Saturday, Oct 24, 2020
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 43 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, January 27, 2017 - Volume 45 Issue 04
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
Compelling 20th Century Women perfectly imperfect
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

20TH CENTURY WOMEN
Now playing


It is the summer of 1979, and Jamie Fields (Lucas Jade Zumann) is in the process of figuring out who he is and the type of man he potentially wants to be. Inside his southern California home, the boy's opinionated and intelligent mother Dorothea (Annette Bening) is doing the best she can to raise her son as she feels is right. But she's worried that, considering their large age differences, she doesn't always have a firm handle on what's going on in his life, doesn't know if she can relate to all the cultural influences vying for his attention. As such, she enlists punk artists Abbie (Greta Gerwig), currently renting a room in their home, and teenage neighbor Julie (Elle Fanning) to assist her in helping Jamie find himself.

Together, these three women try to give advice when they can and offer up new experiences when appropriate, each in their own way becoming a vital cog in the youngster's life. But Jamie isn't entirely certain what to make of all this, and whether it's worrying that his mom isn't interested in raising him or dealing with the early pangs of romantic longing as it concerns the slightly older Julie, all of it becoming almost too much for him to process. Still, together they're all going to find a way to muddle through, and in doing so develop a bond that, even though it might not last forever, sure as heck is going to feel like it will.

From Beginners writer/director Mike Mills, 20th Century Women is a sparkling, intimately moving drama of growth, friendship and family that springs to life with invigorating authority, its easygoing truth rapturous to behold. This is a coming of age story where the feminine angle of growth is explored with stunning complexity, the filmmaker stepping back in order to allow his primary characters the freedom to roam around and evolve with naturalistic grace. There is nothing rushed here, nothing overbearing or false, and as such the emotional terrains Jamie finds himself traveling through become all the more potently poignant than they ever could have otherwise.

Bening is incredible. She's as incredible as she's ever been. More, her performance as Dorothea builds on many of her past triumphs, pieces of Myra Langtry (The Grifters), Virginia Hill (Bugsy), Carolyn Burnham (American Beauty), Sue Barlow (Open Range), Julia Lambert (Being Julia) and Dr. Nicole 'Nic' Allgood (The Kids Are All Right) all readily apparent in one form or another throughout the film. Bening's restraint is coupled with her fearless ability to not care a single lick about how glamorous she looks at any given moment. Free of artifice yet also filled with an excitable eccentricity that's infectious, she makes Dorothea come alive in continually surprising and multifaceted ways, this woman a true original that's impossible to forget.

More than that, though, Mills isn't interested in perfection. If anything, he finds something even more incredible and long-lasting in failure, in taking stock of a situation and having the inner strength to admit when you've made mistakes, believing that the power to do so is far more inspiring than creating a façade that missteps are impossible. Better, this doesn't just apply to Dorothea, Abbie and Julie just as liable to take a left step when a right was what was called for. It gives this vibrant trio a vivacity that's continually inspirational, and even when things go off the rails the belief the train can be put back onto the track undamaged is omnipresent no matter what.

But it isn't just Bening, Gerwig (who, it must be mentioned, has likely never been better, and that includes her award-worthy work in 2012's Frances Ha) and Fanning are extraordinary. So is Billy Crudup. Portraying another tenant renting a room in Dorothea's house, I just love how this mechanic and handyman slinks and saunters his way through the film with such cocksure personality. It's as if Crudup is portraying an older, wiser and a little bit beaten down variation on his rock star iconoclast Russell Hammond from Cameron Crowe's Almost Famous, and even though this film and that are roughly set right around the same time there's an intriguing symmetry between the two men that's glorious.

Some sequences do work better than others, and Mills wraps things up with a little more tidiness and finality than this otherwise sprawling slice of late '70s Americana requires. There's also a climactic coda that, while fun and informative, also feels slightly flippant in a way nothing else in the movie can be compared to. It's not that I didn't like what the director did here so much as I felt it was plainly unnecessary, these insights into the otherwise uncertain future giving rhyme and reason to interior dynamics I'd rather have been left ambiguous so I could have imagined many of the ins, outs and various possibilities all on my own.

Even so, 20th Century Women is superb. Brilliantly acted, lovingly shot by Sean Porter (Green Room) and seamlessly edited by Leslie Jones (Rules Don't Apply), Mills shows that the near virtuoso brilliance of Beginners was hardly a fluke. While maybe not as instantaneously magnificent as that Oscar-winning drama proved to be, that does not make this follow-up any less wonderful. I loved this movie, and I have a sneaking suspicion my opinion of it will only grow as the years pass on by.


Haunting Julieta a profoundly human mystery
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

JULIETA
Now playing


Julieta (Emma Suárez) has just learned her long lost daughter Antía (Blanca Parés) is still alive. After a chance meeting with her child's former best friend Beatriz (Michelle Jenner), the middle-aged single woman is understandably struck by this revelation. See, back when Antía turned 18 she cut off all ties to her past, leaving Julieta to wonder why things turned out the way they did and what part she played in her daughter's seemingly sudden need to disappear.

Julieta, based on a series of stories written by Nobel Prize winning author Alice Munro, bends through time and space with ease, legendary Spanish auteur Pedro Almodóvar (Talk to Her, Volver) weaving back and forth between memories of heartache, rapture, tragedy and love with eloquent precision. It is a movie that exists in that nether world sitting in that realm that lingers between past and present, allowing for a deft, complex and beautifully understated examination of the nightmares that haunt us and the small delicate ecstasies that hug the individual like a warm blanket on a cold winter's night.

I'm not sure which facets of the film I love more. The present day material with the world-weary, if yet still ready to tackle all challenges, Julieta is masterfully complex, even when an initial glance at what is going on might lead the viewer to ascertain otherwise. Suárez delivers an extraordinarily multifaceted performance, much of it internalized and almost every piece played close to the vest. Yet there is a bracing openness to what the actress is doing, a miraculous rawness to this portrait of grief and resilience that grew on me in power and majesty as the film progressed.

But then there are the portions set years prior concerning Julieta's whirlwind romance with Xoan (Daniel Grao), an enchantingly masculine fisherman who sweeps the young college student off of her feet. Played during these portions by the stylish Adriana Ugarte, there is a graceful eloquence to these sections that are haunting in their subtle, authentically human intricacies. So much transpires during these years, including Antía's birth, her growth into a poised, clever youngster (Priscilla Delgado) and the cementing of her close, sisterly friendship with Beatriz (Sara Jiménez), all of it influenced by a sudden tragedy that will affect both her and her mother's lives forever.

Both sections flow into one another with dexterous elasticity, Almodóvar moving from one story back to the other with confidence. He melds all of Munro's loosely connected stories into a seamless whole, allowing for moments of introspection and realization that left me dumbstruck while also reaching for a tissue. This is a story where truth isn't always the answer and honesty doesn't heal every wound, the scars left by happenstance, innuendo and loss ones that can't ever be erased yet can just as clearly still be healed. Julieta's resilience and ability to carry on is cause for celebration, and while not all of her decisions are ones to applaud, each still stands out as being made by a woman of intelligence and fortitude who refuses to quit on either herself or those that she loves.

I will say, as deeply sincere as all of this is, it did take a little while for my overall reactions to the film to make themselves known to me. Almodóvar, like he has done numerous times in the past in many of his prior classics, refuses to make things easy on the viewer. The crushing blow of Antía's disappearance and the apparent reasons behind it are sharp and angry, while metaphorical images of Julieta's travels, especially via train, can initially appear heavy-handed and obvious.

But the reality for both items is anything but what those first impressions imply, and it wasn't until I spent time pondering all of the ins and outs of Almodóvar's weaving of Munro's stories did it suddenly strike me just what it was the gifted filmmaker was attempting to do. The sheer bravado of it all is coupled with the vaporous sophistication he brings to the table, the broad plain of emotions being explored remarkable. I'm shaken in ways that go beyond description, the long-lasting impact of Julieta's story one deserving of additional exploration and discussion, not to mention multiple viewings. Julieta is superb, and to say any more could potentially ruin any number of its more intimate surprises.


Metaphorical Dog's Purpose an emotional mutt
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

A DOG'S PURPOSE
Now playing


A dog (voiced by Josh Gad) is born and begins to wonder why it is here. Eat? Sleep? Run? Play? Is that all there is? Maybe it's about making friends with these 'people' things running around on two legs? Are they important? One of these creatures takes particular interest in the Golden Retriever, an 8-year-old boy named Ethan Montgomery (Bryce Gheisar). He loves the dog, even gives him his own name, calling him Bailey, and for the fluffy four-legged mammal being with this kid, loving him dearly, that's exactly what he's been put here on this Earth to do.

Years pass. The dog gets older and after a decade of faithful and loving friendship sadly dies, only to be reincarnated as a female German Shepherd working for a courageous Chicago police officer named Carlos (John Ortiz). After that life ends, the dog returns again, this time as a cute Corgi adopted by kindhearted academic Maya (Kirby Howell-Baptiste), watching her go from struggling college student, to doe-eyed girlfriend, to confident wife and mother in the blink of an eye. The dog comes back once again, this time as a giant Australian Shepherd/St. Bernard mix who is mistreated horribly by its owners. But, released into the wild to figure out how to get by all on its own, the animal comes across a peculiarly familiar farmer (Dennis Quaid), the smell coming off this kind gentleman unmistakably recognizable.

Okay. So as far as the new movie A Dog's Purpose from three-time Academy Award nominee Lasse Hallström (My Life as a Dog, The Cider House Rules) is concerned, there's obviously one heck of a lot to unpack here. Based on the best-selling book by author W. Bruce Cameron, who is just one of the five screenwriters credited with the adaptation, the story is a canine-view of life and its myriad of mysteries. It's a metaphorical tale of friendship, heroism, forgiveness and fate that travels through roughly a half-century only to arrive back where it started, its themes as obvious and as ham-fisted as they are oddly affecting and sincere. In short, those that choose to go with the flow and let the not-so-subtle emotional charms fueling things work their magic are likely to come out of the theatre sobbing in heartfelt joy. Everyone else? Well, they'll have a bone to pick with the film, and it's likely they won't be able to stop barking about their issues, if that's the case.

Another item to keep in mind? Unlike Marley & Me or Old Yeller, the latter of which is the far superior motion picture even if both tend to get mentioned in the same sentence, the dog at the center of all this fantastical melodrama doesn't meet its end in some climactic way designed to resolve the story and tug at the heartstrings. No, this dog dies a good half-dozen times, only to return in a new form to live a supposedly different life. That means the viewer has to watch the pooch go into the Great Beyond again and again and again and again. Hallström does what he can to not make each death an assault on the emotions, using a variety of camera tricks combined with Gad's calming voiceover to help him do it, but these are still images of sadness involving a cute, cuddly dog, and as such they can feel more than a little assaultive and supercilious just by their very nature.

That's all that. As far as the overarching story is concerned, as my synopsis should have made clear, this is an episodic tale that plays as a series of shorts. Each reincarnation is attached to its own tale, and while the one concerning young Ethan (who eventually matures into an 18-year-old young man portrayed by K.J. Apa) is the main one all roads emanate from and eventually return to, Hallström and the writers do their best to give each short at least a semblance of complexity and depth. Some are noticeably better than others, the one involving Howell-Baptiste and her romantic insecurities easily the most interesting and thoughtful of the bunch.

However, as well made and as lovingly shot by cinematographer Terry Stacey (Elvis & Nixon) as all of this might be, I'm still hard-pressed to figure out what the point is. Having not read Cameron's novel, I can only imagine that it goes even further inside the thought process and mental meanderings of the frequently reincarnated hero. I can also only think that the segments that don't play particularly well here, most notably the one involving Ortiz's police officer, are not because the veteran character actor is bad, he's terrific, but more because it's impossible to ascertain why anyone would want to watch his segment. It's like someone inserted some unrelentingly depressing short about how crummy life is and that you shouldn't fall in love with a single darn thing because it will only be taken away from you; and while I'm certain there's something commendable about showcasing such doom and gloom, in this instance I'm not sure I, or for that matter the filmmakers, know what that is.

On the flipside, Gad's voiceover work is surprisingly restrained, never becoming as maudlin or as syrupy as it easily could have been. Additionally, there's a terrific supporting performance from Britt Robertson, portraying Ethan's teenage girlfriend Hannah, the young actress conveying oceans of emotional information in a single glance. There is also a beautiful climactic moment between Quaid and his version of the reincarnated animal that brought a smile to my face, leading to a couple of final images that hit the exact note Hallström was likely going for.

Even so, the story just wasn't my thing. Watching the title character die, come back, die, come back and then die and come back again and again, it's so blatantly manipulative that no matter how sincere the intentions of the filmmakers might be I just couldn't deal with it all for the entire length of the film's two-hour running time. Couple in the bizarrely unpleasant segments where misery rules the day and redemption appears impossible, A Dog's Purpose left me stuck in emotional quicksand, escaping not so much impossible as it just felt like a waste of my time.


Insanely silly Xander Cage makes a satisfactorily extreme return
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

xXx: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE
Now playing


After faking his death and more than a decade away from the spy game, government agent Jane Marke (Toni Collette) has tracked down the elusive Xander Cage (Vin Diesel) with designs on bringing him back into the espionage fraternity. A team of crack operatives led by the charismatic Xiang (Donnie Yen) have stolen a top secret device with the power to rain satellites down upon unsuspecting targets as if they were bombs, making him a lethal threat unlike any the world has ever known. But what gets Xander onboard for a new, top secret mission is the knowledge his former mentor Augustus Gibbons (Samuel L. Jackson) was one of the early targets, and it would only be right to make sure those out to kill him are dealt with in a fashion he would have approved of.

But unlike his solo assault against Anarchy 99, this time the extreme sports enthusiast isn't going to be able to take on Xiang all alone. With Marke's help, Xander assembles a group of like-minded crazies including crack sharpshooter Adele Wolff (Ruby Rose), excitable stunt driver Tennyson Torch (Rory McCann), light on his feet electronic music sensation Nicks (Kris Wu) and bubbly computer whiz Becky Clearidge (Nina Dobrev). Thing is, once they're all face-to-face with Xiang and his compatriots, mostly notably balletic wild woman Serena Unger (Deepika Padukone), it becomes apparent nothing is as it seems, the threats facing this new Triple-X team far more lethal and corrosive than any of them could have anticipated before their mission began.

It's been fifteen years since xXx became a surprise box office success during the summer of 2002, and while the studio did attempt a follow-up, xXx: State of the Union, starring Ice Cube back in 2005, without Diesel it was almost as if the franchise was over with before it even had a chance to begin. But, taking a cue from his Fast and Furious success, the actor has found a way to reinvent the brand, xXx: Return of Xander Cage a multiethnic action extravaganza that's more about the team than it is about any one hero. As such, even with a January release date there's so much energy driving this sequel there's a great chance it could do boffo business with audiences, the action set pieces at the center of all this craziness almost worth the price of admission all on their own.

Taking over the reins for original director Rob Cohen, Disturbia and Eagle Eye veteran David Caruso brings a sense of enthusiastic silliness to the film that's oddly charming. He treats Xander's return as if it's a 107-minute Looney Tunes cartoon, filling the screen with one obnoxious set piece after another, almost as if he's treating F. Scott Frazier's (The Numbers Station) suitably absurd script more as a vague template than an actual instruction sheet he and his team of cinematic technicians are supposed to follow. The insanity of it all comes perilously close to being obnoxious, the fact Caruso manages to keep it from being so as superhuman an achievement as any of the crazy stunts showcased inside the film itself.

The plot is both overly complicated and idiotically simple. The basic thrust of the MacGuffin driving these two dueling teams of extreme sports and martial arts enthusiasts is actually totally unimportant as far as the great overarching narrative is concerned, all of it just an excuse for Diesel, Yen, Thai superstar Tony Jaa and the remainder of the actors to strut their collective stuff. It's stupid, but purposefully so, and for those willing to check their brains at the door and just let the adrenalized silliness work its magic there's honestly plenty to enjoy.

Much like he did in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, Yen steals the show. He's a charismatic demon, a wizard of martial arts mayhem whose magnetism is undeniable and charm leaps off the screen. Honestly, it's hard not to walk out of the film wishing the movie had all been about him and no one else, and even though Caruso sometimes over edits the sequences featuring him it's a testament to the Ip Man and Iron Monkey superstar's talents that he's as continually as amazing as he always proves to be. No one else comes close to equaling him, and I have to give Diesel props for allowing Yen to become the focal point whenever his character is up on the screen.

Not that the titular star isn't at his best. Honestly? Diesel appears to be having a laidback blast coming back to the character of Xander Cage, and it feels like it has been ages since he's been this easygoing and appealing. The fun he appears to be having actually rubs off on the viewer, and although I'm no admirer of the first film I was reminded why so many of us were fans of the actor back in the days of the first xXx and the original The Fast and the Furious.

Caruso could have used Jaa better, and for the life of me I have no idea the reasons why Wu's character is in the movie other than he has an ability to get large scantily clad crowds of young people to dance like there's no tomorrow. As stated, none of this makes a lick of sense, Frazier's script remarkably dimwitted, and while I applaud how many strong, intelligent women there are here it's not like the film is so progressive it still can't revel in an extended sequence where Xander proves his bedroom prowess in about as sexist a manner as possible.

Not that I can't say I didn't have a surprisingly decent time watching xXx: Return of Xander Cage. As dumb as it all might be, that doesn't make the majority of it any less entertaining. Caruso stages one terrific action set piece after another, and while some work decidedly better than others (a chase sequence involving dirt bikes riding the waves like gas-powered surfboards is frankly laughable, while on the flipside a climactic bout on a plummeting cargo plane showcasing Yen in all his balletic glory is downright outstanding), when added together all of them get the job done in a highly satisfying way. As long-in-coming sequels go, this one is far better than it has any right to be, and if it ends up being a hit I highly doubt we'll end up waiting another 15 years to see Xander Cage come back for another extreme adventure.


Energetic and ambitious Gold cinematic pyrite
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer GOLD
Now playing


Kenny Wells (Matthew McConaughey) comes from a family of prospectors, his grandfather striking it rich in the middle of the Nevada wilderness and ultimately setting up a small but successful mining business in Reno. Nearly six decades later and after taking over leadership of the company after the passing of his own father (Craig T. Nelson) from a sudden heart attack, Kenny is down to his last dollar. With things looking bleak, with the business' stock price falling to pennies on the dollar, this wild man who once had a nose for gold sells everything he has of value and heads to Indonesia on a hunch. He's going to meet up with geologist Mike Acosta (Edgar Ramirez) and together they're going to do something that the whole world will be talking about for years to come, consequences be damned.

Loosely inspired by real events, Stephen Gaghan's (Syriana) satirical drama Gold plays like some sort of bug-eyed, whiskey-swilling love child of The Wolf of Wall Street and The Big Short. Set at the tail end of the 1980s, it's a what-if piece of can-do entrepreneurial spirit mixed with Wall Street greed crossed with intelligently underhanded sleight of hand. Most of all, it is a movie built on an unlikely friendship, Kenny and Mike coming from different worlds yet still able to reach a level of understanding and camaraderie that allows the appearance that they've done something extraordinary to cheerfully arise. They are the beating heart that drives everything that transpires over the course of the film, this bond that develops between the two concrete and sincere.

Appearances are deceiving, however, and as complex as their relationship might be, the actual happenings lurking at the center of Gaghan's film are much more serpentine. What starts as a crazy idea of gut instinct gone haywire on Kenny's part suddenly morphs into what is potentially the largest gold strike in decades, investors and Wall Street bankers suddenly falling over themselves to get in on the action. Fortunes come, and fortunes go, and what looks like a sure thing for all involved also catches the eye of the FBI, things going from uncomfortably tenuous to inconceivably awesome to horrifyingly scandalous in what seems like the blink of an eye.

In some ways Gaghan, working from a script by Lara Croft: Tomb Raider screenwriters Patrick Massett and John Zinman, wants to tell a cautionary tale reminiscent of what ends up happening to Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. In another, he wants to rip American bankers and stock brokers a new one much like Martin Scorsese did with The Wolf of Wall Street and Oliver Stone managed with Wall Street. Then there are the crazed jungle adventure aspects that play like a half-assed variation on Werner Herzog's Fitzcarraldo, what that all adds up to heck if I know.

Thing is, I don't think the filmmakers do, either, the tonal shifts happening throughout happening with jarring suddenness creating a sense of structural unease the film has trouble figuring out what to do with. As terrific as Gaghan's Syriana might have been, he doesn't appear to have any idea how to mix the comical, topical, dramatic and satiric elements in ways that are either edifying or rewarding. Instead, there is an unfocused whirlpool of emotional excess that is created in all of this zaniness that only occasionally hits the right notes, building to a conclusion that's too ephemeral to be even vaguely agreeable.

Not that Gold is a lost cause. First things first, McConaughey is superb, transforming himself completely and in every way imaginable to play the character. He's a slithery, chain-smoking mess, fast-talking his way through every situation as he tries to reach something close to the same level of success his father and grandfather did before him. It's a sweaty, monumentally fascinating performance, one that showcases the actor very near the top of his game, McConaughey fearlessly going for broke as he makes a variety of decisions running the gamut between selflessly heartfelt and selfishly callous while also making a number of intriguing pit stops along the way.

Ramirez is also excellent, and I just loved how he managed to play things so close to the vest yet still managed to make Mike a richly textured character overflowing in intriguing complexities. Bryce Dallas Howard is also very good as Kenny's long-suffering girlfriend Kay, her reactions and careful analysis of her beau's sudden good fortune and the potential misery that could come from it movingly heartfelt and perceptively spot-on. Finally, there's also a nice, if much too brief, appearance by Bruce Greenwood as a mining conglomeration bigwig that's loose, cagey and filled with eccentric charm, and it's a major pity the movie doesn't do more with him than it ultimately does.

The rest of the talented cast, including Nelson, Corey Stoll, Toby Kebbell, Bill Camp, Macon Blair, Stacy Keach, William Sterchi and Rachael Taylor, are unfortunately more or less wasted, all of them adding a bit of color to the proceedings but little of actual substance. There's just enough going on in Massett and Zinman's script for any of them to latch onto and make their own, each doing the best with what they have even if what's actually there is hardly worthy of their collective efforts.

I always feel bad coming down on a film like Gold. Gaghan's latest is a risky venture with a lot on its mind, mixing fact and fiction together to come up with a cinematic mirror that reflects back to the viewer topical images that aren't always easy to witness. The thing is, if the combination isn't right, if the balance is off, then good intentions and lofty ideals don't end up meaning a single thing substantive, making the finished feature nothing more than celluloid pyrite barely worth the cost of a rental let alone a full-blown first run multiplex ticket.


A mother's quest:

ArtsWest presents luminous staging of Mothers and Sons

------------------------------
Rufus Wainwright performs at Pizza Klatch fundraiser in Olympia February 4
------------------------------
February theater openings
------------------------------
Queen + Adam Lambert coming to Key Arena this summer
------------------------------
She made it after all: Mary Tyler Moore was a beloved and inspirational TV icon
------------------------------
AND THE AWARD GOES TO...

Seattle Theater Writers announce the winners of the 2016 Gypsy Rose Lee Awards

------------------------------
Strawberry Theater Workshop presents an accomplished production of Proof
------------------------------
Lavish and lovely - The King and I at the Paramount
------------------------------
2017 QUEER PRESS GRANT NOW ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
JoJo interview next week ahead of Seattle show, Sasquatch lineup unveiled
------------------------------
Compelling 20th Century Women perfectly imperfect
------------------------------
Haunting Julieta a profoundly human mystery
------------------------------
Metaphorical Dog's Purpose an emotional mutt
------------------------------
Insanely silly Xander Cage makes a satisfactorily extreme return
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2017 - DigitalTeamWorks 2017

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News