Thursday, Dec 03, 2020
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 43 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, March 31, 2017 - Volume 45 Issue 13
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
Three Dollar Bill Cinema co-presents STRIKE A POSE at Northwest Film Forum April 5
STRIKE A POSE
THREE DOLLAR BILL CINEMA
NORTHWEST FILM FORUM
April 5 @ 7pm


Dare to express yourself anew in this heartwarming update on Madonna's 1990 Blond Ambition World Tour backup dancers, showcased in the iconic documentary TRUTH OR DARE. Those seven young men have lived to tell, 25 years later, their wonderfully funny and sometimes bitterly emotional memories and insights, touching on issues such as AIDS, coming out, addiction, and the price of fame. With surprising literal and figurative twists and turns, the dancers (six gay, one straight) open their hearts once more. Fueled by a nostalgic look at the tour and the original film's 'controversies' (the infamous gay kissing scene), and updated with poetic dance vignettes and a poignant score, STRIKE A POSE is a real ray of light.



In 1990, seven young dancers joined pop star Madonna on her most controversial world tour. Wild, talented and barely twenty, the dancers set out on the trip of a lifetime. Their journey was captured in TRUTH OR DARE, one of the highest-grossing documentaries ever. As a self-proclaimed mother to her six Gay dancers plus straight Oliver, Madonna used the film to take a stand on Gay rights, freedom of expression and the fight against AIDS. Madonna's flamboyant dancers became icons of sexual freedom, inspiring people all over the world to be who you are.

At the height of the AIDS epidemic and in the aftermath of the conservative Reagan era, TRUTH OR DARE introduced audiences to fun-loving, bold and larger-than-life Gay characters. The film was groundbreaking, featuring two guys kissing passionately during the famous 'Truth or Dare' scene. Madonna, determined to push the envelope, defended the film ferociously: 'If you keep putting something in people's faces, eventually, maybe they can come to terms with it.' The message stuck: even today, the dancers receive thank-you letters from people around the world recalling how the film changed their lives.

Although they were pivotal to Madonna's message, the dancers weren't living it. In fact, Gabriel wasn't 'out' about being Gay at all. After failing to persuade Madonna to cut out the kissing scene that would out him to his family and friends, he filed a lawsuit against her. A few years later, the 26-year-old died of AIDS, a disease that had shamed him into silence. And Gabriel wasn't the only one. Carlton - big, bold and the only dancer who was trusted to lift up the pop icon - was HIV-positive and almost collapsed under the secret that he was carrying on tour. Years of faking and lying distort his life to this day.

In STRIKE A POSE, we encounter the dancers on a new journey. For the first time they tell us how hard it has been to live the liberated life they were promoting on stage. Their incredible stories reveal how fear of other people's judgment holds us back and how hard it is to accept yourself when you feel different. Twenty-five years after the tour and the film that marked pop and Gay culture as much as their own lives, the dancers, their dramatic stories and their fierce moves inspire us once again. What does it really take to express yourself?



STRIKE A POSE will screen at Northwest Film Forum (1515 12th Ave.) on Wednesday, April 5 at 7pm at part of Three Dollar Bill Cinema's First Wednesday Queer Film Series. Admission is FREE for Three Dollar Bill Cinema members and $12 for Not-Yet-Members. For more information and advance tickets, visit https://www.threedollarbillcinema.org/
Courtesy of Northwest Film Forum and Three Dollar Bill Cinema


Nostalgic T2 an addictively energizing reunion
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

T2 TRAINSPOTTING
Now playing


Twenty years after leaving friends Simon, a.k.a. 'Sick Boy' (Jonny Lee Miller), Spud (Ewen Bremner) and Frank Begbie (Robert Carlyle) sitting in a London hotel room (mostly) empty-handed after an impromptu sale of £20,000 worth of heroin, Mark Renton (Ewen McGregor) returns to his Welsh homeland to ease his weary conscience. He's been living in Amsterdam for the past two decades, trying to put behind him the choices that were made and the moderately selfish reasons that fueled them. But now Renton is back, and while his reunion with Spud has been mutually cathartic, walking back through the door of Sick Boy's bar is a much different animal entirely. As for Begbie, it's best he just stay away from him, the man's notoriously violent temper if anything far worse now than it was 20 years ago.

As much as the fans clamored for it, even though author Irving Welsh wrote about these characters again multiple times, most notably in his 2003 novel Porno, I can't say director Danny Boyle and screenwriter John Hodge needed to get the band back together for a sequel to 1996's Academy Award-nominated cult sensation Trainspotting. Over the years that lightning bolt of a film has deservedly ascended to classic status, its hard-edged look at drug abuse, youthful abandon and cultural socioeconomic imbalances a punk rock free-for-all that hasn't edged a single bit.

Yet T2 Trainspotting works. It is a heartfelt, emotionally cathartic return to this world and to these characters that expands on each man's respective story in ways that are honest, pure and heartbreakingly genuine. These are individuals who have not been able to overcome the demons of the past, and while some have proven to be more successful at 'choosing life' than others have been, each is still haunted by drugs they've taken, the choices they've made and the friendships they for whatever reason chose to leave behind. It's a striking film, and while the freshness and originality of its predecessor understandably cannot be regenerated, the fact Boyle and company don't even make the attempt to do so is actually a refreshing turn of events I can't say I walked into my screening anticipating.

Not that nostalgia isn't part of this story. With a character returning to directly face down the ghosts of his past, it goes without saying it would have to be, the very nature of Renton's return allowing for flashbacks and remembrances of days gone by. But these brief sojourns into wayback machine are coupled with a fresh understanding of where things sit now, how little has actually changed, and that joy without pain or love without loss wouldn't mean near as much if each emotion were not intertwined with its polar opposite. Hodges' script digs surprisingly deep, refusing to offer easy answers or excuse the actions of any of the characters, whether they be happening now or occurred during their collective youths.

Not that there isn't a little bit of a feeling that we've seen much of this before. Renton, Spud, Sick Boy and Begbie may all be looking at their lives through fresh eyes, but that doesn't mean they've changed near as much over this two- decade period as they likely hoped they would. Most of them are still reaching for stars that are clearly outside of their grasp, while for most - not all - of them heroin might be a demon of the past that doesn't mean they've escaped the haunting tragedy of addiction. Nothing that takes place throughout the story equals the shock and awe that accompanied the sights and sounds that filled the entirety of Trainspotting, and as such little packs the same sort of wallop that accompanied numerous moments littered throughout the original film.

Even the main new character introduced here, an immigrant working with Sick Boy named Veronika (Anjela Nedyalkova), is more or less a version of Renton from 20 years prior, only without the addictive personality that led to him self-destructing virtually every time he tried to do anything different with his life. And yet, newcomer Nedyalkova is so good in the role, her chemistry with her costars, most notably McGregor and Bremner, is so undeniably strong, watching her navigate her way through this chaotic reunion is consistently engaging. She's superb, bringing a fresh vitality and a youthful vigor to things that is notably intoxicating.

Frequent Boyle collaborator Anthony Dod Mantle (Slumdog Millionaire, Trance) does a magnificent job shooting things, his camera eloquently recalling the same sort of visual style and aesthetic created by original Trainspotting cinematographer Brian Tufano, yet doing so in a way that adds a sense of maturity and depth that fits the number of years each character has aged. It's a spectacular showcase, edited brilliantly by Jon Harris (127 Hours), and even at almost 30 minutes longer than its predecessor (running just under two hours) there was never a moment I felt things were being drawn out or elongated in ways that were egregious or noteworthy.

I still don't know if this sequel is a necessary animal. There's not a ton new or unexpected that's happening, and as playfully exuberant as the climax might be none of what transpires is close to surprising. But all the actors are superb, especially the two Ewens, McGregor and Bremner, both adding layers of depth and introspection to their respective characters that is hugely impressive. More than that, Boyle directs the film with an energetic enthusiasm that, while not equal to the original, still comes very close to getting there. T2 Trainspotting is a fine reunion, and while the punk portion might not be as raucous as it once was, that doesn't mean these four men have forgotten how to rock one tiny little bit.


Understanding the margins:
Danny Boyle on returning to Trainspotting 20 years later
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

T2 TRAINSPOTTING
Now playing


Trainspotting was not director Danny Boyle's first film, but it was that 1996 adaptation of author Irving Welsh's best-selling 1993 novel that put him, along with actors Ewan McGregor, Robert Carlyle, Johnny Lee Miller and Ewan Bremner on the proverbial map. It was a stratospheric success story, the movie becoming a cultural phenomenon around the world, even earning an Academy Award nomination for John Hodge's adapted screenplay.

After 20 years, Boyle, Hodge, McGregor, Carlyle, Miller and Bremner all return for the sequel T2 Trainspotting, a movie fans have long been clamoring for. Picking up with the four main characters now in their 40s, the movie is a surprisingly frank, brutally honest examination of aging, addiction, friendship and family that, while a much different animal than its now classic predecessor, subtly becomes a vital and poignant drama worthy of respect.

I sat down with Boyle during his brief visit to Seattle right before the sequel's release. Here are some of the highlights from our conversation:





Sara Michelle Fetters: Let's get the question you're probably tired of answering out of the way first. Why now? Why wait 20 years to return to the world of Trainspotting?

Danny Boyle: Well, it's the power of a couple of things, really. The 20-year anniversary is obvious marketing-wise, even though we missed it by a year. It's been 21 years. It's still quite a powerful marketing tool.

It was more the fact of the characters. You make some films which are successful, and some which are not, but they all fade away. They just fade. It's just inevitable and it's part of the process. [Trainspotting] hasn't. People would talk about it on the Tube in London to me all the time. They'd talk about the characters like they were still there. They'd talk about Begbie. And the actors said the same thing. They'd be stopped in the street and asked to say lines. People remember the characters' names. People never remember characters' names from films. They remember the actor that played them sometimes, but never the actual character names. This, they knew all four of their names.

The affection [for the film] maintained its presence, so we continued to talk about it. Flirtingly, sometimes with journalists, like we're teasing. With fans, you tease a little bit. Then I used to joke that you couldn't really do it because the actors didn't look any different because they moisturized. Stuff like that. Gradually, a momentum arose. When you put that together with the 20th anniversary, we met and talked. We tried 10 years earlier at the 10-year anniversary and it hadn't worked. It would have been a very poor experience. It didn't merit going back to it.

Then we came up with something more personal, which is [the story] began to look at aging, I suppose, and the behavior of men over time. Especially how badly men age. It was that. This script emerged and it was like, that's pretty good. I want to make that more than I want to do anything else. I don't care if it's a sequel. I said I'd never do sequels. And, if I did make one, I also said I'd never make a sequel to Trainspotting if all four actors didn't want to return. But we did it. We got them all. They all wanted to do it and it gives them all an equal share, which is unusual in a film. Usually there's a supporting actor, but on this they're all equal.

Sara Michelle Fetters: I was going to ask you, in regards to that script, it's interesting to me that Irving Welsh wrote his follow up novel Porno and his short story that contains some of the characters basically about a decade after Trainspotting, his book, hit store shelves in 1993. [Porno was published in 2002.] Then here we are now roughly another decade later and it is like, in some ways, those characters have aged as they naturally would have. How did Welsh and screenwriter John Hodge run with the screenplay so that it still feels like it fits into the world that you created in that first movie but also within that imagined in those novels and stories?

Danny Boyle: It's interesting, because I'm not sure I see them going entirely like that. When you read them [the characters] in the original books, there are some similarities, but they're also different. Irvine never writes them with influence from the film. He always goes back to his original voice. But he's also entirely encouraging of us to do our version of them, which is through the prism of John [Hodge], our screenwriter, and me. But then, especially, also through the prism of the actors and their personalities, which define who these people are. Renton in the books isn't Renton in the film. Not quite. Likewise, Begbie and the others. It's a weird parallel world [the books and the film] that they run in; equally respectful, but still independent of each other.

Sara Michelle Fetters: Rewatching Trainspotting for what feels like the millionth time, I was struck by the air of hope that you all struck at the end of that film, if not for not all four of the characters, at the very least for two of them. If I'm being honest, I can't tell you how depressed I was to discover that Spud hadn't been able to escape his addictions. At the same time, no matter how sad this revelation might be, it also feels concrete, authentic and genuine.

Danny Boyle: He's honestly lucky that he survived. To spend 20 years on and off heroin like that, he's lucky to have gotten through it, because most [addicts] don't get through it. You see them hobbling around Scotland now, Glasgow and Edinburgh, with one leg because they've lost a leg to infection and all that kind of stuff that goes along with intravenous drug use.

Sara Michelle Fetters: But it seems like a lesser film, one only interested in generating nostalgia for its classic predecessor and not telling its own distinct story, wouldn't have gone there. Might have tried to find a more positive spin for, not just Spud, but for all four characters, 20 years hopefully given them perspective and allowed them to mature.

Danny Boyle: You think? You can't do that. You've got to be honest, especially with these characters. The big invention is obviously Begbie is in jail, which seems fair enough for him. The law is going to catch up with a cycle of violence like that.

I suppose Renton is the one imagining that crisis that he has in Amsterdam has ruined his life in effect because whatever it is he's built, whether he admires it or not, collapses and he's got nothing. This triggers his return. That is, I suppose, bleak in a way when it needn't be. But I'm not sure that you'd ever believe that Renton could hold down a traditional, conventional relationship and build a stable home. Even the fact that he turns up in Sick Boy's bar and says, 'I've got two kids,' and they're imaginary children who he's named, psychologically that's quite devastating, I think. There's a lot of need for atonement and healing.

Yet I agree with you about the ending of the first film. But I also feel the end of this film is also full of possible healing. Some kind of hope. Spud's got hope. There's a sense maybe that they'll all begin to build, no? I don't know. It's honest about them, these four men, I hope. I like that.

Sara Michelle Fetters: What was that first day like? Having them all back together?

Danny Boyle: It didn't work exactly like that, not on the first day. The first day was three of them because in fact, Renton, Ewen McGregor, he was still finishing off his movie [his directorial debut American Pastoral]. He wasn't available for the first two weeks of the shoot. There's never that cute Hollywood moment, where they're all together and there's this big group hug. Unfortunately, that never happened. But there was a great early moment for me, that scene between Begbie and Sick Boy under the pub. That was really a terrific scene to start with. Robert Carlyle and Johnny Lee Miller were on fire straight away. We set the tone for the whole thing, I think, right there.

Sara Michelle Fetters: I know after two decades have past, it's virtually impossible to bring back everyone who worked on the original Trainspotting. It felt key to me, though, that you managed to bring back Casting Director Gail Stevens and Costume Designer Rachael Fleming. Their contributions felt key to me.

Danny Boyle: That's a great observation. With Gail, most of the casting was done from the first film. It's a credit to her, really, acknowledging what she did by putting these people together from the first film. Yet she also had to find new actors who fit in with them and maintain the flow and rhythms of that film, only aged 20 years.

Rachael, because the actors were returning, that process by which they were putting on clothes, obviously the original clothes could no longer fit them. They were literally putting on the overcoat of the past. It's really crucial that they trusted the costume designer. Initially Rachel didn't think she could do it because of her family. She's got five kids now. Then she said, 'I've got to do it.' I was so relieved when she did because it made the whole experience for the actors so much easier than it would have been, than it could have been, if it would have been a different costume designer. There might have been this thing with the actors, where the actors say, 'No, I originally thought this,' and a new designer wouldn't be able to understand where they were coming from. The thing is, when you go back like this, when you've done the first one together, there's no bullshit because you know what one another are like. It made it really great that she was able to do it again.

Sara Michelle Fetters: In regards to you and cinematographer Anthony Dod Monatle, I feel like you two could shoot just about anything right now and make it look incredible. Here, you two, you still had to come up with a visual style that referenced the first film but also moved this one in its own direction. How did that work?

Danny Boyle: There was a lot of respect for Brian Tufano, who shot the first one. Obviously we knew we were going to use bits of the original footage. We were trying to make the film look similar in a way, but obviously have its own principles. Having said that, [Anthony's] principles were really the same as the principles in the first film, which is that you follow the actors. It's the actors and their characters who define everything. It is slightly different to the first film when they're 22, 23 and they behave in a very particular way and so does the film. Now they're 46. They behave in a particular way and so does the film. It's inevitably different because it still follows the characters. Whatever you're going to reveal or show or display comes out of the characters reality. We'd make as many decisions as possible as late as possible and we'd make them when the actors were in the room.

Sara Michelle Fetters: At the end of the day, what do you want people to take away after sharing this new adventure with these four men? What do you hope they're talking about?

Danny Boyle: I think it's the voice. The voices. It's why we started. These voices that you never hear from normally in movies. They're unacceptable to conventional mainstream society and yet they're crucial to us understanding the margins. Weirdly enough, the first film is rather easy on those margins because they're the junkies. Now when all that is behind them, they're beached, stranded, middle-aged men. Yet you still say, no, they're front and center. Let's talk to them and find out what they're about now. I love that. When Spud begins to become the voice of the film and it begins to loop back to the original stories, that's an amazing feeling.


Entertaining Zookeeper's Wife a poignant lesson in selfless heroism
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE ZOOKEEPER'S WIFE
Now playing


Based on a true story and adapted from Diane Ackerman's best-selling book, The Zookeeper's Wife tells the story of a Polish zookeeper and his animal-loving wife who together conspire to liberate Jews from the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II. Under the guise of having transformed their zoo into a pig farm with a goal of providing meat for the German war effort, the pair saved an estimated 300 souls, hiding the majority of them in plain sight right under the Nazi nose. It's an astonishing tale, one that defies belief, director Niki Caro (Whale Rider, McFarland, USA) and screenwriter Angela Workman (Snow Flower and the Secret Fan) treating the material with a level of self-control that allows the inherent dramatics to work on their own without extra melodramatic embellishments.

It is 1939, and all of Poland is on edge. When her husband Jan (Johan Heldenbergh) urges her to take their young son and retire to the country, Warsaw Zoo co-owner Antonina Zabinski (Jessica Chastain) refuses to leave either their home or the animals they both love when invasion is still only a faint possibility. But after their city is bombed and their zoo is left in ruins, it is immediately clear that the German threat is no longer theoretical. While friend and zoologist Lutz Heck (Daniel Brühl), in charge of the Berlin Zoo and now responsible for the surviving animals under the Zabinski's care, promises to do his best to keep them protected, both Antonia and Jan are understandably concerned their lives as they once knew them have been irrevocably changed forever.

They're right, but not in the way they initially assume. Once the city's Jewish population is thrown into a fenced-in ghetto, the Zabinski's realize something must be done. Using the underground tunnels, cages and pens that they once used to transport animals from one point in the zoo to another, Jan and Antonia start shepherding Jews out of the Warsaw Ghetto, hiding them until plans to get them out of the country to freedom can be formulated. It's risky, putting not only their lives in danger but that of their children as well, and with the suspicious Lutz always lurking around the chance that their plans will be discovered remains perilously high throughout the entirety of WWII.

This is a very good movie, more often than not a superb one. Caro and Workman craft an elegant, spellbindingly personal opening act, setting up Antonia's character with luxurious ease, Chastain building the foundation for the woman's eventual transformation from shy animal lover to determined resistance fighter beautifully. They also do a great job introducing Antonia's connection with the egotistical, smugly pompous Lutz, these early moments setting the stage for the emotional manipulations and interpersonal entanglements to come once the Zabinskis set their plans into motion.

Time does pass a little strangely in the movie, and it's not always easy to keep up with the transitions as the months and years go by. There are also a handful of little moments that aren't as deftly performed or defined as so much of the remainder proves to be, Jan's part in the Polish Resistance not developed near as well as I felt it should have been. I also can't say I responded to the petty pangs of jealousy the zookeeper showcased as they pertained to his wife's manipulations of Lutz, those moments the only ones where I felt like Workman's script wasn't up to par.

Thankfully, Caro directs with a confidently clever hand, never overplaying things, allowing the emotional storm front surging through Poland, and the world, during that period of history to do the heavy lifting. She goes for a documentary-like approach at the most opportune of times, the sequences where Jan journeys into the Ghetto to ferry out small groups of Jews in the refuse bins he's been supplied by the German Army to collect food for the pigs back at the zoo especially effective. The first trip is heartrending, a moment of absolute abhorrence and depravity portrayed with such candor and restraint it left me bruised and battered in a way it never could have had Caro chosen to take a more exaggerated approach.

Chastain, who is also one of the film's executive producers, is terrific, delivering a complex, nakedly raw performance that speaks volumes. While her Polish accent does waver at times, overall she digs right to the core of Antonia, bringing this woman to life in ways that are consistently compelling. Veteran Belgian character actor Heldenbergh is also wonderful, having a lovely, lived-in chemistry with his costar that's masterful. As for Brühl, he's good, if a little over-the-top, his latter scenes as the German war effort goes south and Lutz descends into uncontrolled paranoia nowhere near as interesting as his work early on proves to be.

Gloriously shot by Andrij Parekh (Blue Valentine) and handsomely edited by David Coulson (North Country), the movie moves at a zippy, if still never rushed, pace, Caro orchestrating the action as well as she ever has in any of her previous pictures. The veteran director moves in and out of the world that's been constructed for her here with haunting grace, Antonia and Jan's loving relationship the moving center all else is continually focused upon. The Zookeeper's Wife is excellent, the Zabinski's story an important lesson in heroism that proves to be as entertainingly compelling as it is fascinatingly essential.


Nicely acted Wolves an emotionally deflated nightmare
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

WOLVES Now playing

The sole reason to watch writer/director Bart Freundlich's (The Myth of Fingerprints, The Rebound) latest melodramatic endeavor Wolves is for star Michael Shannon and for Michael Shannon alone. No surprise there, the two-time Academy Award nominee turning in an explosively hypnotic performance as a hard-living, emotionally volatile writer with a gambling addiction who is slowly destroying the lives of his wife and son. He is incredible as ever, and while the movie doesn't offer him anything particularly difficult to do, the actor makes his moments crackle with an invigorating electricity that's practically impossible to resist.

Good thing, too, because, once again Freundlich has delivered a motion picture that oozes in potential, yet also frustratingly refuses to do a darn thing of merit with virtually a single ounce of it. This movie runs on cliché and is fueled by emotional treacle, dripping into overblown schmaltz at the worst moments, reveling in these instances of excess in ways that are consistently maddening. It derails what should have been a simple, delicately balanced coming-of-age story of a kid coming into his own while struggling to step out of the shadow of a hot-tempered parent, and as such Freundlich's latest ends up being nothing short of an exasperating waste of time.

Anthony Keller (Taylor John Smith) is a basketball prodigy and an A-plus student on the cusp of earning a scholarship to Cornell. He adores his girlfriend Victoria (Zazie Beetz) and would do just about anything for his loving mother Jenny (Carla Gugino). The problem is his father Lee (Shannon), a respected English professor and successful author who is as egotistical as he is self-destructive, the man's mounting gambling debts putting him increasingly at odds with local mafia enforcers. Things get even worse when Victoria announces she might be pregnant, Anthony increasingly unsure of what is the right course of action as everything around him spirals out of control.

It's fairly obvious stuff, and for the most part Freundlich presents it all in as rudimentary a fashion as he can. The director even throws in a pair of curmudgeonly father figures for Anthony, a former New Jersey Nets player named Socrates (John Douglas Thompson) and a devoted uncle, Charlie (Chris Bauer), both of whom offer advice and insight in manner that feels like it was lifted straight out of an Inspirational Fiction 101 course taught at a local community college. While the actors do what they can with the roles, neither character is particularly interesting outside of the words of wisdom they have to offer the struggling 18-year-old, only existing inside this story to push the narrative forward to its familiar conclusion and for seemingly no other reason.

Granted, all of the actors are good, newcomer Smith doing a fine job making an impression. He and Shannon have great chemistry, their aggressive give and take easy to watch no matter how silly or sophomoric the dialogue their both spouting ends up proving to be. Gugino is also solid, and even if her character is thinly written, becoming nothing more than another in a long line of thankless suffering mothers trying to do the best she can for her children seen in countless melodramas made since the invention of celluloid, the actress still gives Jenny just enough life and idiosyncratic impudence to make the woman worthy of keeping an eye on. Additionally, the basketball sequences are impressively mounted and staged, cinematographer Juan Miguel Azpiroz (Saving Grace) shooting them with a bouncy fervor that's rousing.

But it's Shannon who lights up the screen, and without him it's hard to imagine this effort would be worth talking about. While the character falls inside the actor's established wheelhouse, that doesn't mean he still doesn't approach the role with the same sort of tenacity and gusto he brought to previous performances in films as diverse as Nocturnal Animals, 99 Homes, Take Shelter, Premium Rush and Revolutionary Road. All of which makes it a monumental shame that Freundlich's hackneyed script and uninspired direction ultimately lets him, the other actors and ultimately his latest feature down so completely. Wolves shoots way too many air balls, its inability to find the basket making this dramatic teenage hoop dream nothing short of an emotionally deflated basketball nightmare.


SGN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Peaches Christ and Bob the Drag Queen present 'Legally Black' at the Egyptian April 6th
------------------------------
Bad Panda a great way to go beyond yourself
------------------------------
SGN EXCLUSIVE:
Strike a Pose
An interview with Salim 'Slam' Gauwloos

------------------------------
Scotland's Teenage Fanclub
------------------------------
Ariana Grande gives a dangerously good performance at Key Arena
------------------------------
April theater openings
------------------------------
Sleek production might not be enough for Dry Powder
------------------------------
MISS RICHFIELD 1981 coming to Seattle with '2020 VISION: A SURVIVAL GUIDE TO THE NEW WORLD!' April 20 & 21 at Century Ballroom
------------------------------
Thirsty Girl Productions presents 3rd Annual Seattle Boylesque Festival April 21 & 22 at The Triple Door
------------------------------
Impressively mounted Life devoid of originality
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
Letters
------------------------------
Fleet Foxes, Animal Collective announce Seattle shows
------------------------------
Three Dollar Bill Cinema co-presents STRIKE A POSE at Northwest Film Forum April 5
------------------------------
Nostalgic T2 an addictively energizing reunion
------------------------------
Understanding the margins:
Danny Boyle on returning to Trainspotting 20 years later

------------------------------
Entertaining Zookeeper's Wife a poignant lesson in selfless heroism
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2017 - DigitalTeamWorks 2017

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News