Tuesday, Dec 12, 2017
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 43 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, October 6, 2017 - Volume 45 Issue 40
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
Bleakly comic American Made a cruise-powered satire
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

AMERICAN MADE
Now playing


In 1978, TWA pilot Barry Seal (Tom Cruise) is approached by a gregarious, excitably determined, well-dressed stranger calling himself 'Schafer' (Domhnall Gleeson). He knows a lot about Barry, including some extracurricular activities involving some of his flights that aren't exactly legal. But he's just fine with that. In fact, he'd like to make the pilot a proposition and put him to work for his country. Only caveat? Barry can't tell anyone about what it is he's doing. Not his friends. Not his shrink. Not his priest. And sure as heck not his wife Lucy (Sarah Wright Olsen).

Thus begins the crazy true story American Made, a rambunctious and rowdy piece of satirical biography that reunites Cruise with his Edge of Tomorrow director Doug Liman, the movie a cheerfully chilly jaunt through the heart of darkness that proves to be one of the fall season's most entertaining surprises. Playing like the bleakly comic antitheses to 1986's unapologetically jingoistic box office classic Top Gun that initially helped propel its star to international stardom, Seal's story is the American Dream flipped on its head, Gary Spinelli's sharply observant script cutting its protagonist little slack as it makes its way towards its suitably hardhearted conclusion.

Seal is basically an opportunist who leaps into things without taking the time to look where he might be landing. When the mysterious Schafer comes his way asking him to clandestinely take aerial photographs of communist guerilla camps in countries throughout Central America for the CIA? Sure. Great idea. When he's then tasked with delivering bribes to Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega in exchange for inside information pertaining to his country? Certainly. All part of the job. When a trio of Columbians, a group that includes Pablo Escobar (Mauricio Mejía), ask him to help them get their cocaine into the United States without law enforcement catching on? Hey, as long as the CIA is fine with him doing it, there's no reason for him to not earn a little extra cash. When the U.S. Government gets the idea to run guns to the Contras fighting in Nicaragua and they want him to be the one to do it? Seal will just add it to his to-do list. After all, he's the man who always delivers.

All of this and more happened, the former airline pilot transforming himself into a spy, smuggler and money laundering entrepreneur in less than a decade. Seal played all sides against one another, finding new angles to make money as he did so, in the process becoming one of the wealthiest men in American without anyone knowing it other than his CIA handler and his wife Lucy. She forces him to reveal the truth after their family is forced out of their Louisiana home overnight in order to stay one step ahead of the Drug Enforcement Agency relocating on CIA orders to middle of nowhere Arkansas, realizing at that moment her husband is no longer working for TWA.

Told through videotapes left by Seal in order to make sure there was documentation for everything he's asked to do (as well as for the tasks he decides to take on all on his own), Spinelli's script is structured somewhat like Martin Scorsese's 1990 classic Goodfellas and Adam McKay's 2015 Oscar-winner The Big Short. It's also similarly light and bouncy in presentation while also containing a cold-blooded satirical edge, same as they both did. But where those movies dug deep to get to the center of the matter, looking for the truth in every harebrained scheme, incident of financial malfeasance, death-defying escape from justice, and blood-curdling instance of automatic weapon fire, this one never quite shows the same passionate urgency to do the same.

Even so, this does not mean Liman and Spinelli pull their punches; it just means a few of them don't hit nearly as hard as I hoped they would. The pair shortchange Lucy, and as good as Olsen might be, the character never comes alive in the same way Lorraine Bracco's Karen Hill did in Goodfellas. She was the perfect counterpoint to Ray Liotta's Henry, his descent into gangster largess slowly but surely corrupting her as well. Much the same happens to Lucy, and while at first her husband's willingness to sell himself to the highest bidder, even to Columbian drug cartels, while also being the CIA's Central American lapdog sickens her, after a while the financial windfall works its evil magic upon her. With that in mind, this should be her story just as much as it is Barry Seal's, their relationship, the fact it was able to withstand so much carnage, chaos, weirdness and insanity, the thing I found myself most interested to learn more about only to be frustrated when this doesn't happen.

Thankfully, Liman has Cruise, and he knows just how to utilize him. Much like Edge of Tomorrow, he takes what people have liked and been drawn to about the actor, his cocksure confidence, his roguish charm, his smug self-assurance in his belief that his actions are always the right ones, and then proceeds to deconstruct it bit by deliriously devilish bit. Seal is a cad, but his captivating magnetism is still undeniable. That only makes the man's senseless selfish stupidity all the more destructive, both for himself and his family. Cruise embodies all of this with ease, delivering a complex, ferociously dynamic performance that ends up being a vibrant, electrically kinetic reminder of just how great an actor he can be when he's sufficiently challenged.

Then there is the story itself, a piece of history that proves once again that truth is always stranger than fiction. If Spinelli's script doesn't necessarily do a wonderful job of depicting the complexities of the relationship between the Seals, it happily goes in the exact opposite direction where it comes to showing the inherent hypocrisy of U.S. foreign policy during this time period. I continually rolled my eyes at Schafer's machinations, the gleeful way in which he subverts the rule of law, international diplomacy and just common decency. It's all amusingly terrifying, the sheer joy Gleeson showcases portraying the character equally so.

Liman has always proven to be an idiosyncratically fascinating filmmaker, moving between small independently produced projects like Swingers, Go, Fair Game and The Wall and larger, studio-financed efforts like The Bourne Identity, Mr. & Mrs. Smith and Edge of Tomorrow with relative ease. American Made sits someplace in the middle of these two sensibilities, the film showcasing a political engagement that's moderately abnormal for a Hollywood production while at the same time remaining a spectacle-fueled vehicle for its above-the-title star, Cruise. If it isn't always as focused or as deep as I wanted it would be, that does not make the finished feature any less invigorating, this romp into arrogant American excess a tragic flight of fancy well worth taking.


Intense Super Dark Times a terrifying teenage drama
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

SUPER DARK TIMES
Now playing


Teenagers Zach (Owen Campbell) and Josh (Charlie Tahan) have been best friends for as long as they can remember. Sitting someplace in the middle between being a part of the high school in-crowd and social outcasts, they more or less get to go about their daily lives in some semblance of peace, free from the pressures of being in any one clique or having to face a bully's violent insults as they make their way towards graduation. There is tension between them, though, lovely fellow student Allison (Elizabeth Cappuccino) catching the eye of both boys.

But that's not the worst of it. There's a new danger, and it involves their other friends Daryl (Max Talisman) and Charlie (Sawyer Barth). While messing around with some of Josh's older brother's toys, including a razor-sharp samurai sword, something happens while the group is outside in the woods adjacent to town. This event adds a macabre pall over the pair's friendship, and it's one that has Zach particularly nervous. Things are going on in town that have him spooked, and now he's concerned something is going to happen to Allison, and for all he knows Josh is the one right at the center of all the madness.

Even though it's set in the early 1990s and concerns itself with a close-knit group of kids dealing with the indescribable, director Kevin Phillips's feature-length debut Super Dark Times is not some erstwhile 'Stranger Things' variation. It is instead an exceedingly dark, uncomfortably tense coming of age drama about teenagers making the worst decision imaginable only to discover the repercussions of keeping such indescribably terrifying secrets exorbitantly leads to madness and tragedy. This is a bleak, uncompromising drama that isn't for the faint of heart or the easily offended, the place things end up at one no child of any age should ever have to experience.

It's undeniably effective, Ben Collins and Luke Piotrowski's script doing a fine job of setting the stage by making sure Zach and Josh's friendship is a real one, the bond they share immediately apparent right from the first off-color joke bantered back and forth between them. As part of that, there's also real tension that runs between them, too, each knowing the other so well that it becomes virtually impossible to hide any of the emotions they might be feeling at any given time. I liked the fact that, where Zach feels compelled to give borderline outcast kids like Daryl and Charlie the benefit of friendly companionship, Josh isn't so certain this is always a good idea. There is real tension here, neither quite believing what the other is seeing is real, all of which ends up helping inadvertently fuel the tragedy that will change the lives of all four teens forever.

I'm not as fond of the third act twist, and while I'm perfectly okay with the psychological chaos that sinks its teeth into one of the two boys, I'm not altogether certain the Halloween dynamics of it all suits the dramatic scenario Collins and Piotrowski have concocted. This moment of carnage feels forced, untidy, and while Phillips composes the sequences with laudable restraint and attention to detail, the switch from tightly wound catastrophic drama to full-blown high school-aged horror happens far too inelegantly and with too much rapidity for my contentment.

Even so, there is a refreshing candor to this film that's wonderful. I was fascinated watching Zach attempt to navigate his way through a maze he played far too large a role in the creation of, his understanding of what his and Josh's decision to keep a dreadful secret has unleashed immediately obvious. Additionally, relative newcomer Campbell, likely best known for extended arcs on 'Boardwalk Empire' and 'The Americans,' proves to be an intriguing talent worthy of keeping an eye on. He manages to give Zach a multidimensional complexity I found compelling, and whether he's timidly waltzing towards romance with Allison or uncovering inconsistencies in Josh's temperament he'd never taken note of before, the young actor soars.

Granted, the entire cast is solid, Tahan and Cappuccino particularly so. I also liked that the primary adults that are involved with this story, while requisitely clueless as to all it is their kids are doing, they're all for the most part still concerned enough with their respective lives to have at least the faintest inklings that something might be wrong. It helps give things an extra layer of realism that helps make the third act transition a little easier to swallow, otherwise it's fairly likely I might have ended up more on the angry side of frustrated which wasn't a place I wanted to go. Super Dark Times might not earn its blood-soaked finale, but that doesn't make what happens up to that point any less compelling, Phillips in the end proving himself to be a strong directorial talent worth keeping an eye on.


Ambitious Blade Runner 2049 a stunning sequel
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

BLADE RUNNER 2049
Now playing


Los Angeles. 2049. A Blade Runner (Ryan Gosling) is tasked by his commander Lt. Joshi (Robin Wright) to continue to hunt down renegade Replicants and send them into 'retirement.' In order to complete his mission, he discovers the need to track down a fellow Blade Runner, former LAPD detective Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), still considered the best man to have ever held this position. But he went missing in 2019 after completing his most difficult assignment, covering his tracks so well no one has uttered his name, let alone seen him alive, these past 30 years.

Still inspired by the classic novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by the great Philip K. Dick, with a script conceived by returning screenwriter Hampton Fancher and co-written with Logan scribe Michael Green, all of it overseen by executive producer Ridley Scott who turns over the directorial reins to Sicario and Arrival impresario Denis Villeneuve, Blade Runner 2049 is every bit as ambitious as the 1982 science fiction classic it follows in the footsteps of. It is a movie overflowing in big ideas and stunning images, its story still transpiring within a dystopian noir future where the line between human and artificial has been blurred into nothingness. This is a worthy, thoughtful and intelligently composed sequel, and much like Scott's original film this follow-up is guaranteed to provoke passionately heated debate and discussion that will continue long into the foreseeable future.

This chapter in Rick Deckard's ongoing tale is even more convoluted than the story charted out in the previous Blade Runner. Its themes are bigger. Its ideas are bolder. Its concepts even more adventurous. But it can also feel moderately pretentious and self-important, Fancher and Green's script wrapping itself into circles in order to ensure all of the various pieces fit together while at the same time still relate back to the 1982 film. It's all pretty clever, but it can also feel moderately mechanical, some of the bits contained within the story's midsection not always cracking with the same vigor as the stuff surrounding it almost consistently is.

Even so, Villeneuve is a directorial magician, and even at over 160 minutes in length this sequel never feels padded or overlong. While methodically paced, there is still a driving intensity that's undeniable. Villeneuve never wavers, refuses to turn away, the sights and sounds he chooses to showcase all adding another layer to the mystery, each answer he offers up signaling a new question that also needs to be resolved. He weaves through Fancher and Green's screenplay with mesmerizing skill, and no matter what visual wonders are unleashed or how many psychological conundrums are posited, it is the human story at the center that always stays in focus.

It is this idea of what makes one human that is at the core of what is going on. Pulling even more from Dick's source material than the initial film did, all of the concepts and ideas relating to consciousness, to whether or not it can be proven what sort of creature has a soul and which kind does not, those are the topics of most concern. Replicants are made, grown in a lab and engineered to take orders. But can they evolve? Do they have a consciousness that is unique unto them and to no other? Do they long for the touch of another? Do they lust? Do they love? Heck, do they actually dream of electric sheep? These are the burning questions that Villeneuve and company keep in constant focus, and everything that ends up transpiring throughout the film has everything to do with the answers theorized by humans and Replicants alike.

I can't say enough about the performances. Gosling, Ford, Wright, all three are outstanding, as are fellow supporting players like Dave Bautista, Jared Leto, Ana de Armas, Mackenzie Davis and especially the spellbinding Dutch actress Sylvia Hoeks. Thing is, as great as they all are, and as complex as their performances all become, I can't tell you a thing about anything it is they are doing. To spend even a syllable doing so would spoil a number of the film's more captivating surprises, each second of the motion picture delivering one reveal after another, and these actors and the characters they are all portraying each feed into that in a multitude of unforeseen ways.

What I can say is that Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Prisoners) once again proves why he is considered one of the all-time greats behind the camera. It would have been easy for the veteran cinematographer to have rested on his laurels, been content to offer up visual compositions that emulated Jordan Cronenweth's spectacular visions from the original motion picture without putting his own distinctive stamp on the material. Instead, each image is its own clue to solving the narrative riddle, Villeneuve granting him the freedom to make this world his own just as long as the visuals all add something to the story and don't just stand out because they're inventively gorgeous.

It took Blade Runner time to finally be recognized as a classic. Its original 1982 incarnation was not what was intended, but thanks to the dedicated cult following the film achieved over the years, Ridley Scott was allowed to present something close to what he wanted in 1992. In 2007, he was able to return to the film one more time, offering up what he called his 'Final Cut,' and while this version didn't differ too significantly from the one he released 15 years prior, that does not make it any less definitive.

I feel pretty safe in stating Villeneuve isn't going to have to worry about re-cutting his sequel. It's hard to imagine this motion picture isn't exactly what the director intended, Blade Runner 2049 an enthralling science fiction tour de force that will likely only get better and more emotionally invigorating with each additional viewing. While I still have questions, I felt the same way when I discovered the original film way back when I was still in elementary school. Over time, I've come to regard that one as a masterpiece, even the so-called 'flawed' versions Scott was never satisfied with. Part of me feels I'm going to end up feeling the same about what Villeneuve has done here as well, and unlike tears in rain my excitement and enthusiasm for this franchise is not likely to vanish anytime soon.


Resurrected Flatliners frustratingly D.O.A.
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

FLATLINERS
Now playing


For a film that apparently did not screen for domestic press whatsoever, director Niels Arden Oplev's (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Dead Man Down) remake/sequel/reimagining of the 1990 cult favorite Flatliners isn't nearly as bad as doing such a thing would lead most to believe. That does not, however, mean it is surprisingly worthwhile or even moderately entertaining. Much like the Joel Schumacher version starring Kiefer Sutherland, Julia Roberts and Kevin Bacon, Oplev's film is attractively cast, has an intriguing idea at its center and begins rather well before repeatedly shooting itself in the foot as it makes its way to its impressively stupid melodramatic conclusion. Screenwriter Ben Ripley (Source Code) reworks Peter Filardi's original story and does nothing to improve on it, and as such it is impossible not to wonder why this new take was given the greenlight in the first place.

Haunted by the tragic death of her little sister in a car accident, genius first-year resident med student Courtney (Ellen Page) is obsessed with learning what happens to a person's consciousness as they transition into death. Utilizing research articles born from a similar project she discovers in some old medical journal, she decides to take these tests into the future utilizing modern technologies and techniques honed by physicians over the past two-plus decades. Tricking friends Jamie (James Norton) and Sophie (Kiersey Clemons) to assist her, Courtney is going to die for a full minute, recording her brainwaves during the transitory period while also trusting her two fellow students can bring her back to life before it's too late.

Joined later by two more ambitious residents, Ray (Diego Luna) and Marlo (Nina Dobrev), the experiment proves to be a success. Emboldened by what Courtney has accomplished, one by one all of the students decide to take the plunge into death for successively longer period of times. But these journeys into the limbo between life and death are not without their risks, and soon all who take the plunge are having bizarre, violent visions that feel all-too-real. Courtney begins to believe the group has brought something back with them, and if they can't put the pieces together and solve this scientific puzzle soon, a more permanent form of death they won't be able to come back from will likely come calling.

Plot-wise, this isn't all that different than what Filardi conjured up back in 1990. But while an intriguing concept ripe with potential, Ripley's script is more than content to run in virtually the exact same circles without attempting to go in a different or potentially more interesting direction. Other than an unexpected incident involving one of the main characters that's far more deadly than anticipated, the melodramatic superciliousness of the central emotional constructs are as tired and unintentionally laughable as ever. Things still boil down to the fact past sins are the ghosts that will haunt us forever, with forgiveness, either from the aggrieved party or from one's self, the only way to stave off madness.

Page is very good, as is Luna, while Clemons has some terrific early moments before the story suddenly throws her character under a metaphorical bus, making Sophie a whiny childish jerk who becomes increasingly unlikable. Still, these three are the standouts as far as the actors are concerned, each fully invested emotionally as they attempt to give their respective characterizations complexity and nuance. Unfortunately, Dobrev and Norton do not fair near as well, the former a particularly weak link, her performance becoming even more frustrating and off-putting as Marlo's story evolves into something loathsome and selfishly disgusting as it moves along.

As impressively modern and as technologically advanced much of Niels Sejer's (A Royal Affair) production design is, I can't say Oplev uses any of these interiors in an eye-catching manner. He and cinematographer Eric Kress (Colossal) aren't in a showy mood, attempting to ground all of this science fiction-horror-melodrama craziness in a practical, tactile reality that's nowhere nearly as fantastical as the one manufactured by Schumacher for his version. While an interesting change of pace, it also allows the sheer idiocy of the scenario to take center stage with brutal rapidity, augmenting a weakness in a way that makes it more noticeable than it otherwise might have been.

Still, Oplev opens the movie nicely, Courtney's initial foray into the unknown viscerally enthralling, Diego, Marlo, Jamie and Sophie's frantic attempts to bring her back to the land of the living equally so. But it all falls off a narrative cliff with stunning speed, the last half a frantic, schlocky mess that slams the viewer over the head time and time again with its syrupy emotional excess. The goodwill generated by the opening act is quickly forgotten about, the last scenes having me rolling my eyes in stupefied disbelief as I tried to contain a few involuntary giggles.

Still, nothing about this Flatliners is painful; I didn't hate myself for taking the time to see it. If anything, the only thing the movie did was make me question what it actually was. Is it a sequel? While the character Kiefer Sutherland shows up portraying has a different name than the one he played in 1990, there are some notable similarities between the two which made me wonder if they might be one and the same. Or is it a full-blown remake, completely unattached to Shumacher's original in every way? No reference is made to the prior experiment and other than Sutherland's appearance and the odd, purposefully vague medical journal article connections between what happened 27 years ago and now are few and very far between.

Not that it matters. This Flatliners makes all of the exact same mistakes as the original, stranding its talented and attractive cast in ways that grow increasingly ridiculous as things move towards a climax. I still think the core of the story remains interesting; it's just how its developed and brought to life that's a waste of time. While nowhere near so terrible to warrant keeping the film hidden from press before its release, that doesn't make it some unheralded, unappreciated gem, either. This new version is sadly D.O.A., and I can't imagine anyone is going to have the desire to resurrect this story from the afterlife again for a third attempt anytime soon.


Initially compelling Mountain an emotionally facile survival yarn
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE MOUNTAIN BETWEEN US
Now playing


Thanks to a massive snowstorm about to hit the region, photojournalist Alex Martin (Kate Winslet) and neurosurgeon Ben Bass (Idris Elba) are stranded at a nondescript Idaho airport even though they simply must get to Denver by morning. She's getting married. He's got an important surgery. Even though they're complete strangers, a combination of panic and need leads them to pool resources and charter a plane flown by the charming Walter (Beau Bridges), the affable pilot more than happy to get them to their destination before the storm makes flying anywhere at all impossible for the foreseeable future.

After a horrible in-flight accident having nothing to do with the weather downs the plane, Alex and Ben awaken in the freezing cold to discover they've crashed on the side of a mountain, no hints of civilization to be found. At first they make the most of the situation, sheltering in the ruined carcass of the aircraft. But after a few days it becomes apparent help isn't coming. Even though Alex's leg is horribly injured, Ben doing the best he can to patch her up with the materials available at the crash site, the pair set off down the side of the mountain hoping they'll find help.

Based on the best-selling novel by Charles Martin, the romantic survival disaster melodrama The Mountain Between Us features two exceptional actors elevating subpar material to a place where the resultant motion picture could almost be considered worthwhile. Working from a script written by Chris Weitz (Cinderella) and J. Mills Goodloe (The Age of Adaline), acclaimed director Hany Abu-Assad (Paradise Now, Omar) does what he can to authentically ground things in a compellingly visceral realism that might overshadow the more melodramatic elements not-so-subtly hidden inside the story. His crisp handling, coupled with the confidently assured performances of Winslet and Elba, is almost enough to save the day, and if not for a limp, unintentionally hysterical final act there would likely be something surprisingly powerful to talk about here.

But this is not the case. Once Alex and Ben get down off of the mountain and descend into the perilous snow-covered forests below, this tale takes a decidedly syrupy turn that the movie cannot recover from. Things that were subtly developed are suddenly spelled out in bright flashy neon, both characters doing and saying things that have been completely outside of what was established during the story's first two-thirds. It ends up playing like a third-rate Harlequin Romance Novel from the 1980s more than it does anything else, the majority of the goodwill generated by the opening acts lost with a speed that's frustratingly astonishing.

Pity, because for a while there I was fascinated by what Abu-Assad and the screenwriters were choosing to show me, so much of this story filled with richly compelling nuances that held me anxiously spellbound. The opening plane crash is stunning, as are the scenes immediately afterwards with Ben awakening to discover Alex perilously injured, their few supplies strewn about who knows where out in the snow and absolutely no way to call for help. His only sentient companion turns out to be Walter's beloved pet, an excitable dog that doesn't seem to care for him at all, the freezing surgeon constantly giving the animal a grizzled glare almost as if he's wondering what he needs to do to get the canine to warm up to him.

Both Winslet and Elba are wonderful. They slip into the roles with ease, the chemistry oozing off of them hot enough to accelerate global warming to its catastrophic breaking point all by itself. Winslet, in particular, is a model of strength and resilience, yet at the same time still does a superb job of making the paralyzing fear bubbling just underneath her character's surface resonate without it becoming overpowering. I loved just about everything the Oscar-winner was doing here, and even when the film transitions into maudlin, puerile banality there was still something about the actress' work that kept me curious to discover what she was going to do next.

Even so, when air gets let out of this balloon the result comes close to being catastrophic. The movie transitions from being some erstwhile combination of The Edge, The Revenant and Alive (sans cannibalism, of course) to emulating some old Hollywood weepy from the 1940s or '50s. But where films like An Affair to Remember, Old Acquaintance, Brief Encounter, Written on the Wind or Humoresque could be broad and bold with their overripe emotions in large part thanks to the inherent theatricality of their respective stories, in a yarn that's supposed to be as realistic as this one those elements are nothing short of facile. Much like the plane crash that begins this particular tale, The Mountain Between Us bangs into the side of a metaphorical cliff leaving all kinds of wreckage in its wake, the fact any elements worth extolling the virtues of survived at all something of a minor miracle in and of itself.


A cheerful, talent-packed music festival in Las Vegas ends in tragedy
------------------------------
Tales of Armistead Maupin
Maupin to appear in Seattle October 16

------------------------------
Jafar's spell: An interview with Jonathan Weir
------------------------------
Seattle Women's Chorus is FIRED UP for their 15th Anniversary Concert Season
------------------------------
A true heart breaker:
Rock legend Tom Petty dies two months after performing in Seattle

------------------------------
Pink bringing 'Beautiful Trauma World Tour 2018' to Seattle next spring
------------------------------
Chris Botti jazzes up Seattle Symphony's Seattle Pops concert
------------------------------
Is Einstein relatively great or relatively not? You decide.
------------------------------
Captivating Gook a lively L.A. riots drama
------------------------------
Tasveer South Asian Film Festival presents LGBTQ-focused shorts program on October 9
------------------------------
Gay City Arts Season 5: RESISTANCE!
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
THE MUSIC LOUNGE: Morrissey, Ed Sheeran announce new Seattle concerts
------------------------------
Bleakly comic American Made a cruise-powered satire
------------------------------
Intense Super Dark Times a terrifying teenage drama
------------------------------
Ambitious Blade Runner 2049 a stunning sequel
------------------------------
Resurrected Flatliners frustratingly D.O.A.
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2017 - DigitalTeamWorks 2017

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News