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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, April 14, 2017 - Volume 45 Issue 15
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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Action-heavy Fate furiously silly
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS
Now playing


It's hard to know where to start when it comes to talking about a new entry in the Fast and the Furious franchise. Now on their eighth episode, The Fate of the Furious once again builds on the changes the series introduced in 2009's Fast & Furious, audaciously expanded upon in 2011's Fast Five, perfected in 2013's Fast & Furious 6 and sent into animated cartoonish whirlybird enjoyably ludicrous crazy land with the release of 2015's Furious 7. It shows how the minds behind this rebirth, namely screenwriter Chris Morgan (who's been around since 2006's The Fast and Furious: Tokyo Drift and written every sequel since) and producer/star Vin Diesel, have struck upon a template that has brought them monstrous international box office success and moderately surprising critical acclaim. In short, this eighth adventure fits squarely in the if it ain't broke don't fix it model of Hollywood filmmaking, and I have trouble believing everyone involved won't be pleased by the overall reaction coming from those who purchase a ticket.

That does not mean that things aren't starting to grow a little stale. The twists aren't as surprising as they once were, while the constant speechifying as it pertains to 'family' and 'teamwork' is becoming its own running gag suitable for a sorority house drinking game. The unabashed, over-exuberant machismo is getting stale, and even though all the primary women in this franchise continue to be able to hold their own against all adversaries, no one will ever confuse this series with pictures like Mad Max: Fury Road, Haywire or even an old school chestnut like The Long Kiss Goodnight anytime soon. One wonders if they aren't even trying to make a cohesive movie at this point, just a lot of extended bits with characters jubilantly yapping at one another, everything revolving around an escalating series of car-related action set pieces that get wilder, longer and more ambitious seemingly with every sequel.

This time, former bad boy and vehicular road warrior turned Robin Hood do-gooder, international terrorist hunter and clandestine American hero Dominic Torreto (Diesel), while vacationing with his new wife Letty (Michelle Rodriguez) in Cuba, is contacted by a cold-blooded cyber criminal known only as Cipher (Charlize Theron). For reasons too personal and secretive to share with anyone, she forces him to go back to his criminal roots and betray his close-knit crew, all of whom he considers family. Not only does this mean Dom is turning his back on Letty, he's also once again made an enemy out of DSS Agent Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson), a fact made even worse because this clandestine double-cross happened on foreign soil, thus meaning the U.S. government had to disavow their ace operative in order to maintain diplomatic relations with Germany.

Aided by the still secretive Mr. Nobody (Kurt Russell), Hobbs makes it a priority to get back his good name by nailing his former friend for the crime. To do it, not only must he utilize the core members of Dom's team, namely Letty, Tej (Chris 'Ludacris' Bridges), Roman (Tyrese Gibson) and Ramsey (Nathalie Emmanuel), but he'll also be forced to enlist the services of former British S.A.S. operative turned bad guy Deckard (Jason Statham), the crack killer willing to put his anger towards the group on hold if it means he's going to get a shot at Cipher. She was responsible for transforming his younger brother Owen (Luke Evans) into a crook, so for him going after her is decidedly personal. As for Dom, he's got a few cards of his own still to play, and by the time he lays down his hand he can only hope everyone will understand his reasons for going rogue and making enemies of those he loves.

For a film as elaborate as this one, there are virtually no surprises, and even when Helen Mirren pops up in a key supporting role it takes about half-a-second for the audience to figure out who she is as well as her connection to the larger story. Morgan's script is flimsy, the device utilized to bring Dom's dark side to the forefront as melodramatically silly as anything this series has ever offered up for evaluation, and that includes Letty's resurrection and bout with amnesia just two films back. It's another opportunity for a departed character to be suddenly resurrected if only to be later discarded in brutal fashion, erasing a still existing love triangle in way that both solves a narrative problem created by the earlier sequels yet also feels needlessly heartless at the same time.

Even so, these characters remain a ton of fun to see in action, especially Hobbs and Deckard, the movie worth the price of a matinee ticket just to watch Johnson and Statham play whimsically belligerent verbal whack-a-mole with one another as they lob insults back and forth with virtuoso impropriety. As for Theron, she manically gobbles up the screen, gleefully gorging on Morgan's insanely dippy dialogue as if it were a gourmet meal served up to her by a Michelin Star chef. While I might personally prefer her wicked turns as the Evil Queen in Snow White and the Huntsman and The Huntsman: Winter's War, the Oscar-winning actress still revels in Cipher's madness, the sheer joy she finds in portraying these types of villains proving to be nothing short of glorious.

Director F. Gary Gray, fresh off his success handling the N.W.A. biopic Straight Outta Compton, returns to his action roots, and there are moments where it feels like the filmmaker is having a heck of a time delivering a handful of inspired set pieces. Primarily two of them, one involving Hobbs and Deckard escaping from a maximum security prison during a riot, the other on the streets of New York where every vehicle fit with modern self-drive technology becomes a battering ram utilized to move a mark into a position where Dom can steal a suitcase filled with Russian military secrets. Both are extraordinary, eye-popping in their attention to detail and overflowing in bracing, freewheeling excitement. Gray orchestrates the action with a maestro's touch, each of these sequences so terrific I almost forgot just how dumb and comically overblown all of this brazenly is.

It all runs out of steam. The actual climax, a superb fight sequence aboard a plane involving a baby reminiscent of John Woo's Hard-Boiled notwithstanding, isn't nearly as awesome. Truth comes into the light. Dom makes his move. An assault on a rundown Russian military base in the frozen tundra of Siberia overrun by terrorists is put into action. A nuclear submarine is stolen. As impressive as all of that sounds, it's hard not to feel like we've seen it all before. A few nicely staged explosions aside, there's just no tension here, while the blatant loose end left at the finale that sets up the reported next two sequels is close to being downright laughable.

Not that anyone will care. The Fate of the Furious will appease longtime fans of the series, the sequel just well made enough that the fact this franchise's tank is starting to get perilously close to empty doesn't feel as big a problem as it honestly should. Personally, I am getting a little tired of it all, and while I appreciated and thrilled to a number of moments, and while I'd honestly love to see a spin-off adventure featuring Johnson and Statham and no one else, I just as genuinely am not so certain I'm up for two more of these films. But they're coming, make no mistake, and I can already hear the engine revving as Diesel and company gear up for the next installment right this very second.


Going in Style a passably harmless comedy remake
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

GOING IN STYLE
Now playing


After their pensions are stolen by both the multinational corporation that's merged with their former employer as well as the bank overseeing the outsourcing of all current jobs overseas, retired steelworkers Joe (Michael Caine), Willie (Morgan Freeman) and Albert (Alan Arkin) have officially had enough. After a little back and forth about the merits of the idea, this trio has come to the conclusion they're going to get what's owed them, every cent of it. They're going to rob a bank, and not just any bank, mind you, but the very one that's conspired with their former employer's new owner to snag their pensions, making them geriatric Robin Hoods looking to redistribute wealth to those who they feel truly need it.

Based on the fondly remembered 1979 film of the same name written and directed by Martin Brest that starred George Burns, Art Carney and Lee Strasberg, Going in Style is about as harmless a comedy as any likely to be released in 2017. Directed by Zach Braff (Garden State) and featuring a reworked script written by recent Oscar nominee Theodore Melfi (Hidden Figures), the movie is an easygoing romp that goes through its familiar motions with confidence and energy. It's a fun enough affair while one is in the moment sitting in the theatre, but none of it is exactly memorable, not a single second, and unlike the original film this one is more than content to keep things on a relatively emotionally nondescript playing field that's honestly rather dull.

Nonetheless, even though none of them are stretching their thespian muscles all that demonstrably, Caine, Freeman and Arkin still make a winning trio. Their interactions with one another are authentic and believable, their jokey rapport having a naturalistic cadence that's easy to fall in synch with. Ann-Margret and John Ortiz both lend able support, as does talented youngster Joey King, each having their own little moment to shine, adding their own bit of idiosyncratic spunk to the proceedings in an ineradicably charming way.

But the movie is never as clever as it felt like it wanted to be, the heist itself a relatively tame and tedious exercise in sound, fury and misdirection that's nowhere near as interesting, funny or suspenseful as it should have been. There's a perfunctory precision to Joe, Willie and Albert's plan that's frankly boring, while a climactic twist and concerns about the consequences of their actions lands with a tiresomely melodramatic thud. I also despised a character portrayed by Christopher Lloyd, the comic relief he is supposed to supply neither funny nor amusing, the whole nature of the role a mean-spirited misuse of a great actor that I found slightly maddening as well as angrily insulting. It should also be noted the Matt Dillon is wasted in a thankless role as the lead FBI investigator working high profile bank robberies, but he's not so much bad as he is given precious little of substance to do.

It's still hard to get angry at Going in Style for any of its more obvious missteps. Equally so, it's also difficult to get too excited about any of its more entrancing moments or scenes. As decent as the core cast might be, as solid as some of the various character moments where we get to know the core principals in greater detail undeniably are, the simple truth is the Melfi's script isn't digging all that deeply and Braff's direction doesn't take a single risk. It's a nice movie, but also an exceedingly safe one, and as such spending any more time than this handful of paragraphs to review it just isn't worth the effort it would take to compose another sentence.


Inauthentic Aftermath wastes a terrific Schwarzenegger
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

AFTERMATH
Now playing


Arriving at the airport to pick up his wife and daughter, who happens to be pregnant with his first grandchild, construction foreman Roman Melnyk (Arnold Schwarzenegger) is shuffled into a quiet room and told the worst news possible: Their plane has gone down. No one has likely survived. Emergency units and airline crash scene investigators are rushing to the site. Roman is understandably devastated, his entire world shattering in an instant, and as the days, weeks and months pass and the analysis into the cause of the crash continues, his grief threatens to overwhelm him.

A seasoned aircraft controller with a wife, Christina (Maggie Grace), and a young son, Samuel (Judah Nelson), whom he loves dearly, the evening shift began like any other for Jack Bonaos (Scoot McNairy). But suddenly left in the tower on his own, facing an extra plane on his screen and a technical problem that's making conversation between varying parties difficult, one thing compounds upon another leading to a horrifying accident. In a second Jack's life changes forever. Right or wrong, he feels directly responsible for the loss of over 200 lives, and as such he's having understandable difficulty moving on from his despair and putting his own psychological pieces back together into something of a cohesive whole.

The opening act of director Elliott Lester's (Blitz) plane crash drama Aftermath is superb. Javier Gullón's (Enemy) eccentrically structured script introduces both Roman and Jack in parallel vignettes, giving both men ample freedom to introduce their respective characters. Lester allows events to play themselves out with naturalistic intimacy thus making the calamitous events the two of them become connected with all the more emotionally bruising. It's a gorgeously heartbreaking start, setting the stage for what should be an affecting examination of grief in all its bruising guises from that point forward.

But that movie frustratingly never materializes. Instead, thanks to a ham-fisted time jump, awkward character evolutions and a couple of key plot transitions that ring agonizingly false, Lester's film refuses to take flight, most notably as things pertain to Jake. There are few opportunities to feel a connection with the devastated aircraft controller, his life falling apart as one imagines that it would yet does so in ways that are cloying, melodramatic and rarely ring true. Additionally, the movie never allows his and Christina's relationship to feel genuine, both McNairy and Grace unable to generate chemistry as they navigate the harsh emotional interiors of a loving couple who find the core components of their relationship seemingly damaged beyond repair.

Schwarzenegger fares better than his costar. Alongside his work in the somewhat disappointing zombie drama Maggie, this is one of the riskiest, more richly complex performances of the action icon's superstar career. He's superb as the demolished Roman, and just for that early scene where the good-humored construction worker learns of the plane crash and has his world destroyed, I'd be tempted to say the film is worth the price of admission just to watch him, its numerous missteps be damned. The power, depth and majesty of this performance builds in aggrieved majesty as things progress, and while the script's various twists do him no favors, and while Lester's grows increasingly oppressive, that does not lessen a single bit the powerful majesty of Schwarzenegger's work.

It isn't enough. Once Roman and Jake end up on a path where collision is inevitable, the film grows less and less interesting as it moves towards an outcome that can't help but feel like a contrived letdown. Everything revolves around the pursuit of forgiveness and the desperate search for someone to say they're sorry, and while that's just fine, the way those dueling quests are represented failed to keep me interested. Lester and Gullón present a number of artificial situations for Roman and Jake to deal with, and while I do not doubt for a second airlines, insurance companies and corporations act in a similar fashion as depicted here, that doesn't mean the filmmakers needed to make the moments when they're front and center so malevolently cartoonish and grotesquely silly.

Aftermath means well. It's a character-driven drama dripping in pain, Lester's latest presenting flawed protagonists unable to put their grief behind them as they deal with an unfathomable tragedy neither had any control over the outcome of. Yet, despite a fantastic opening act, even with Schwarzenegger delivering one of the best performances of his career, the movie proves to be a massive letdown, never crafting an atmosphere that felt authentic and pure. While I wish I felt different, I just don't think the film is any good, the potential it hints at in its early sequences going to waste, and as such I found the finished product almost impossible not to be disappointed in.


Colorfully imaginative Lost Village positively Smurfy
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

SMURFS:
THE LOST VILLAGE
Now playing


Unlike its two perfectly dreadful live action/animated hybrid predecessors, 2011's The Smurfs and 2013's The Smurfs 2, the entirely animated Smurfs: The Lost Village is a fairly solid family-friendly entertainment, especially for younger viewers. It is devoid of any of the bathroom humor, oddly ugly violence and ghastly narrative stupidity that helped mar those previous features to the point they're practically unwatchable, and even though both did reasonably well at the box office it's not like either is remembered with anything approaching fondness. No, this new film, an original story disconnected from its forerunners, is fairly entertaining, and while far from being a top-flight animated effort the darn thing ends up being just smurfy enough to make watching it moderately worthwhile.

While out having fun in the forest with Brainy (voiced by Danny Pudi), Clumsy (Jack McBrayer) and Hefty (Joe Manganiello), Smurfette (Demi Lovato) spies what she believes to be a fellow Smurf running through the crack in the giant wall separating their realm from the Forbidden Forest. Before they can return to the Smurf Village to give this amazing news to Papa (Mandy Patinkin), Smurfette is captured by Gargamel (Rainn Wilson), the evil wizard using his magic to give him an idea where this lost Smurf enclave is hidden.

After being rescued by her three friends, Smurfette feels that these newfound fellow Smurfs are in danger and, worse, it's all her fault. Even though Papa orders her to stay put, the blonde adventurer heads out to the Forbidden Forest intent on finding this lost village and warning the inhabitants that Gargamel is searching for them. She's joined by Brainy, Clumsy and Hefty, all of whom are determined to aid Smurfette in her quest, these four Smurfs intent on going above and beyond in order to ensure they put an end to the wizard's nefarious plans while hopefully meeting new friends who are every bit as smurfy as they are in the process.

This new movie revolves around concepts of friendship and self-discovery. The story is as simple as it sounds, the whole thing focused on Smurfette as she tries to figure out her place inside the Smurf world and discover who she is. It's also a tale of friendship and camaraderie, these four intrepid explorers having to learn how to put their differences aside and use one another's best attributes to their fullest potential if they are going to make their collective way through the Forbidden Forest and find this hidden Smurf village. That's really it, there's not a lot more, screenwriters Stacey Harman ('The Goldbergs') and Pamela Ribon (Moana) keeping things straightforward and simple as they move things toward their suitably heartfelt and selflessly heroic conclusion.

If anything, this new film plays a lot like the old 1980s Saturday morning cartoon series 'The Smurfs' did for nine seasons. Director Kelly Asbury (Shrek 2) takes his talented team of animators and attempts to embrace the late Belgian artist and author Peyo's creations in a way neither of the two live action films did. They treat the characters with heartfelt respect and admiration, allowing them to stay true to their core characteristics while updating certain themes and ideas (most notably as they pertain to Smurfette and concepts of female empowerment) for today's audiences. It's an easygoing, happily relaxed adventure filled with some wonderful sights and sounds, the world of the Forbidden Forest a continually pleasing visual delight overflowing in imagination.

But it all does exist on a reasonably simplistic level, and as entertaining as the film can be for those older than the age of eight the chances anyone is going to remember this one after it comes to an end for anything longer than 15 or 20 minutes are extremely unlikely. The all-star voice cast, which includes the likes of Julia Roberts, Ellie Kemper, Michelle Rodriguez, Ariel Winter, Meghan Trainor, Jake Johnson, Tituss Burgess and Jeff Dunham, are all given precious little to do that's substantive. Only Lovato and Wilson make anything close to an indelible impression, while McBrayer does have a line or two that made me chuckle out loud with a tiny bit more volume than expected.

Still, Smurfs: The Lost Village is easy to sit through, and I know I'm repeating myself here but, once again, young children are likely going to be delighted with the film in ways they never were with either of its live action ancestors. There are also moments of colorful, eye-popping imagination and whimsy that are honestly wonderful, and while I'm not ready to 'sing a happy song' or 'smurf it all day long,' I might just have a few la la la-la la la's running through my head at the moment and, shockingly, I'm perfectly okay with that.


Picturesque Queen of the Desert an emotionally barren letdown
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

QUEEN OF THE DESERT
Now playing


German auteur Werner Herzog is as great a working filmmaker as there is living today. Fitzcarraldo, Aguirre, the Wrath of God, Nosferatu the Vampire, Grizzly Man, Rescue Dawn, Cave of Forgotten Dreams, these are feature films and documentaries where the titles alone clearly speak for themselves. He is a master craftsman fascinated by the unfathomable idiosyncrasies of the human experience, especially as they pertain to Nature's influence upon them, the ways in which people interact with their surrounding, and vice-versa, a core theme that runs through just about every film the director has ever made.

All of which would lead one to believe Herzog would be a brilliant choice to write and direct a biopic about famed British archaeologist, cartographer, writer, photographer, spy and explorer Gertrude Bell, the woman's exploits throughout the deserts of Arabia before and after World War I legendary. She wrote a number of famous books, was one of the few women to hold political power in the British Empire during the early decades of the 20th century, became friends with T.E. Lawrence and traveled the deserts of the Middle East as if she had been born to them. In fact, there's so much to the woman's story it's impossible any one movie could ever do it justice, the sheer volume of history she viewed, documented and helped shape before her death at the age of 57 in 1926 simply staggering.

But if there were a filmmaker up to the challenge of doing it, how could it not be Herzog? And yet, even with Nicole Kidman turning in a lovely, quietly powerful performance as Bell, even with a bevy of solid supporting performances from the likes of James Franco, Robert Pattinson, Damian Lewis, Jay Abdo, David Calder and Jenny Agutter, even with Peter Zeitlinger's (Into the Inferno) stunning cinematography, Queen of the Desert still ends up as nothing more than a colossally head-scratching disappointment. It is a beautiful yet oddly lifeless drama, one that rarely engages the senses or provokes an emotional response. The movie is a picturesque travelogue that never reveals anything about Bell that isn't readily apparent right there on the surface, the script never digging deep enough to reveal the myriad of nuances that drove this woman to such spectacular, world-shaping heights.

Two main plot threads that are moderately revealing are Bell's dual romances, the first with a British Embassy official in Persia, Henry Cadogan (Franco), just before the turn of the century, the second with married British officer Charles Doughty-Wylie (Lewis), stationed in Arabia just before the onset of WWI. These tragic affairs, at least according to Herzog, have a profound impact upon his heroine, substantially augmenting her love affair with the desert and its various inhabitants in lieu of her inability to secure a life alongside either of these two men. It's an interesting detail, and Kidman plays her scenes with both actors skillfully, her reactions when she learns about what has happened to them absolutely heartbreaking in their subtly shattering minutia.

Sadly, as terrific as the Oscar-winning actress is in these moments, it's not like Herzog spends enough time on either relationship for them to be as concrete and as expansive as he obviously aims for them to be. The same could also be said in regards to Bell's friendship with T.E. Lawrence (Pattinson). The two pivotal moments depicted here where the two Arabian giants come into contact are abnormally perfunctory, neither revealing anything major about the ins and outs of the post-WWI Middle Eastern situation. While Kidman and Pattinson are wonderful in these scenes, the youthful giddy enthusiasm of the former coupling marvelously with the cagy, mature professionalism of the latter, like almost everything else in the film they frustratingly add up to very little, this surface-level approach revealing precious little that's substantive.

And that's the movie as a whole. For every amazing scene there are in turn a small handful which look wonderful, are nicely acted and yet still come across as curiously inconsequential. Incredibly fascinating moments begin like gangbusters, like one where Bell finds herself being held prisoner in a desert city under threat to become added to a tribal chieftain's harem, only to quickly crumble into pointless nonsense, the script refusing to find the intricacies of these situations involving the British adventuress almost as if Herzog constructed things that way on purpose.

I honestly don't get it. Films like Fitzcarraldo and Aguirre, the Wrath of God covered situations like this and did so magnificently, finding the balance between the natural world and the human one in ways that were complex, intimate and profound. The director has also done the same in his documentaries, most notably with features like Grizzly Man, Cave of Forgotten Dreams and Encounters at the End of the World. Here, though, the melding never holds, and as stunningly picturesque as all of this undeniably proves to be, Queen of the Desert is a barren emotional quagmire, Bell's incredible story deserving of so much more than this movie sadly proves to be willing to offer.


Seattle Opera's moving The Combat explores the collision between love and religious faith
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New Deep Space Lez beams audience into a universe of Lesbian sci-fi hijinks

Seattle artist amplifies material on stage with April performances of 'Deep Space Lez' at Gay City

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Bob the Drag Queen, Sparkle Leigh and Abbey Roads shine in Peaches Christ's Legally Black!
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Poetry on Buses takes a poetic stand on water

Launches with FREE CELEBRATION April 24

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Johann Johannsson, Deadmau5 bringing completely different music experiences to Seattle this week
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Radiohead astounds with epic performance at Key Arena
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Discover the Unseen at Taproot
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Thought-provoking all-new plays by Washington playwrights engage in

2017 BILL & PEGGY HUNT PLAYWRIGHTS FESTIVAL

April 14 through May 7 - $10 tickets to see two plays!

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White Party Palm Springs May 5-9
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28th Annual GLAAD Media Awards
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4/20 Pot-friendly 'The Gateway Show' to include Queer comic Keith Carey
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Letters
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David Byrne and Perfume Genius take part in Pop Conference this week
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Action-heavy Fate furiously silly
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Going in Style a passably harmless comedy remake
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Inauthentic Aftermath wastes a terrific Schwarzenegger
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Colorfully imaginative Lost Village positively Smurfy
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