each participant telling their various stories with a vicious candor that's striking.

These conversations feature constant interruptions, overlapping bits of dialogue, and sudden outbursts whenever anyone attempts to stray from the truth that helped fuel their addiction to their particular vice of choice. The actors, which include the likes of a playfully anachronistic Udo Kier, a petulantly forceful Kim Gordon, and a gregariously honest Beth Ditto (a celebrated Portland singer and comedian making her movie debut), all command the screen in various ways, Hill lording over them all with a purposefully effete majesty that isn't nearly as stereotypical or offensive as a viewer's first impressions of Donnie might initially lead them to surmise. Van Sant digs deep during these conversations, allowing them to slowly break down Callahan's preconceived walls in a way that makes his eventual breakthroughs far more wrenchingly natural than I expected them to be.

The plot? As nonlinear and repetitive as it undeniably is, the actual story, even being true, isn't exactly anything new. The film shows how Callahan went from being a drunken California deadbeat wasting away his life, to a person suddenly finding himself battling for survival in a wheelchair, to an admitted addict aching for recovery, to an unapologetic rabble-rouser who uses his cartoons to provoke newspaper readers into seeing the world through a different, oftentimes objectionable lens. Van Sant captures as much about this portion of this artist's life as he can, doing so in ways that are as unbridled and as unhinged as the man himself so often proved to be.

It's explosively emotional, but not all of it works nearly as well as I kept hoping it was going to. Rooney Mara shows up as a Swedish physical therapist who inexplicably makes a career change to become a flight attendant, and this character felt more like a figment of either the director's or Callahan's imagination than it did a living, breathing human being. The early stuff with Jack Black, portraying a Hollywood wannabe playboy whose drunken night of debauchery with Callahan leads directly to Callahan's becoming a quadriplegic, is obnoxious in ways that drove me batty (and that's not a compliment) while the device of having the artist tell the story of his accident to a menagerie of different audiences doesn't work nearly as well as I'm certain Van Sant intended it to.

But Hill is excellent, delivering one of the best performances of his career. There are also some terrific bits between Phoenix and Sleater-Kinney founding member Carrie Brownstein, portraying Callahan's beleaguered Portland social worker, that held me spellbound, each moment the two are together building eloquently upon the one before it in ways that were consistently surprising. As for Black, I cannot discount his performance entirely because there's a third-act reappearance that forced me to look at both him and his character in a whole new light, the actor descending to a level of starkly repentant sincerity that brought tears to my eyes. There's also some superb camerawork from cinematographer Christopher Blauvelt (Indignation) and a marvelous score courtesy of veteran composer Danny Elfman (Good Will Hunting; Milk), Van Sant allowing both the freedom to put their own idiosyncratic stamp upon the film giving it an extra bit of spontaneity it otherwise would not have had.

Yet it is Phoenix, almost all on his own, who makes Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far On Foot something that borders on essential. Working together for the first time since 1995's To Die For, director and star are in such mutual synchronicity watching them do their thing with such invigorating dynamism is a gripping treat that must be seen to be believed. While not the artist's whole story from beginning to end, the pair still give this portion of Callahan's life the agitated bawdy attentiveness it so richly deserves, and in doing so illustrate a freewheeling celebration of recovery, artistic integrity, and selfless friendship worthy of applause.


Fallout lights the fuse on Cruise's best Mission yet
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE - FALLOUT
Now playing


As with any of the five previous installments in Tom Cruise's astonishingly popular Mission: Impossible franchise, the less you know about Mission: Impossible - Fallout before stepping into the theater the more likely you will have one heck of a terrific night out at the movies. Not because the plot is overly intricate and filled with unexpected twists and turns (in all honesty figuring out where this latest installment is headed is fairly easy), but more because you'll have less of an idea of the crackerjack practical stunts the filmmakers have devised for their international superstar actor to try and survive this time around. In this entry of the series these include more motorcycle action, a halo jump, bathroom fisticuffs, and a crackerjack helicopter chase where Cruise actually pilots the darned thing himself (but not before hanging off the side of it for a good two or three minutes before taking the controls). It's all as crazy as it sounds. Better, it's even more entertaining.

As good as this series has been, and as much as 2011's Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol has towered above them all for some time now, this sixth entry is the new high-water mark for the franchise. Returning writer/director Christopher McQuarrie (Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation) has raised the stakes to such an extent I'm almost flabbergasted by what he has achieved. In making the series' first direct sequel, it's almost as if he used his 2015 hit as a dry run for all he was going to attempt this time around. There is a fluidity and a cohesiveness to the storytelling that's spectacular. Couple that with the type of action the likes of which Howard Hawks, John Frankenheimer, and William Friedkin would stand up and cheer for and we have all the makings of a sensation that ranks right up there with some of the finest the genre has produced during the 21st century.

With the capture of Solomon Lane (Sean Harris), the Syndicate is in shambles. But a number of their operatives are still at large, and considering how dangerous they are it's no wonder putting them behind bars and spoiling their various terrorist plots has become the Impossible Mission Force's (IMF) number one priority. After an attempt to stop the group, now calling themselves the Apostles, from obtaining three plutonium cores goes off the rails, Ethan Hunt (Cruise) and his team now find their every move shadowed by the CIA. Remorseless killer August Walker (Henry Cavill) isn't just an observer, he's also around to make sure no one deviates from their mission to locate the plutonium before the Apostles can manufacture and detonate a trio of nuclear bombs. If they do, he's got orders from his boss Erica Sloan (Angela Bassett) to use whatever force he deems necessary, including lethal, to get them back on track.

There are complications, not the least of which is the fact Hunt and Walker unsurprisingly don't trust one another. But former MI6 agent Isla Faust (Rebecca Ferguson) is also hanging around for some reason, while a secretive arms dealer known as the White Widow (Vanessa Kirby) with links to Hunt's past holds vital information that hopefully will lead the IMF agents to the plutonium. Additionally, there's a mystery man calling himself John Lark who appears to be orchestrating events in ways that defy rational belief, the Apostles apparently looking to him as their new leader with Lane incarcerated. As much as Hunt is loath to admit it, the key to solving this mystery might just be contained in the head of the one man who came the closest to ruining his life and murdering all whom he held dear not so long ago: the aforementioned Solomon Lane, former head of the Syndicate.

Pulling from a variety of sources for inspiration (most notably John le Carré's spy novels, James Bond, John Boorman's Point Blank, and Jackie Chan's Police Story series), McQuarrie magically balances a myriad of varying characters and subplots without losing sight of the bigger picture. Interspersed between bouts of cleverly crafted pieces of exposition the director stages astonishing sequences of mayhem that get bigger, bolder, and more impressive as events catapult their way to a conclusion. The director also plants a number of witty callbacks to all five of the previous Mission: Impossible installments and does so in a way that feels authentically organic to this story, not merely placed there as some hackneyed piece of misbegotten fan service. Instead, these moments all help push the plot forward, and whether it be remembering the circumstances in which 'Job' met 'Max' or recollecting that Hunt enjoys taking vacations free-climbing walls of jagged rock, McQuarrie freely pulls from his hero's past to make his and his team's future prospects feel even more in jeopardy.

But it is the orgiastic nature of the action sequences that are undeniably the true draw here. The bare-knuckles bathroom showdown in which Hunt and Walker are barely able to fend off an unknown mystery assailant. A spellbinding sprint over the rooftops of London featuring a breakneck leap that resulted in Cruise breaking an ankle (which also happens to be the take used in the movie). A motorcycle chase through the streets of Paris that's a full-throttle, viscerally intense spine-tingler that puts near-perfect similar sequences in both Mission: Impossible II and Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation to absolute shame. A mountaintop face-off between predator and prey that culminates with some of the more jaw-dropping cliff dangling this side of 1993's Cliffhanger. A high-altitude aerial duel between a pair of helicopters with, as already mentioned, Cruise piloting one of the whirlybirds himself.

McQuarrie stages it all magnificently. With gigantic assists from cinematographer Rob Hardy (Annihilation), editor Eddie Hamilton (Kingsman: The Golden Circle), and composer Lorne Balfe (The Florida Project), the director achieves a primeval elegance that's heart-stopping. As much as I enjoyed many of his previous endeavors behind the camera, most notably his first Cruise collaboration Jack Reacher, never has McQuarrie showcased the level of craftsmanship, care, and attention to every minute detail as he does here.

I loved the way that the script ties up some of the loose ends left dangling from previous installments, most notably ones concerning Hunt's feelings for his in-hiding ex-wife Julia (Michelle Monaghan) and how she in turn continues to feel for him. I also adored how the director gave Luther Stickell (Ving Rhames) and Benji Dunn (Simon Pegg) new things to do while at the same time exploring just how important their friendship with their IMF team leader has become over the past two decades. Most of all, he allows the viewer insight into the toll these 22 years of government service have exacted upon our hero, and even if Hunt doesn't look like he has any intent to slow down anytime soon, it's equally clear that no matter how good the mask, the battle scars of his various ordeals can no longer be hidden quite like they used to be.

It's easy to think, especially after Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol with its exhilarating Burj Khalifa climbing sequence, and Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation with its dangling from the exterior door of an Airbus A400M Atlas during takeoff, that the only reason this series continues to fascinate audiences around the globe is the sight of a now-56-year-old Cruise laying his life on the line to do almost all of these stunts himself. As astonishing as that might be - it's admittedly something else and I don't think we've seen its like since Jackie Chan during his Police Story 3: Supercop heyday - I think the reason these films continue to resonate has more to do with the fact that they put character and story before the action, that component the key ingredient that I believe keeps bringing people back to see more.

While some installments are certainly more successful than others, at its absolute worst every entry in this series has still been a good one worthy of multiple watches. The same cannot be said about James Bond. It cannot be said about Jack Ryan. It cannot be said about Jason Bourne. Heck, it can't even be said about other long-running, big-budget Hollywood sci-fi fare like Star Trek, the Marvel Cinematic Universe, or even Star Wars. So when I say Mission: Impossible - Fallout isn't just the best film of the series but one of the great action epics of our time, know that I mean it, McQuarrie lighting the fuse on a piece of high-octane summertime entertainment we're going to be excitedly talking about for quite a while to come.


Suitably violent Equalizer 2 satisfyingly predictable
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE EQUALIZER 2 - Now playing

Currently residing in Boston, Robert McCall (Denzel Washington) is masquerading as a mild-mannered Lyft driver while still following through on his newfound calling of righting wrongs for people dealing with hopeless situations who otherwise would never see justice accomplished. He lives in a nondescript apartment building and makes nice with the other residents, paying particular attention to Miles Whitaker (Ashton Sanders), a young artist with potential whom he doesn't want to see go down the wrong path.

Robert's best friend remains his former government handler Susan Plummer (Melissa Leo). She and her academic husband Brian (Bill Pullman) are the only two people who know he is still alive. Heck, Susan's even been assisting Robert in his little egalitarian side business, providing him information on many of the cases he's hoping to solve. But when she becomes the target of lethal hired guns, the former assassin's ferocity will not be contained. Seeking out his former partner and Susan's most recent lieutenant Dave York (Pedro Pascal) for help, Robert will learn the identities of those involved in wanting to see his friend harmed and, when he does, nothing on this planet will stop him from delivering his own brand of lethal retribution.

The Equalizer 2 is the first sequel of Oscar-winning megastar Denzel Washington's career. A follow-up to the 2014 film, itself a big-screen update of the 1980s television series starring Edward Woodward, this second chapter in Robert McCall's story of redemption and violence is actually a slight improvement over its predecessor. Once again directed by frequent Washington collaborator Antoine Fuqua (Training Day, The Magnificent Seven) and scripted by returning writer Richard Wenk (16 Blocks, The Mechanic), the movie is a relatively easygoing action-thriller with a solid, if not exactly original, premise and features a small handful of craftily violent set pieces of mayhem and mischief that certainly do a good job of getting the blood flowing.

Not that there are any surprises. There was never a point where I didn't know how things were going to turn out. I knew instantly who the bad guys were. I knew what was going to happen to the various individuals who came into McCall's orbit. After an early discussion between Robert and Susan I even knew where Fuqua and Wenk were going to stage the climax. The only thing I didn't know was that they'd set this final showdown in the middle of a hurricane. But even that minor twist isn't as interesting or as sensational as it sounds, and while the wind blows, the rain falls, and the waves crash there is never any doubt how things will eventually turn out.

Yet I still liked this sequel. Washington is great as this character, slipping into McCall's skin with a stoic confidence that suits this commanding righter of wrongs perfectly. He glides through events with a determined precision that's almost Michael Myers-like in its unstoppable intensity, tapping into the emotional tragedies that have helped shape him into the person he currently is with a pinpoint sincerity that only materializes when absolutely necessary. McCall might not be a stretch for Washington and yet he clearly enjoys playing him, and if The Equalizer 2 ends up being a success it won't surprise me at all if the actor decides to portray the character for a third time sooner rather than later.

Wenk's script doesn't do the film a lot of favors, and the event that gets McCall's blood boiling for revenge is as clichéd as it is formulaic (and does a huge disservice to Leo, who up until this point is excellent), while our hero's moralistic sermonizing as it pertains to Miles is oftentimes tiresome. But there is a cutthroat finality to the way in which events steamroll towards a conclusion that's effectively startling, and I did love the stark simplicity of many of the key sequences, the screenplay viciously bleak in its depiction of violence and its aftereffects in ways few big-budget Hollywood spectacles ever are.

It's far from perfect, and as much as the first Equalizer left me rather indifferent there's nothing in this sequel that ever comes close to equaling the crackerjack, cartoonishly absurd Home Depot-set climax of that original. Even though he never shies away from showcasing the exploitive bloody carnage McCall so effortlessly unleashes upon his foes, Fuqua is still far more restrained behind the camera than I anticipated. There is a tonal consistency to The Equalizer 2 its predecessor never had. This, coupled with Washington's magnetically stalwart performance, resulted in a sequel I ended up enjoying just enough to exit the theater smiling, and as mid-afternoon matinees are concerned there's just enough that works here to make this predictably explosive thriller easy to recommend.


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Melissa Etheridge and special guest LeAnn Rimes rock Tulalip Resort Casino Amphitheatre
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SGN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS: Alki Beach Pride to feature 'American Idol' alum DeAndre Brackensick and singer/songwriter Lakin on July 21
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'A story about all of us' - Chatting Eighth Grade with writer/director Bo Burnham and actress Elsie Fisher
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Seattle Humane - Pets of the Week
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SEAMEC rating unfair to Steve Hoffman
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Introspectively incisive Eighth Grade an A-plus stunner
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Minimalist historical thriller Lighthouse a beacon of low-budget ingenuity
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John Callahan bio Don't Worry an emotionally bawdy celebration
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Fallout lights the fuse on Cruise's best Mission yet
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