Saturday, May 25, 2019
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 43 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, July 7, 2017 - Volume 45 Issue 27
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
Sweltering Beguiled a mystifyingly stunning remake
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE BEGUILED
Now playing


Inquisitive, mushroom-hunting youngster Amy (Oona Laurence) has found a wounded Union soldier hiding in the woods just outside the gates of her Virginia school for girls run by the commanding Miss Martha (Nicole Kidman). After learning his name is Corporal McBurney (Colin Farrell) and introducing herself in the manner a proper Southern lady should, she helps get the quickly deteriorating enemy combatant back to her school before he succumbs to his injuries.

Although leery of having a Union soldier in their midst, Miss Martha and her trusted assistant teacher Miss Edwina (Kirsten Dunst) feel it is their Christian duty to nurse Corporal McBurney back to health before turning him over to the Confederate Army. But, in doing so, they have opened a door to the outside world that affects each woman and girl, no matter what their age, who live on the school's grounds. Amy makes friends. Sexually blossoming Alicia (Elle Fanning) hopes to explore forbidden delights. Headstrong Jane (Angourie Rice) finds her distaste of all things Union starting to fade. As for the rest of this trio's classmates, the perpetually curious Marie (Addison Riecke) and the eerily quiet Emily (Emma Howard), they're also starting to succumb to Corporal McBurney's charms, the wounded soldier quickly determining he's got a good thing going for himself at this school and as such he's determined to make the most of this unique situation.

Based on the novel by Thomas Cullinan and a remake of the Don Siegel directed, Clint Eastwood and Geraldine Page starring 1971 favorite, Sofia Coppola's (Somewhere, Lost in Translation) take on The Beguiled is a decidedly feminist, unnervingly funny foray into Southern Gothic terrors that's as exquisitely made as it is oddly problematic. It's a movie I really, really liked, maybe even loved, exiting the theatre, but also one's whose interior elements began to gnaw at me more and more as I pondered all the different places the hugely talented filmmaker chose to take her version of the story. Featuring mesmerizing performances from Farrell, Kidman, Laurence, Rice and especially Coppola's go-to gal Dunst, hypnotically shot by ace cinematographer Philippe Le Sourd (The Grandmaster), the film nonetheless has me sitting in a weird grey area I'm not altogether comfortable with or even used to, and as such urging people to see it is an iffier proposition than I originally thought it was going to be.

The central conflict remains the same here as it did in Cullinan's book and in Siegel's adaptation: the sexually heightened battle of wills between Corporal McBurney and Miss Martha. She falls for the dashing Union soldier same as everyone else, yet she also just as clearly sees what it is he's trying to do, especially as it pertains to the beautifully wilting flower that is Miss Edwina. McBurney comprehends the ground he stands on as it pertains to the school's headmistress is under constant threat of melting underneath his feet. As such, he does everything he can to ingratiate himself with every adult, teenager and child at the school, hoping to make himself so indispensable that sending him away to a Confederate prison will be the last thing on anyone's mind.

A lot of this stuff is terrific. The scenes between Farrell and Kidman are overflowing in amorous intensity, their back and forth conversations as they spin verbal webs around everything they want to say, almost as if they're speaking in sexually ambiguous code, are as informative as they are sodden in humorous venom. Anytime Laurence and Farrell are on the screen together the film comes alive in childlike wonder, Amy's continually inquisitive ability to see right to the heart of any matter giddily priceless until the point it suddenly becomes uncomfortably paralyzing. There's also something just plain priceless about Rice's transformation, her haughty rigidity slowly but surely disappearing as she begins to understand men, whether they be Union or Confederate, are often cut from the same ill-fitting, if oftentimes still enticing, cloth.

But it is the evolving dynamic that exists between the Corporal and the main object of his manipulations, the emotionally crippled Miss Edwina, that I found most fascinating, and that is almost entirely due to the breadth and depth of Dunst's gripping performance. The pain she feels having been left to wither and potentially shrivel up and die as a spinster teaching a girl's school is palpable from the second she walks onscreen, her mousy timidity starting to wither away bit by bit as the soldier attempts his complex emotional seduction. Dunst explodes with passionate vivacity as things move inevitably towards their ruinously horrific conclusion, the lengths she'll go to achieve her independence tragically giving way to the practical realities of warfare and the feminine independence those around her are suddenly emboldened to achieve.

Yet, as laudable as much of these depictions are, while this female-centered spin on the material is both warranted as well as long overdue, there is a surface-level emotionalism to the story that, the longer I think about it, the more it annoys me. Unlike Siegel's brutally uncompromising film, Coppola doesn't appear to want to dig nearly as deeply inside any of her characters save for Miss Edwina. As such, the delights come from watching each actor work together in symphonic union and not so due to the complexity of the characterizations themselves, making the emotional footprint of the aggressively cynical climax so light it's practically nonexistent.

Then there is the absence of Hallie. Magnificently portrayed by Mae Mercer in Siegel's version, she is the school's lone slave and the only one who maintains her sense of self. She doesn't lose her sanity once the Union soldier begins his seductions and when the rest of the women at the school plot how they are going to deal with him once he starts to threaten their collective safety. More, she is the window to all that is transpiring, the one clean soul who takes no side in the fight and as such becomes a clear, unambiguous symbol of what it was that was at stake during the Civil War. The fact Coppola's adaptation avoids this discussion altogether simply does not make sense, and for the life of me her whitewashing of the story in this manner is more than worthy of far lengthier discussion than what is allowed for in a simple review.

Even so, this take on Cullinan's source material drips in atmosphere, the sweltering Louisiana humidity squeezing the viewer in its sweaty embrace. There is also something remarkable in just how categorically Coppola makes her feminist statements, the bleakly comedic way in which she slowly allows her powerful southern beauties to take control and reconstitute Corporal McBurney into the form they desire, until they crave him no more, dazzling in its gleeful cruelty. I just wish the director had dug a little deeper, that she had not shied away from a number of additional issues outside of the ones relating to sex and gender that she so happily subverts. The Beguiled is well worth seeing but it's also just as worthy of being taken to task for its shortcomings, Coppola's film a mystifying stunner I don't think I'll have a final opinion on until the opportunity arises to watch it again.


Adorable Spider-Man: Homecoming a teenage superhero dream
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING
Now playing


After the irredeemable disaster that was 2014's The Amazing Spider-Man 2, it comes as no surprise that Sony would choose to reboot the comic book character for the third time in 15 years. What potentially could have caught some fans a little off guard was that the Hollywood powerhouse would join forces with Marvel Studios, relinquishing some of their control over the character in order for the Iron Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, Thor and Doctor Strange hit makers to help them craft new adventures for everyone's friendly neighborhood superhero. British actor Tom Holland stepped into the role of Peter Parker/Spider-Man in order to be a part of last year's box office smash Captain America: Civil War, his brief cameo during the film's central superhero melee whetting the public's appetite for his standalone appearance in this year's Spider-Man: Homecoming.

A serious step in the right direction (and a major upgrade over both of the Marc Webb directed The Amazing Spider-Man features), this new high school-set iteration of the character is an agreeable joy for every second of its two-hour running time. In fact, the moment it came to an end I tweeted out that Spider-Man: Homecoming might just be the most adorable motion picture I see all summer, a statement that also just so happens to apply to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) as a whole. This is as giddy an action-filled superhero frolic as anything I could have hoped for, and while I'm not saying the world needed another iteration of the character in such a short period of time, that does not mean I found this Sony-Marvel partnership anything less than a complete and total blast.

Dispensing with the origin story entirely (Uncle Ben is nowhere to be found), director/co-writer Jon Watts (Cop Car) and his cadre of five additional screenwriters pick up the story not too long after the battle at that German airport in Captain America: Civil War. Tasked by Avengers Initiative stalwart Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) to spend more time trying to be an average teenager and not a web-slinging superhero, Peter Parker (Holland) goes back to his daily routine of ogling senior student Liz (Laura Harrier), verbally jousting with classmate Michelle (Zendaya), building Death Stars out of LEGO's with best friend Ned (Jacob Batalon) and trying his best not to let his beloved Aunt May (Marisa Tomei) know anything about his secret crime-fighting alter ego. Spending his free time honing his abilities under the guise of working as an intern for Stark Industries, the eager teenager is starting to get tired of chasing after purse-snatchers and stopping bicycle thieves. Peter wants to catch major criminals doing very bad things. But with Happy Hogan (Jon Favreau) monitoring his every move and his school's Academic Decathlon trip to Washington DC coming up soon, finding the time to take on villains looking to do actual harm to his beloved New York City isn't exactly easy.

Enter Adrian Toomes (Michael Keaton). A blue collar construction worker who was originally tasked by New York to help clean up the wreckage from that massive alien invasion the Avengers put a stop to a few years prior only to have a mysterious bureaucratic piece of the Federal Government steal it out from under him, he's managed to recover from his massive financial losses by selling weapons engineered from the remnants of that intergalactic technology. Peter has caught on to what it is he's been doing, and believing Stark isn't listening to any of his concerns he's taken it upon himself to see Toomes is stopped.

As serious as all that might sound, Watts and his creative team keep the tone of the film bouncy and light, treating this adventure as if it were the second coming of Clueless, The Breakfast Club or Mean Girls, only augmented by the appearance of a web-slinging superhero battling a mechanical vulture in the skies of the Big Apple. They've also gone out of their way to make this the most ethnically diverse entry in the MCU yet, Peter's high school for exceptionally gifted youngsters a wonderful multicultural smorgasbord. The female characters, most notably Liz and Michelle, are especially interesting, all of them respected just as much for their intelligence and chutzpah as they are for their good looks and charisma. It's funny stuff, the byplay between all the kids consistently winning, Holland and the rest of the talented cast making the most of the material at every opportunity.

Yet, there's also no denying just how threadbare and thin the plot proves to be. The screenwriting by committee shows its hand far too often, especially where situations involving Toomes and his henchman trying to steal alien technology is concerned. There's also a lot of coincidental comings and goings, so much so the sheer volume of them makes one hunger for the subtle halcyon days of Paul Haggis's Crash. For those not grasping my sarcasm, that 2004 Oscar-winner is built on a foundation of coincidence, none of the events happening in that story occurring unless each character randomly comes into contact with all the other ones somewhere on the streets of Los Angeles. The same can frequently be said here, so much so the sheer volume of these interactions becomes increasingly silly, in the end diluting the emotional impact of any of the key emotional surprises substantially.

But Toomes still ranks as one of the best, most intriguing and undeniably threatening villains the MCU has ever offered up to this point, his grounded reasons for turning to a life outside of the law packing a decent wallop. Even better is Holland, his performance a rollicking, energetic showcase that's as multifaceted as it is endearing. His realizations as to what it means to be a hero packs a major punch, as do his reactions when he comes to understand Toomes as a man and not some mechanical flying predator looking to do him, his friends or his family harm. The youngster is the real deal, and as outstanding as both Tobey Maguire and Adam Garfield might have been inhabiting the role previously, Holland makes Peter Parker his own with effortless aplomb.

Sam Raimi's Spider-Man 2 is still the best movie ever made involving creators Stan Lee and Steve Ditko's timeless character. Heck, it's flat-out one of the best comic book motion pictures period, so the fact Watts' take doesn't rise to the same glorious heights is hardly shocking. Nonetheless, Spider-Man: Homecoming is a sublime coming out party for the teenage wall-crawler. No matter where Sony or the MCU decide to have him throwing his webs next I can't wait to be the fly on the wall watching it all play out, and here's hoping I have just as much fun getting caught inside its sticky embrace when that inevitably happens as I did here.


Exhilarating Reset a thrilling sci-fi conundrum
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

RESET
Now playing


After her son Doudou (Zhang Yihan) is taken hostage by corporate operative and former military officer Tsui Hu (Wallace Huo), time travel research scientist Xia Tian (Yang Mi) is forced to steal all her research and double-cross her mentor the esteemed Research Director (King Shih-chieh) in order to save the boy's life. But even after accomplishing her task, the frantic mother is betrayed by the sadistic kidnapper. Not only does he detonate a bomb underneath her employer's building, Hu also murders Doudou, believing that by doing so, Tian will have no other chance than to complete her time travel research so she can go back into the past to save him.

But her project is much further along than anyone realizes. Tian escapes Hu's clutches, returns to her crumbling laboratory and, with the aid of her trusted assistant Da Xiong (Liu Chang), uses her working machine to travel back in time and stop these kidnappers from killing her son. But the prototype, while functioning, can only send an individual backward about 100 minutes, not leaving the scientist a ton of time to make things right. Yet Tian will not be stopped, and even if she has to send herself back again and again she's going to make sure that her son survives and this technology isn't perverted into something awful.

I had no idea what to expect when I took a chance watching the Chinese sci-fi mystery Reset. I just found myself captivated by the premise, the ideas driving the plot capturing my attention right away. What I ended up discovering was a witty, fast-paced thriller with a great performance from rising star Mi, the finished film a giddily explosive rollercoaster ride that's so much fun its inherent time travel conundrums frankly don't matter a heck of a lot.

What's great about all of this is that director Chang (The Target) and writer Cha Muchun add a level of grit and gravitas to the proceedings that helps make the pain, anger, sadness and resilience Tian continually puts forth matter in a concrete, impossible to resist fashion that's utterly believable throughout the film. Things get silly. Things sometimes make no sense. Things build into implausible little puzzle boxes that had me scratching my head wondering which way was up every now and then. Yet this woman's emotions, running an unfathomably impossible gamut of extremes the likes of which are beyond easy description, are always believable, come what may, giving the film as a whole a layer of validity that only augments the thrills and chills.

It's anchored by Mi with mesmerizing specificity. At certain points she's portraying three versions of the same character at one time. Yet it's always apparent which Tian is which, and not for a second did I lose track of what each variation of this scientist and mother had experienced or what it was they were going above and beyond to fight for. The actress manages to make each a distinctly different incarnation of the same person, the effects of the time travel coupled nicely with the emotional toll each trek backwards is exacting upon the scientist. By the very nature of the story at hand, Mi is forced to walk an incredibly thin line as she navigates herself through all this zany unhinged science fiction madness, the fact she does so with such confident authority just extraordinary.

Things do get bogged down in some rather typical time travel scruffiness, and there are certainly points where Muchun's script can loop itself into some rather wacky corners it doesn't always know the best way to get out of. A third act surprise reveal is also a moderate letdown, while a backstory explaining why Hu is so willing to go to such abhorrently awful lengths to see his job completed isn't delivered with quite the punch I felt like it warranted. There's also some lumpy storytelling dynamics regarding the introductory stuff explaining the time travel process as well as the animosity between the two competing corporations, and it isn't until Doudou is kidnapped and Tian is forced into action that the movie begins to hit its stride.

But Chang's direction is forceful and direct, his ability to keep things moving at a fevered, ever-escalating pace certainly not something to be undervalued. He also stages the film's convoluted, pulse-pounding climax with energy to burn, tension ramping up into overdrive as threat after threat is dealt with by one of the various Tians only for another to make its mangy self known from the most unanticipated of corridors. Chang also keeps things surprisingly grounded, never playing any of the plot mechanics for observantly anachronistic laughs, the film bracing its inherent absurdity even though it never winks back at the audience as if it knows just how silly all this is. Reset works, there's really nothing else to say, this ticking clock thriller a timely leap into the human abyss that proves once again a parent's love for their child is as undying as it is also potentially unstoppable.


Latest Despicable Me running short of new ideas
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

DESPICABLE ME
Now playing


Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) has settled into his non-villainous life as a Secret Agent alongside wife Lucy (Kristen Wiig), and while the Minions aren't exactly pleased he's no longer a bad guy, adoptive daughters Margo (Miranda Cosgrove), Edith (Dana Gaier) and Agnes (Nev Scharrel) couldn't be prouder of him. But after an attempt to capture former '80s child star turned villain Balthazar 'Evil' Bratt (Trey Parker) goes awry, Gru and Lucy suddenly find themselves unceremoniously fired by their new boss Valerie Da Vinci (Jenny Slate), forced to take the blame even though they went above and beyond in their attempts to capture the notoriously elusive criminal.

Just as things appear to be at their worst, news of the most amazing kind comes the family's way from the small pig-loving country of Freedonia. Turns out, Gru has a twin named Dru (also Carell), their parents deciding to take custody of the children separately after they divorced. Before anyone can say 'parent trap,' the two brothers are reunited, Lucy, Margo, Edith and Agnes all in awe of the blond newcomer's spacious Freedonian estate. But Dru has a secret of his own; he longs to follow in the villainous footsteps of their father, prints once upon a time Gru used to fill perfectly. Unbeknownst to Lucy, the two brothers start to formulate a plan, one that, when enacted, will show Evil Bratt who the best bad guys are. Heck, they might even just save the world, or at least the city of Los Angeles, in the process.

As convoluted as Despicable Me 3 might initially appear to be, it's clear that the creators of this internationally popular set of animated films are starting to run short of fresh ideas. The whole last third feels like it's cribbed, almost beat-for-beat, from the finale of 2015's Minions, while other sections repeat ideas from the other two entries in the series close to verbatim. Not that the third time isn't without its charm. There's a lovely side plot involving Agnes' search for an honest to goodness unicorn deep in a Freedonian forest that's paid off perfectly, while another running gag revolving around Lucy's attempts to become an actual mother to the three girls is handled with delicate precision. The movie, unlike that rancid aforementioned spin-off, also employs the Minions as they should be utilized, their few moments of comic relief maybe the movie's most amusing elements.

A handful of clever Duck Soup allusions and a smattering of solid visual sight gags aside (most of those unsurprisingly involving the Minions), I still can't say there's a ton additional I found exciting. Bratt isn't near the villain he likely should be, the '80s gags too tired and obvious to be as amusing as directors Pierre Coffin and Kyle Balda, along with co-director Eric Guillon, likely intend them to be. The filmmakers also waste Slate in a thankless role, while they once again underutilize a returning Julie Andrews as Gru's snarky mother to the point I hope she got paid a significant sum for all of two or three minutes of embarrassing screen time she ends up filling.

Then there is the level of violence. As with Minions (and also last year's non-Despicable Me animated hit The Secret Life of Pets, also from the studio behind this franchise), the amount of destruction and carnage going on inside this thing just feels out of place for a story that at its core is so simplistic and sweet. The carnage stands out in a way that doesn't fit neatly alongside the cute, childlike elements that often drive the characters forward as they pursue their various goals. Bratt's plan calls for the absolute destruction of Hollywood so buildings crumble in a mass of explosive fireballs, and even if it's all covered in gigantic pink blobs of bubblegum, the full extent of the devastation still left a bad taste in my mouth that soured my enjoyment of the film a substantial amount.

Yet, it's hard for me to come down too hard on any of this. I did laugh, and the best bits had me grinning ear-to-ear. I also love that the filmmakers are going out of their way to try and show Gru has started to come into his own as a loving father, the way he listens to his girls and tries to explain things to them in ways they'll understand just plain precious. Even so, Despicable Me 3 is easily the least interesting film in the trilogy, the fact all involved are having such difficulty coming up with many original ideas speaking volumes. Gru and his Minions aren't bad, at least not yet, but they're certainly getting close to being drawn that way, and as such it's likely time the animators got the opportunity to utilize their many talents on something else other than this ongoing series.


Raucous Band Aid a thunderous concert of reflective regret
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

BAND AID
Now playing


Anna (Zoe Lister-Jones) and Ben's (Adam Pally) marriage has seen better days. They're constantly at one another's throats, their arguments achieving a level of vitriol and animosity it's a wonder the two haven't decided to call it quits, called lawyers and started divorce proceedings. But there's a tragic anger driving their enmity that compels them to try and find a way to work things out, and if Anna and Ben could only channel those complex feelings in some sort of creatively positive way, maybe their marriage could be saved.

Inspiration strikes. Anna wonders, what would happen if the two of them set their arguments to music? What if they started a band with the goal of playing an open mic night at a local club in order to get these feelings out of their system, tossing them back into the world as musical fodder for listeners to sing along with? What would that be like? It's an odd idea, make no mistake, but one both Anna and Ben feel oddly compelled to try, even enlisting their peculiar, awkwardly nosey neighbor Dave (Fred Armisen) to play the drums in their infant rock band.

The directorial debut of writer and actress Zoe Lister-Jones (Lola Versus, Consumed), I don't think I could adore Band Aid more if I tried. A magical, intimately compelling story pulsating with invigorating music and refreshing emotional insights, this is a smart, delicately lissome little drama that left me flabbergasted by just how much it left me aching in multifaceted rapture by the time things came to a conclusion. A beautiful meditation on romance, marriage and family, this captivating gem is one of the year's most joyfully electric and cathartically alive achievements, and for Lister-Jones it shows a level of narrative maturation that caught me by surprise.

It's the level of forthright honesty that floored me the most. Much like Richard Linklater's Before Sunset, John Carney's Once or David Lean's Brief Encounter, as eccentric or as coincidental as some elements might initially appear, the emotional elements propelling the characters forward are continually nothing short of genuine. No matter how silly things might initially appear, the events surrounding Anna and Ben are never belittled, never marginalized, their anger and grief only equaled by their continued affection for one another as well as an absolute desire to see if they can fix things before divorce becomes the only other viable option available.

Lister-Jones doesn't browbeat the audience like she did with her script for Lola Versus. There's an understated subtlety to this story that allows for a grounded take on the material, one that reminded me more of something like John Cassavetes eviscerating 1968 classic Faces than it did virtually anything else. It's lighter on its feet than that potboiler, and it's certainly much less violently vitriolic, but the ebb and flow of the interpersonal dramatic pieces showcase an eerily similar élan that hit me hard. Anna and Ben's fights are bruising; they take no prisoners. But when they're put into song they allow for a form of cathartic release that's startlingly universal, striking a potent chord I found I was still mulling over long after the film itself had reached its conclusion.

I don't want to say too much. While not a lot about what happens here surprises or falls too far outside of standard plot conventions, the European-like focus on the characters and their relationships, as well as the stripped-down filmmaking stylistics reminiscent of Hollywood dramas (both indie and studio financed) of the late 1960s, early 1970s cannot be undervalued. Lister-Jones' hushed approach challenges the viewer, forces us to sit inside Anna and Ben's clothes in a manner that isn't always comforting. But having us walk the same mile they do in shoes they themselves are wearing is a therapeutically evocative means to an exceedingly profound end, Band Aid hitting so many right notes any false ones it might inadvertently strike are lost in a symphony of reflective magnificence I could listen to for days on end with no hesitation whatsoever.


Robert Petkoff: The stage is a real Fun Home
------------------------------
MoPOP's new Bowie exhibit showcases rare moments of the music icon
------------------------------
Feeling moved

Zoe Lister-Jones makes a rockin' directorial splash with Band Aid

------------------------------
Donald Byrd, could you do (IM)PULSE again, please?
------------------------------
They've got rhythm, they've got music at OSF
------------------------------
Songs of the City! with Victor Janusz and friends
------------------------------
ArtsWest Playhouse and Gallery announces

AFTER HOURS WITH MATHEW WRIGHT: SUMMER OF SONDHEIM

Featuring Eric Ankrim Jessica Skerritt and Justin Huertas

------------------------------
McKinnon, Wood, RuPaul, Harris, 'The Handmaid's Tale' and Oprah all contenders for Primetime Emmys
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
Letters
------------------------------
Queen + Adam Lambert are the champions of a spectacular concert at Key Arena
------------------------------
Sweltering Beguiled a mystifyingly stunning remake
------------------------------
Adorable Spider-Man: Homecoming a teenage superhero dream
------------------------------
Exhilarating Reset a thrilling sci-fi conundrum
------------------------------
Latest Despicable Me running short of new ideas
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2017 - DigitalTeamWorks 2017

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News