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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, April 28, 2017 - Volume 45 Issue 17
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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Emotionally refined Their Finest a rousing triumph
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THEIR FINEST
Now playing


It is 1940, and Catrin Cole (Gemma Arterton) has been handed a remarkable opportunity. With a war raging and German bombs dropping on London almost every night, the plucky advertising copywriter is asked by the British War Department to help boost morale by writing dialogue for female characters in government produced short films designed to help the war effort. Nicknamed 'slop' by the male writers working on the same material, Catrin proves to be very good at this job, so much so screenwriter Tom Buckley (Sam Claflin) sends her out to the coast to interview a pair of sisters who, according to reports, courageously assisted in the massive evacuation of Allied soldiers from the beaches of Dunkirk.

While the story doesn't check out exactly as described, that doesn't mean there still isn't something there. Catrin sells the sisters' story as a potential feature, and the War Department eats it up. She is immediately tasked to assist Tom in the writing of a script, one with strong female heroines and a mixture of comedy, drama, romance and action to keep viewers in Britain and America entertained. But it also needs to get them excited to be a part of the war effort and, in the case of the United States, hopefully convince them entering the fight against Nazi Germany is of the utmost imperative. Catrin gives herself over completely to the project, and even in the face of unimaginable personal hardship and war-ravaged tragedy she learns the most important thing about show business: no matter what the cost, the show must go on.

Based on the 2009 book Their Finest Hour and a Half by Lissa Evans, with a script by BBC television veteran Gaby Chiappe ('Vera,' 'The Level') and directed by award-winning filmmaker Lone Scherfig (An Education, Italian for Beginners), the World War II British home front drama Their Finest is incredibly entertaining. It is funny, charming, romantic and surprisingly emotional, the movie an honest examination of what it must have been like to be living in Britain during the war. Chiappe's script, while never shattering convention, also doesn't mince words or try to sugarcoat the situation, and while certain elements do stumble into melodramatic convenience, overall this is a bracing, deeply affecting effort all involved should be proud of.

For Scherfig, the film is a noticeable return to form for the Danish director after she stumbled with 2011's dreadful One Day and had trouble maintaining a consistent tone with the nicely acted if dramatically inert 2014 drama The Riot Club. This is a smooth, confident film, one that transitions through its various narrative strands with ease. Scherfig never loses her focus and as such the central focus remains on Catrin and her personal journey no matter what else might be going on within the story at the same time. It's an impressive balancing act, the director managing to even soften the more cliché elements when they sneak their way in, making even the most coincidental twists of fate appear more authentic than they potentially could have been.

I do love how much is going on here. There are a number of intriguing subplots, not the least of which is one involving sixty-something actor Ambrose Hilliard (beautifully underplayed by Bill Nighy) who must come to grips with the fact he's no longer an above-the-title star and is instead the veteran character guy called in to play the loveable drunken uncle who gets killed off before the third act. This is a delightful little arc, one that is surprisingly poignant, Hilliard's path to being in Catrin and Tom's film a pleasantly moving one. A number of little asides involving him, most notably one concerning his agent and best friend Sammy Smith (Eddie Marsan) and his driven, intelligently outspoken wife Sophie (Helen McCrory), are magnificent, while a final dialogue between the actor and one of his writers in the wake of senseless tragedy had me choking back a handful of tears.

Arterton is excellent, her chemistry with Claflin absolute perfection, the two actors disappearing into their respective roles. While the ins and outs of their relationship almost never surprise, that doesn't make the blossoming of their friendship and emotional intimacy feel any less sublime. Arterton soars, delivering her best performance since Neil Jordan's mesmerizing 2012 supernatural stunner Byzantium, Chiappe's screenplay requiring the actress to jump through a number of varied emotive hoops as things progress. It's a difficult balancing act, one she pulls off with mesmerizing grace, all of which allows for Catrin's transformation to have real resonance, especially as things move towards their difficultly tragic conclusion.

What's notable is that, even if everything doesn't work out as perfectly or as nicely as the viewer hopes it will, the film never forgetting for a second that this is a world at war and happy endings aren't always possible, the empowering euphoria of where things end up cannot be denied. Scherfig allows the unspoken to speak volumes, the reaction of a pair of random moviegoers showcasing the vitality of the cinematic image in a fashion that is pure, distinct and imperative. Catrin finds herself, discovers who she is, and in this discovery tells us something about ourselves, our dreams and what we can accomplish in this world as long as we have the courage and the fortitude to put ourselves out there to potentially fail.


Imaginatively vulgar Free Fire a shotgun blast of kinetic insanity
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

FREE FIRE
Now playing


Justine (Brie Larson) has brought high-ranking I.R.A. members Chris (Cillian Murphy) and Frank (Michael Smiley) to a closed down factory in the middle of Boston nowhere in order to help facilitate a gun deal between them and nutty South African dealer Vernon (Sharlto Copley) and his quietly stoic partner Martin (Babou Ceesay). Standing between them all keeping the peace is the charming Ord (Armie Hammer), the friendly enforcer tasked with maintaining civility while also ensuring the deal runs smoothly and both sides walk away satisfied.

This proves impossible, however, after it is revealed that two men from each side of the deal, Chris' driver (and Frank's nephew) Stevo (Sam Riley) and Vernon's henchman Harry (Jack Reynor), coincidentally meeting the night before, the bad blood brewing between them ready to boil over if no one is careful. But as potentially lethal as that might be, no one could have predicted either of them would be stupid enough to start something while transaction involving automatic weapons was going down. Yet that's exactly the case, and soon everyone is hitting the dirt, diving for protection and pulling out their own guns in order to survive until the morning.

Bullets indeed fly in director Ben Wheatley's (High-Rise, Sightseers) latest genre-bending free-for-all Free Fire, this raucous bit of surreal comedic mayhem and carnage a shotgun blast of violent insanity that's an enjoyable hoot for every one of its rambunctious 90 minutes. Working once again with frequent co-writer and collaborator (and wife) Amy Jump, the filmmaker unleashes what has to be his most entertaining bit of madness yet. While this effort doesn't reach the brilliant heights of the pair's masterfully terrifying 2011 stunner Kill List, in its own unique way it's nearly as satisfying, the balletic joy of watching events play themselves out to conclusion frankly wonderful.

Not that there's a lot happening. The movie is all about a gun deal gone hopelessly wrong, the crux of the film's running time consumed with how everyone attempts to navigate their way through this escalating madness as they crawl around the factory floor on their knees, hide behind cement blocks and lob verbal grenades back and forth. What makes it work is that Wheatley and Jump go out of their way to craft interesting characters, all of whom are completely different and thus stand out in their own uniquely interesting way. Better, they allow room for their actors to craft role as they see best, even those with the shortest screen time allowed the freedom to make the most of each line of dialogue or bit of physical action thrown their way.

Seriously, everyone here is terrific. Riley, Reynor, Ceesay, Smiley, Noah Taylor and Patrick Bergin all have signature moments that brought a smile to my face, while Murphy and Copley prove to be sensational livewires who appear to be relishing every single second they're allowed to prance and preen their way around Wheatley's bullet-riddled playground. Larson doesn't just hold her own as the film's solitary female protagonist, she oftentimes dominates with a mixture of assertive resilience and bewildered incomprehension as to how things could have devolved into carnivorous madness with such gruesome rapidity. As for Hammer, much like he did in The Man from U.N.C.L.E., the actor showcases a beguiling comedic virtuosity that's as charming as it is sexy, his cocksure preening a joyous bit of narcissistic machismo that's giddily spellbinding.

Wheatley conducts with confidence, the filmmaker doing a fine job of making sure the viewer has a solid idea of the factory's architectural layout, that way when things fall apart the audience has a good concept of where people can go to hide and how far they need to crawl in order to even attempt to make it back to the front door alive. The action fireworks, as explosive as they might be, are nothing compared to the ingeniously vulgar bits of repartee he and Jump have crafted for the ensemble to sink their collective teeth into. It's as if the two are channeling Quentin Tarantino, Charles Lederer and Armando Iannucci as far as the dialogue is concerned, the rapid-fire nature of the four-letter based pitter-patter an abhorrently amusing delight.

It's all pretty thin, everything playing out pretty much in real time with survival quickly becoming the objective, all other priorities falling to the wayside almost immediately. But that doesn't make the movie any less enjoyable, the violent insanity of it all a kinetic fireball of mayhem and activity that's a jovial, witty surprise that refuses to pull its punches and enjoys playing for keeps no matter what the cost. More importantly, Wheatley builds things to what might just be the most satisfying final moment I've had the pleasure to witness so far this year, Free Fire a crackerjack maelstrom of creative madness that's a full-throttle merry-go-round of machine-gun excitement.


Lushly enigmatic Lost City worthy of discovery
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE LOST CITY OF Z
Now playing


In 1906, professional British soldier Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam) is tasked by the Royal Geographical Society to lead an expedition into uncharted regions of the Amazon to map the Bolivian border and to trace the Rio Verde River to its source. While his loving wife Nina (Sienna Miller) worries about what the years required to accomplish this task will mean to their growing family, both agree that coming home triumphant in this endeavor will change their fortunes substantially, and as opportunities go this could easily turn out to be a major one.

Returning two years later alongside his now trusted aide-de-camp and friend Henry Costin (Robert Pattinson), Fawcett is a national hero, traveling to a far corner of the globe many considered impassible. A tough, tiring journey filled with dangers, this experience has changed this explorer's life forever, his discovery of broken shards of ancient pottery and magnificently detailed carvings where neither should have existed leading him to believe a lost civilization exists someplace in the heart of the still uncharted Amazon jungle. Labeling this mythical city 'Zed,' while many at the Royal Geographical Society scoff at his assertions, Fawcett is determined to return to this South American wilderness in order to prove his theory, and he's hopeful Costin will choose to join him in this endeavor.

Based on the nonfiction best seller by author David Grann, with the eerie, illusory, metaphorical stunner The Lost City of Z writer/director James Gray (The Yards) has finally composed a motion picture worthy of masterpiece consideration. Beautifully raw, adventurously esoteric, this is a richly cinematic accomplishment that deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as undisputed classics like Werner Herzog's Aguirre, the Wrath of God, Terrence Malick's The Thin Red Line, David Lean's Lawrence of Arabia and Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now. It is a movie that floats through the psyche like it is the wispy beginnings of a dream on the verge of formation, ego and courage, faith and family, reason and insanity all melding into one harmonious, tragically euphoric operetta by the time things reach their stunningly ephemeral conclusion.

Covering nearly a quarter century of history, culminating in an unsolved mystery that will likely never be resolved, Gray's latest is a character-driven sensation, made with confidence and care as it travels along the never-ending rivers of human perseverance where good judgment and common sense can oftentimes give way to flights of fancy born of braggadocio, chutzpah, courage and intelligence. Fawcett's journey is a real life Heart of Darkness foray into the unknown, the explorer's first journey into the Amazon coming only seven years after Joseph Conrad's classic epic first saw publication. It's this sort of through line that Gray follows to its logical, likely its only, conclusion, the elegiac yet hopeful tone of the final scenes heartbreaking in their triumphant, impenetrably tragic ambiguity.

Hunnam, a fine actor mostly known for his long stint headlining 'Sons of Anarchy' and yet also one who has also never quite delivered on the potential hinted at early in his career in films as diverse as Nicholas Nickleby, Green Street Hooligans and Children of Men, delivers his best performance yet as Fawcett. His upright fortitude is a mask for a resilience and a drive born of frustration and despair resulting from a family name that's not exactly held in high regard by those in positions of power. As such, he undertakes his hazardous initial Amazonian mission not because he wants to, but because he believes it to be the only way to redeem himself for sins committed in the line of duty by his father decades prior, Hunnam expertly conveying a number of varied emotions as he ponders accepting the challenge put before him by the Royal Geographical Society.

But it's in the discovery where the performance soars. Not just as Fawcett's eyes are opened to spectacular sights and sounds amidst the wilds of the jungle, but also at home, in the way he looks at his wife Nina after years apart or when he embraces his children, awed by their growth and maturation during the time he's been away. Hunnam is masterful in these moments, the regret he oozes over not being there with his family for such long stretches is achingly coupled with a longing to return to the overgrown wilderness in order to pursue his dreams of finding Zed. It is the type of complex, multifaceted performance entire careers can be built upon, the simple, authentically realized dexterity of the actor's accomplishments extraordinary.

The rest of the supporting cast, including Miller, the actress finally given a role equal to her talents for the first time in what feels like ages, is equally wonderful. Pattinson is a hoot, his almost silent portrait of the resiliently faithful Costin a shaggy-eared bit of eccentric whimsy that's as multilayered as it is naturalistic. Upcoming Spider-Man: Homecoming star Tom Holland makes a third act impression as Fawcett's eldest son Jack who's ready to follow in his father's exploratory footsteps, while veteran character actors Ian McDiarmid and Angus Macfadyen are memorably fascinating as members of the Royal Geographical Society who both play a vital role in shaping this story's continually surprising twists and turns. Best of all might be unknown Pedro Coello as Fawcett's initial guide, Tadjui, his insights into what heading down the Rio Verde for the first time will eventually mean for the British explorer earth-shattering in their prescient clarity.

It could be claimed the fashion in which Gray has shaped his narrative might be too vague, and there are certainly moments where the transient observational nature of the film is fairly perplexing. But Fawcett's story has no answer, no resolution, only the faintest outlines of an idea as to where he went, what happened to him and why it did, and as such the filmmaker remains true to that outcome no matter what the consequences for the audience might be. It's an audacious bit of storytelling verisimilitude, Oscar-nominee Darius Khondji's (Midnight in Paris) spellbinding camerawork and Christopher Spelman's (The Immigrant) remarkable score adding just the right touch to hammer home all of the metaphorical madness the director is hinting at. The Lost City of Z is a rapturous achievement worthy of discovery, its enigmatic brilliance of a sublime majesty unique in and of itself.


Disneynature's Born in China a kid-friendly documentary
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

BORN IN CHINA
Now playing

Born in China is Disneynature's latest continuation of the Disney brand of True Life Adventures that follows quite easily in the footsteps of a number of the many Earth Day releases that have preceded it, including Monkey Kingdom, Bears, African Cats and Chimpanzee. In this iteration, director Lu Chuan (City of Life and Death) doesn't do anything to break out of the mold established by all the previous features (save Oceans, that Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud helmed stunner still the reigning Disneynature champion), keeping things as childlike as possible as he tells the three varying stories at the heart of this particular tale.

Narrated by John Krasinski in the same sort of unforced, kid-friendly style many of those like Tim Allen (Chimpanzee) or Tina Fey (Monkey Kingdom) have utilized before him, here we meet a panda and her baby in the Wolong National Nature Reserve in the Sichuan Province, a family of golden snub-nosed monkeys in the Hubei Shennongjia National Nature Reserve near the Yangtze River, four-legged chiru in the Kekexili National Nature Reserve making their annual trek into isolation to give birth to their calves and the red-crowned cranes as they soar between the Heilongjiang Zhalong National Nature Reserve and the Jiangsu Yancheng National Nature Reserve. Most impressive of all, 5,000 meters above sea level in the Qinghai province on the northeast rim of the Tibetan plateau, the film introduces the audience to the seldom seen snow leopard, a mother and her two cubs attempting to survive their year in one of the most perilous and barren places on the face of the Earth.

Starting in Autumn, moving forward from there into Winter, Spring and Summer, Chuan and his team chronicle each animal in their habitat as parents care for their various young under a wide variety of environmental conditions. We see our baby panda learn to climb trees, a two-year-old golden snub-nosed monkey decide whether he'll remain part of a pack or attempt to make it in the jungle alone and female chiru circle together as a thunderous herd as a way to protect their young from predators. Most importantly, we keep tabs on our mother snow leopard as she attempts the impossible to get food for her hungry children, putting herself in extreme danger in order to hopefully ensure their survival.

It's all beautifully photographed and shot, and Chuan transitions between his various stories rather seamlessly, veteran nature documentary editor Matthew Meech ('Planet Earth II') doing a fine job navigating through the footage in order to pull out an assortment of essential moments worthy of a look. But, other than the fate of that snow leopard and her cubs, there's not a lot in the way of drama to anything that transpires, and as beautiful as it all is it isn't like the filmmakers are attempting to dig all that deep. I can't exactly say that I learned a heck of a lot about these creatures other than that their various survival skills are all suitably impressive, and while Disney once again saddles all their primary characters with a bunch of cutesy names like Ya Ya, Mei Mei, Tao Tao and Dawa, the studio's fear of showcasing anything that could be challenging or difficult is fairly obvious.

This is actually an important point because, for the first time that I can recall, a main story arc in one of these Disneynature offerings does not have anything close to a traditional happy ending. And yet, when things go bad for this animal, when danger rears its ugly head and refuses to go quietly into the goodnight, it's almost as if Chuan or the producers have no idea how to talk about or showcase these moments. While I applaud the fact the film does not sugarcoat what happens, its refusal to put what transpires into context, to just leave things be with no comment whatsoever, it frankly just feels wrong, and I can only imagine the flood of questions parents are going to be asked about it by their pint-sized companions after they exit the theatre.

Still, I do love the fact that Disney keeps bringing these documentaries to the screen each April, and the fact they've designed them so clearly to appeal to children, and to get them excited about learning more about the natural world is certainly commendable. On that level, Born in China fits into the Disneynature canon nicely, and while I personally wasn't blown away by the film, that doesn't mean I still don't hope parents take their little ones out to see it. This is a perfectly nice nature documentary that deserves its theatrical showcase, and that's really all there is to say.


Sexually adventurous Mouth dramatically underwhelming
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

BELOW HER MOUTH
Now playing


Below Her Mouth is one of those films I'd almost rather not review if I could get away with it. Much like she hinted at with her 2015 revenge-thriller 88, actor-turned-director April Mullen continues to showcase real promise behind the camera, her sense of style, pacing and narrative urgency impressive. The movie also thrusts into the spotlight an almost all-female crew as far as the major behind-the-scenes technicians are concerned, Maya Bankovic's impressively sweat-drenched cinematography, Michelle Szemberg's kinetically enthralling editing and Faye Mullen's authentically expressive production design all worthy of mention. Then there are the powerhouse performances from the two primary stars, familiar character actor Natalie Krill and Swedish supermodel Erika Linder anchoring things with a graceful urgency that's naturalistic and pure.

So what's the problem? I just don't think the movie works. Not as a romance. Not as a drama. While Stephanie Fabrizi's script means well, in some ways feeling like a lesbian reworking of Louis Malle's 1992 erotic classic Damage, as both pictures deal with the nature of instant romantic and sexual longing between strangers, most of what transpires is far too contrived and facile to ever pass as authentic. These aren't characters, they're archetypes going through the motions of passing as three-dimensional human beings, thus caring about what is happening to any of them at any given moment proves to be frustratingly impossible.

It's a fairly standard setup. Fashion editor Jasmine (Krill), engaged to marry the handsome Rile (Sebastian Pigott), finds herself strangely drawn to the mysterious Dallas (Erika Linder), a roofer working on the house next door to her own. After an encounter at a predominately lesbian nightclub, the two women give into their mutual attraction, entering into a torrid affair that could easily spiral out of control. Torn between this powerful, confidently sexual woman who has suddenly entered into her life and the quiet, reservedly masculine everyman she was planning to spend the rest of her life with, Jasmine isn't sure what to do, things for her playing out in a manner that's as confusing as it is complicated.

Much like it sadly was for many as it pertained to 2013's Blue is the Warmest Color, the major selling point as far as this film is concerned is going to be the high volume of explicit sex scenes, some of which might not be simulated. Unlike that Cannes Film Festival prizewinner, however, there is no complexity to the overarching scenario in this film, the characters themselves thinly conceived caricatures who aren't particularly easy to relate to. More, the third act shenanigans involving Rile do not work, the man's actions being what they are more to add heated conflict to a story solely for the sake of putting it there, this hint of violent reprisal never coming from a place of value or authenticity.

What's annoying is that Mullen's delicate handling of things is impressive, the early passages where she visually develops the growing attraction between Jasmine and Dallas dripping in passionate longing. Her framing of certain sequences reminding me of the couplings in Lilly and Lana Wachowski's Bound and Patricia Rozema's When Night Is Falling, yet they also held their own distinctively idiosyncratic intensity I found undeniably captivating. But she shows no ability to soften or make worthwhile any of the more melodramatic and ponderous plot elements, and while things continually look terrific the emotional components barely have any pulse whatsoever.

Don't blame either Krill or Linder. Both actresses give themselves over completely to the material, doing all that is asked of them and more. The former has a winsome gracefulness that's enchanting, while the latter oozes carnivorous sensuality that's undeniably palpable. The two of them together are a dynamic pair, and it's easy to become enthralled by them, each woman doing what she can to make her respective character come alive in ways the script itself barely hints at.

I wish I felt differently about Below Her Mouth. It pains me to extol so many of its virtues yet in the same breath state I don't think it's all that worthwhile as cinematic entertainment. The filmmakers are attempting something great here, and I applaud the efforts of Mullen and her talented crew on a number of levels. But I just didn't care what happened to either Jasmine or Dallas, wasn't interested in seeing whether or not their passionate affair was going to lead someplace other than tragic regret, wasn't curious to know if they'd end up together. This movie, for all its merits, did not work for me, and other than being a pretty, sexually adventurous calling card for the director, her creative team and the actresses at the center of the drama, I'm not sure there's a lot more to talk about.


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May 2017 theater openings
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MAY is Trans Art Month
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Letters
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Bumbershoot lineup includes Lorde, Weezer, Solange and Margaret Cho
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Emotionally refined Their Finest a rousing triumph
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Imaginatively vulgar Free Fire a shotgun blast of kinetic insanity
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Lushly enigmatic Lost City worthy of discovery
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Disneynature's Born in China a kid-friendly documentary
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