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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, November 17, 2017 - Volume 45 Issue 46
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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SGN EXCLUSIVE: Catching up with Broadway, TV star, and musician, Reeve Carney at Steamposium 2017
by MK Scott - SGN Contributing Writer

Six years ago, Reeve Carney had just started out on Broadway in title role of the much-talked about Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark musical with the sensational score by Bono with The Edge which was originally directed by Julie Taymor (The Lion King). The show was plagued with a high-budget and the dangerous aerial stunts that even injured a stunt man. In August 2011, I was lucky enough to attend and review Spider-Man and the music and the leading man was what made the show. I met Reeve Carney after the show and he was very gracious. I later learned that his band, Carney, had performed as part of the pit orchestra for the show. I also learned that he is the grand-nephew of TV legend, Art Carney ('The Honeymooners'). In recent years, Carney left Broadway for the starring role of omnisexual, Dorian Gray on Showtime's Penny Dreadful (2014-16) and last year as Riff-Raff in the FOX TV remake of the Rocky Horror Picture Show. So, it was a delight to catch up with Reeve at Steamposium 2017 (also known as Steampunk-Con) at Seattle's Bell Harbor Conference center on October 28.

MK Scott: Okay. Reeve, you are known as the character of Dorian Gray for three seasons of 'Penny Dreadful.' But I had a chance to meet you about six years ago. You were starring on Broadway as Peter Parker is Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. So you ended up doing that for a couple more years after that?

Reeve Carney: Yeah, yeah. I was there until I got this job. So this is what - the only thing that could take me away from a job that fun - is [he knocks wood] something that ended up being for three years.

MK: Well, I know the character was quite complex.....

Reeve: Yeah, I think ... I guess most characters are probably pretty complex. But it was definitely fun to delve in to all the different aspects of what make up Dorian Gray.

MK: And you got to kiss Josh Hartlett?

Reeve: I did. I got to kiss a lot of people. [Laugh] He was the resident addict, I guess - no, not quite that. He was just very curious.

MK: And, also a little bit about, tell me a little bit more about the, I know that he was, for three seasons, unfortunately I haven't had a chance to see it.

Reeve: Oh, you've got to watch it on Netflix now!

MK: But Showtime started this. My fiancé just started watching this on Netflix, and he said, you know, I really like this character of Dorian Gray, and I said: Well, guess what? We're going to go meet him!

Reeve: Awesome! I'm glad he was excited.

MK: So, unfortunately, it only lasted for three seasons.

Reeve: Yeah, it would've been, I mean, you could, we had so much fun at that show.

MK: Is this something that you would've wanted to continue?

Reeve: I would've been happy for it to. Yeah. I mean, I think it ended in a way that made a lot of sense and felt complete, so I understand why that happened. It certainly would be cool to, I mean, there's sort of like a never-ending storyline when doing a character like Dorian Gray, you know, you could take it so many places.

MK: Now, what was the difference between being onstage versus being in front of the camera?

Reeve: Oh, I think being in front of the camera you have the option to focus more on naturalism. And everything happ - you know, tends to be a lot smaller, especially dramatic film as opposed to certain types of comedy. But the stage has to be more broad, you know, to tell the story. I find that I'm more, I don't know if I would say I'm more naturally inclined to be in film and TV - in a way I think that might be true, but I also spend more time playing music onstage. I am quite comfortable on the stage. So I do well being onstage. I'm working on something now, actually, in Edmonton, Alberta. Hadestown, That's a new musical.

MK: Broadway bound?

Reeve: I hope so. It looks like it. That's what they're saying. Certainly that would be the goal.

MK: So you also had a band, Carney. Is that something you're still working on?

Reeve: Well, I put out an album last year, a solo album, just under my name, Reeve Carney. And I'd love to collaborate more with the members of Carney, and my brother, and in any other formats. Because actually my brother and I are talking about working with our sister in some other formation of some other group, but it's just hard to find the time because we're all traveling so much in different places that that's the main reason we hadn't been a functioning band for a while. But I'm hoping that that comes back around in some forum.

MK: You've had your chance to do a little bit of TV and film. What else is on your horizon?

Reeve: Sure, yeah. Yeah. If the right project came along I think there is so much incredible writing for especially television at the moment, it seems to be, because I think people are really drawn to these story lines that are, that linger for a more extended period of time. You know, as opposed to a two-hour film you have potentially 30 hours of something. I mean, you know, I guess we have about 30 hours, I think. And sometimes you have more than that. 'Orange is the New Black,' what is that, in their sixth, seventh season, or something crazy?

MK: That's true. Actually, speaking of that, I had just read and didn't realize that you played Riff Raff in the Rocky Horror on Fox last year.

Reeve: That was so much fun.

MK: With our good friend Laverne Cox who I've interviewed many times.

Reeve: She's from New York, too. East Village, I think, originally ... She's very much a New Yorker.

MK: What was that experience like?

Reeve: Probably the most fun I've ever had because it was set up that way. It was set up to be this larger than life, insane thing, and Kenny Ortega just really made it that way with the cast. It was very communal. It just felt like a community of people having fun together.

MK: Aren't you glad that it wasn't live?

Reeve: Oh, yes. Well, not only for the fact for that crazy stuff that I had to do, that would've been tough. But I think that particular film, I mean, obviously it works onstage, but I don't know, it would be hard to film that. I think that might be hard to translate a live stage version of that film without doing it the way that the original film was made, even though the film wasn't the first. I know that there was a Rocky Horror Show first, but I don't know how you capture that. So I think it was a wise decision that they decided to film it the way they did.

MK: Like I said, I can't wait to see you with what's going on with Hadestown.

Reeve: Oh, thanks. Yeah. And Patrick Page, actually who played the Green Goblin in Spider-Man as Hades.

MK: Oh, my god!

Reeve: In the show, T.V. Carpio - I don't know, do you remember? - she ended up playing Arachne ultimately in Spider-Man and she is playing Ruisi in this. And it's totally unrelated. This was sort of us making suggestions when we knew they were looking for someone. And the three of us are doing another show together. It's just pretty cool.

MK: It was so good to see you.

Reeve: You, too.

To find out more about Hadestown, visit hadestown.com.

To find out more about Reeve Carney, visit reevecarney.com

For info on Steamposium 2018, visit seattle-steamposium.com

MK Scott is a Seattle-based arts blogger. Check out his blog at outviewonline.com


Perceptive BPM an emotionally relevant wrecking ball
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

BPM
Now playing


Writer/director Robin Campillo's (The Class) 2017 Cannes Film Festival Grand Jury prize winner BPM (Beats Per Minute) lives up to the hype. What could lazily be described as the Parisian flipside to David France's Oscar-nominated How to Survive a Plague, this movie, which is not a documentary, is a complex, emotionally resonant piece of historical fiction that packs a pretty devastating wallop. Set in 1992, the film isn't just about the birth of Act-Up in France, but also ends up being a social document chronicling the differing ways individuals banded together to combat the early days of the AIDS epidemic, forcing those holding the political and corporate purse strings to reevaluate their priorities even when they weren't initially inclined to do so.

Mixing fact and fiction, Campillo's story follows Nathan (Arnaud Valois), a youngster who isn't particularly politically active but finds himself infatuated with outspoken activist Sean (Nahuel Pérez Biscayart). He's one of the more radical members of the Act-Up movement, constantly pushing things further than the group's leaders Thibault (Antoine Reinartz) and Sophie (Adèle Haenel) are often comfortable with. He has his reasons, and they're as urgent as they are personal, Sean obsessed with changing the status quo so politicians have to get more involved in the fight against HIV and so drug companies will have to stop dragging their feet in bringing new treatments to market.

The strength of Campillo's epic drama is the way it is able to balance all its many storylines with such deft, introspective simplicity. Act-Up is working overtime to force pharmaceutical giant Melton-Pharm to publicly release their test results as it pertains to AIDS and HIV, knowing if they do so this insight into the disease could help medical professionals treat the afflicted better than they currently are able to while at the same time forcing politicians to recognize just how bad this growing epidemic is. At the same time all this is happening, Nathan and Sean slowly fall in love, while others in the movement, most notably Sophie, magnificently portrayed by Haenel, face their own personal travails.

Campillo doesn't shortchange any facet of his story. While the procedural pieces chronicling the fight against Melton-Pharm is thrilling, even better are a series of debates that get more engrossing, and more emotionally heated, as the film progresses. At the same time, Nathan sees his worldview expanded in ways he never thought possible, and whether sweating alongside Sean on a neon-lit dance floor, or coming to grips with the realities of the disease as he watches the newfound love of his life slowly waste away into a shell of his formerly virile self, this personal tale is juxtaposed beautifully with the larger, more documentary-like narrative that surrounds it.

Biscayart gives one of the best performances of 2017. Full of life, overflowing in energy and enthusiasm, he showcases AIDS's assault against Sean's body and soul with a selflessly raw ferocity that's oftentimes chilling. The actors share spectacular chemistry, the pair oozing a form of sexual camaraderie that's superb. Biscayart layers his portrayal with moments of humor that are just as apt to erupt into fiery anger as they are to open up to emotional despair, the two lovers sharing a final moment that ripped my heart to pieces with minimalistic urgency. As already stated, Haenel is also excellent, Sophie's journey nearly as fulfilling and as mesmeric as Nathan's and Sean's also proves to be.

I could have done without Arnaud Rebotini's (Eastern Boys) intrusive score, and I can't help but feel a key sex scene between Valois and Biscayart would have played a heck of a lot better without his music accompanying the moment. The film's opening flashback, while ultimately a moderately powerful introduction to the larger story these characters are all a part of, doesn't begin all that organically, and as such it took me a little while to get emotionally involved in what was going on and why I should care if Nathan ends up becoming a part of the Act-Up movement.

These prove to be minor annoyances more than they do anything else. Working with collaborator Philippe Mangeot (Summer Nights), Campillo's script adroitly explores this time and place in history with masterfully meditative resilience. No punches are pulled, and these characters are hardly saints, their collective sins as readily apparent as their otherwise more laudably selfless attributes undeniably prove to be. All of which augments the emotional components considerably, and by the time things build to their destructively complex conclusion euphoria and tragedy coexist with a naturalistic poise that's glorious. BPM (Beats Per Minute) wrecked me something fierce, Campillo's latest a piece of historical fiction that's just as relevant today as it ever was a quarter-century ago.


Moving Last Flag Flying a masterful and insightfully meditative wonder
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

LAST FLAG FLYING
Now playing


Thirty years after they served together during the Vietnam War, onetime Navy Corpsman Larry 'Doc' Shepherd (Steve Carell) and former Marine Sal Nealon (Bryan Cranston) and Reverend Richard Mueller (Laurence Fishburne) are unexpectedly reunited. Doc has sought these two men out, compelled to find them in the wake of an unspeakable tragedy he isn't certain he can face on his own. You see, his only son is dead. He was a Marine fighting in Iraq and the military is preparing to bury him with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery. Doc wants Sal and Richard to accompany him as he goes on a journey to lay his boy to rest, hoping that the past they shared will be enough to convince them to assist in this heartrending endeavor.

More a spiritual sequel to Hal Ashby's 1973 classic The Last Detail starring Jack Nicholson, Randy Quaid and the late Otis Young than it is a direct continuation, Richard Linklater's Last Flag Flying is a movingly meditative drama full of heartbreaking insight and cathartic truth I found extraordinary. It is a story of service and friendship that transcends the simple story at its center to become something deeply personal and emotionally affecting, the level of introspective honesty on display throughout altogether staggering. This movie moved me to tears while in the same breath it had me laughing out loud, everything building to a stunningly personal denouement that left me speechless.

Working with author Darryl Ponicsan to craft the screenplay, Linklater doesn't try to obfuscate any of this story's more intimate particulars. Instead, things are purposefully straightforward right from the jump. Doc needs help. He shares a history with Sal and Richard they'd rather not talk about but one that both men still refuse to run away from. Thirty years on, they still don't know what they went to Vietnam to fight for. Now, in 2003, they don't know why Doc's son was in Iraq or what it was he laid down his life to protect. Yet all of them refuse to bend and they have no desire to break. They will do what is right, selflessly continuing to serve their country and their fellow soldiers best they know how even if their own days of military service are long behind them.

Equal parts funny, perceptive, heartbreaking and emotional, Linklater and Ponicsan have no wish to preach even if their opinions as to the validity of these two wars aren't ever in doubt. Instead, they want to examine these men, long to get inside their heads and figure out what it is that continues to propel them forward even if the ghosts of the past and tragedies of the present conspire to rip them to shreds. The trio's conversations sparkle with an introspective truth that is frequently startling, while at the same time also showcases a cheery comradeship that even the passage of three decades of life as strangers hasn't been able to blunt.

Unsurprisingly, this is a major showcase for the three actors. Cranston is magnificent, his epically exuberant performance a verbose cavalry charge of truth and consequence that's a consistent marvel. He's matched by Fishburne, the two showcasing a Mutt and Jeff give and take that's dazzling. These men may have gone their separate ways after they left the Marines, they may have pursued different agendas and goals in order to dull the painful memories of the mistakes they might have made, but that doesn't mean they still don't know one another better and more intimately than either would care to admit. Bravely going into interior places filled with darkness, pain and guilt, Cranston and Fishburne are extraordinary, and I could have watched an additional two hours of Sal and Richard on the road back home after they've finished assisting Doc in his mournful task.

Carell might be even better. Doc spends much of the movie playing things close to the vest, containing his grief inside as the trio makes the slow trek to bury his boy with the respect and the dignity he deserves. It's a thoughtful portrait, his character having a complicated backstory that includes the man overcoming a dark cloud of disgrace born from his time with Sal and Richard in Vietnam and becoming a valued and respective member of his community. Carell's eyes speak volumes, the emotions flowing out of the actor sending chills up and down my spine on more than one occasion, and even just a simple moment where Doc must decide whether or not to bury his son in his military dress or in civilian attire bringing me to tears with winsome grace.

Linklater structures his film in much the same manner he did his classic trilogy of Before Sunrise, Before Sunset and Before Midnight, absolutely unafraid to showcase a dialogue-driven drama where ideas are discussed with complex intelligence. He and Ponicsan find humor in the most unlikely of places yet at the same time never belittle or make light of the darker facets of the story they are telling. They allow for moments of humanity to break through in ways that are startling, gifting young actor J. Quinton Johnson with a key supporting role as a soldier tasked with assisting in the transport of the body that's far more emotionally resonant than I initially imagined it was going to be. Last Flag Flying is a masterful motion picture, watching it unfold for the first time a pleasurably moving joy I'll treasure for many years to come.


Energetically incoherent Justice League charmingly heroic
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

JUSTICE LEAGUE
Now playing


After the death of Clark Kent/Superman (Henry Cavill) at the hands of Doomsday, both Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck) and Diana Prince (Gal Gadot) are well aware the Earth is in jeopardy in a way it never has been before. With signs of an invasion everywhere, the two heroes attempt to find other individuals with special abilities to help protect humanity now that the Man of Steel is gone. The three they're focused on are Barry Allen (Ezra Miller), Arthur Curry (Jason Momoa) and Victor Stone (Ray Fisher), each possessing the sort of skills that should be able to help Bruce and Diana hold back the forces of evil.

But an invasion isn't just forthcoming, it's already begun. The planet destroyer Steppenwolf (Ciarán Hinds) has descended from the interstellar unknown and laid waste to both the hidden island of Themyscira and the lost underwater city of Atlantis in search of powerful artifacts known as 'Mother Boxes,' a third one buried in the bowels of the earth by mankind 5,000 years ago the last remaining key that will help this demon cover the world in fire and darkness. With Queen Hippolyta (Connie Nielsen) able to send her daughter a message signaling the fight for the planet's survival has commenced, it becomes clear to Diana that as strong as Bruce, Barry, Arthur, Victor and she herself are, they might not be enough to stop Steppenwolf.

Justice League is a mess; there's no denying that. With director Zack Snyder having to step away from the production after a horrible family tragedy and Joss Whedon brought in to tidy up the script, handle reshoots of some key scenes and oversee the editing process, there is a notable tonal disconnect throughout that's rather obvious. It's hard to know where the filmmaker responsible for Man of Steel and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice sees his influence on things begin and the guy known for creating 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' and crafting The Avengers has his end, and while Snyder gets sole directorial credit it's hard not to imagine this version of the story is far removed from the one he likely originally imagined.

All of which makes it surprising things work out nearly as well as they do. While disjointed and more than a little structurally incoherent, gosh darn it all if Justice League doesn't end up proving to be a heck of a lot more fun than it has any right to be. Moving at a breakneck pace, Whedon and fellow screenwriter Chris Terrio (Argo), working from a story initially conceived by Terrio and Snyder, assemble their team of heroes quickly, eschewing much in the way of narrative excess in order to get to the action sooner rather than later. They gloss over the backstory of the Mother Boxes as well as the chaos and carnage caused by Steppenwolf's first visit to Earth 5,000 years in the past, hoping audiences don't really notice they aren't spending a lot of times explaining anything that is happening. The pair also introduce their new heroes in speedy shorthand, thinking that the talents of Miller, Momoa and Fisher will be enough to make them memorable and worth caring about all by themselves.

For the most part this plan succeeds. Victor Stone, a.k.a. Cyborg, gets the shortest straw, which is something of a shame as his role in seeing Steppenwolf's plans fail is an important one. Arthur Curry, a.k.a. Aquaman, fairs a lot better, and considering his solo adventure is set to hit theatres in December of 2018 it's hardly surprising his underwater world of Atlantis is the most fully realized new location in the movie outside of Themyscira, already introduced this past summer in the box office smash Wonder Woman. As for Barry Allen, a.k.a. The Flash, he's given the most to do, a subplot involving his wrongfully incarcerated father Henry (Billy Crudup) and the youngster's general inability to fit in with others giving him an idiosyncratic edge that's consistently engaging.

Even so, Miller, Momoa and Fisher all make suitably solid impressions, and say what you will about Snyder's directorial style his eye for casting these important roles is second to none Each manages to craft distinct characterizations that are separate from any of their cast mates yet still fits in beautifully with the idea that each of them must put their differences aside in order to become a crime-fighting team unlike any other the world has ever seen before. Miller, in particular, steals scenes right out from underneath his costars with charismatic ease, adding a layer of humor and warmth to the proceedings that is frankly wonderful.

But this whole adventure feels vigorous and welcoming in a way that neither Man of Steel nor Batman v Superman ever did. It's clear that things have shifted, the production even going so far as to tug at the emotional nostalgia cord, composer Danny Elfman crafting a wonderfully boisterous score that uses John Williams' Superman theme as well as Hans Zimmer and Tom Holkenborg's 'Is She With You?' Wonder Woman track to magnificent effect. Heck, he even gets to throw his own Batman theme into the mix as well, in some ways suggesting this incarnation of The Dark Knight is the same one Tim Burton introduced in 1989, thus making Justice League in some ways more of an unintentional sequel to it than it is to Snyder's Batman v Superman.

These are all conscious decisions made by both the studio and the filmmakers, I'm certain, and they frequently work. By keeping things energetic and fun, by allowing the cast to look and appear as if they're having a terrific time making the film, all of this ends up having quite the effect upon an audience. It's hard to care that little of the plot makes any real sense, or that Steppenwolf, all of the talented Hinds' belligerent bellicose bluster notwithstanding, is another in a long line of underwhelming bad guys these comic book adventures, whether they be DC or Marvel, always seem to be putting front and center. Most of this shockingly doesn't matter, the pure unadulterated esprit de corps that's on display somehow helping to gloss over this production's more than obvious (and ample) shortcomings.

Who knows where things go next, or if the combination of Wonder Woman and to a lesser degree Justice League signals that DC and Warner Bros have finally figured out what it is they are doing and that future adventures featuring these heroes will meet with success. But even with a number of reservations, and even though I haven't the first clue who, Snyder or Whedon, should get the majority of the credit, dang it all if I didn't find watching Batman, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Aquaman and Cyborg joining forces to be a rollicking, freewheeling blast, and you don't even need to tie me up with the Lasso of Hestia for me to admit it.


Risibly tedious Daddy's Home 2 a laughless slog
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

DADDY'S HOME 2
Now playing


It's possible that Daddy's Home 2 is one of the more blatantly rancid and painfully ugly comedies I've ever had the displeasure to sit through. Doubling down on the more risible aspects of the otherwise inoffensive, moderately amusing yet instantly forgettable 2015 first film, returning director Sean Anders (We're the Millers) and the rest of his creative team have delivered a sequel that's pretty close to unwatchable. Trading in disgustingly tired and offensive gender stereotypes that only feel more egregious in light of current cultural events, filled with childish behavior by its two leads that is trite and obnoxious in a way that is not remotely amusing, this film comes amazingly close to being a disaster. It just isn't good, and for the life of me I can't begin to imagine just how terrible a third entry in this series would prove to be if this second one ends up being a hit which by all appearances it is sadly almost certain to be.

After ironing out their differences and working overtime to be the best pair of co-dads they can be, Brad (Will Ferrell) and Dusty (Mark Wahlberg) have done a fine job becoming the type of men they feel their large cadre of children can be proud of. Both are determined to have the best Christmas celebration ever, deciding that instead of the children having to commute back and forth from one man's home to the other, the entire clan will make merry together as one gigantic unit. To that end, Brad and Dusty have invited their own fathers, the former's touchy-feely pop Don (John Lithgow) and the latter's wild-eyed bad boy of a dad Kurt (Mel Gibson), to be a part of the festivities, the two older gentlemen flying into town to be with their children and grandchildren for the holiday.

Things do not go as planned. Egged on a little by Kurt, Dusty starts trying to prove once again he's the alpha male. Not wanting to appear intimidated, Brad follows suit. Once again, the two men start trying to one-up one another by being as boorishly masculine as they can be while their children look upon them with a mixture of disgust and embarrassment. Even Brad's wife Sara (Linda Cardellini) and Dusty's new bride Karen (Alessandra Ambrosio) are mortified by their behavior, both women quickly coming to their wit's end as they try to deal with all the chaos and carnage their husbands are leaving in their wake as Christmas Day approaches.

Why do we have yet another comedy where the idea of males being affectionate or showing emotion is supposed to be funny? Why are we playing up so many unctuous gender stereotypes that proclaim anything even slightly feminine is to be looked down upon or ridiculed? Why is it supposed to be cute that forty-something man-children can behave like such bratty imbeciles? Why are the women in this film treated even worse this second time around than they were the first, the immensely talented Cardellini once again forced to deliver thankless bits of dialogue that are as embarrassing as they are juvenile? Why does so much of this movie assume its audience is a bunch of morons who need to be continually pandered to, never allowing for anything to happen that doesn't feel borrowed or stolen from other popular holiday comedies like National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation or A Christmas Story?

I've always responded to Ferrell and Wahlberg as a comedic team, but they're really starting to wear out their welcome with this travesty. Their performances grate in a way that grows tiresome as the film progresses. Even for a silly, people-doing-stupid-things-cluelessly comedy, the depths this one descends to are so overtly moronic putting up with either man for all 100 minutes of the running time is practically impossible. They're both so tediously insufferable their performances almost make me regret giving a good review to The Other Guys and a pleasantly passable one to the first Daddy's Home. I was that frustrated and dissatisfied by all that I was sitting there witnessing, and if only for the fact I've never walked out of a movie, it's a wonder I sat in the theatre all the way until the end.

Gibson is arguably the lone bright spot, the only one who underplays his role, refusing to mug for the camera, the actor allowing laughs to spring forth far more organically than they otherwise have any right to. But his appearance in what is being billed as a comedy fit for the whole family brings up a number of additional issues that I haven't the first clue as the best way to address. He's a problematic presence inside the motion picture for reasons that have nothing to do with the movie's overall mediocrity and everything to do with a person's ability to separate art from the artist, and while I was just fine watching Gibson in recent efforts like Blood Father and The Expendables 3 I'd be lying if I didn't admit to having a heck of a time trying to feel comfortable with his presence here.

Granted, the movie being so unrelentingly terrible eases that burden somewhat, Anders and his team of screenwriters manufacturing a sequel that isn't just content to sit at the bottom of the entertainment barrel but actually one that frequently digs even deeper into dirt seemingly in an attempt to see just how low it can go. Daddy's Home 2 is a lump of seasonal coal delivered into the multiplex with all the pomp and circumstance of a slap to the face, this holiday-themed comedy a laughless slog better left unwatched.


Lorna Luft: On her family, Irving Berlin and performing in 5th Avenue Theatre's Holiday Inn
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Stop the presses: Newsies takes over Village
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Teatro ZinZanni: Familiar show, new home, fun evening
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Get holi-dazed with these upcoming seasonal live performances
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SGN EXCLUSIVE: Catching up with Broadway, TV star, and musician, Reeve Carney at Steamposium 2017
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Seattle Humane - Pets of the Week
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SGN EXCLUSIVE: Catching up with Del Shores and Emerson Collins on A Very Sordid Wedding at TWIST 2017
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The Bodyguard fails to protect - the audience
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Once a Christian music star, Trey Pearson now sings a different kind of heavenly tune
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SGN EXCLUSIVE: Catching up with Broadway, TV star, and musician, Reeve Carney at Steamposium 2017
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Perceptive BPM an emotionally relevant wrecking ball
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Moving Last Flag Flying a masterful and insightfully meditative wonder
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Energetically incoherent Justice League charmingly heroic
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