Tuesday, Sep 17, 2019
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 42 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, July 15, 2016 - Volume 44 Issue 29
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
Funny Ghostbusters remake a call worth answering
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

GHOSTBUSTERS
Now playing


Just because I'm a film critic doesn't mean I'm not just as human as the next person. As much as I'd like to say I let every movie work in and of itself, as often as I proclaim that, once the lights go down, once that curtain opens, I'm ready for whatever it is I'm watching to work its magic upon me come what may, that doesn't mean I'm entirely free of bias or preconceptions. Based on my reactions to his past comedies, it's hard for me to get all that excited when a new Adam Sandler opus comes calling. I'm also not exactly big on making it a point to rush out and watch any adaptation of a Nicholas Sparks novel, the components that seem to fuel each and every one of his stories ones I've discovered I've never been all that particularly fond of.

It happens with sequels and remakes, too. A lot of times it's hard not to wonder if the world actually needs another Spider-Man reboot, that heading back to Isla Nubar for Jurassic World is a great way to spend one's precious time or that Matt Damon returning for Jason Bourne is done for artistic reasons and not something akin to a quick cash grab. But whereas bloated megabudget misfires like Independence Day: Resurgence help add fuel to this fire of early apprehension, beautifully realized winners like The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Creed and Star Wars: The Force Awakens showcase just how silly those pre-judgments can be. Heck, as amazing as the trailers were, it's not like many, myself included, didn't wonder what the heck George Miller was doing when he decided to head back into the wasteland thirty years after the fact for Mad Max: Fury Road. Ten Oscar nominations and six wins later, I think we can all safely say it worked out for him and his film just fine, the sequel proving to be a bona fide sensation with critics and audiences alike.

With director Paul Feig's new take on Ghostbusters, the kneejerk reaction is to wonder why this property needed to be resurrected or rebooted in the first place, the 1984 classic with Billy Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis, Sigourney Weaver and Ernie Hudson not exactly showing its age. Same time, if one is going to remake a classic cinematic property, if they are going to tackle an iconic franchise, Feig and his The Heat collaborator Katie Dippold certainly went about doing it the right way. While not entirely successful, while almost too referential at times to its Ivan Reitman-helmed predecessor, this is a fun, frisky and most of all funny reworking of the familiar tale, throwing caution to the wind as it sends an entire new set of paranormal investigators into the fray, all of whom prove to be more than capable of answering the call when the phone rings for assistance.

Taking basic elements of Aykroyd and Ramis' original scenario, Feig and Dippold don't necessarily flip the script as much as the casting of four actresses, Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Leslie Jones and Kate McKinnon, might initially lead one to believe. While the origin elements are little different, what primarily still brings the team together is the threat of paranormal chaos running rampant throughout New York, everything culminating in a moment of solidarity and triumph where the Ghostbusters are the only one's capable of saving the day. Yet Feig and Dippold ground things in modern sensibilities and realities that are both comforting and controversial, asking a handful of very tough social questions under the guise of green, slime-filled comedic silliness.

After a falling out ten years prior, childhood friends and accomplished research scientists Erin Gilbert (Wiig) and Abby Yates (McCarthy) find themselves thrust back together when a supernatural event at a local tourist attraction draws their attentions. With the aid of the latter's associate Jillian Holtzmann (McKinnon), a tech wizard with a knack for designing and creating the most marvelous of inventions, the pair quickly come to the realization that, ghosts aren't just real, but they actually have the tools to catch them. But their paranormal endeavors jump to the next level when transit authority clerk Patty Tolan (Jones) enlightens them to strange goings on in the subways, her insight into the city's rich, and oftentimes macabre, history exactly what the trio need to see their research blossom.

It's easy to figure out what happens next. The group start up a business, they publicly hunt some ghosts, end up getting ridiculed for their efforts, uncover a sinister supernatural plot that will devastate the Big Apple, confront a not-so-befuddled Mayor (a sublimely dopey Andy Garcia) about what they've learned and end up arriving at just the right moment to save everyone in the city from annihilation. Again, while the names have changed and the themes are updated, the basic narrative elements remain the same, and as such precious few story beats come as a surprise.

And that's okay because, exactly like the 1984 film, Feig is more concerned with building character and story than he is anything else, going out of his way to make sure Erin, Abby, Jillian and Patty are complex, fully-realized human beings and not just walking talking punchlines good for a couple of extra belly laughs. These are real women with real problems, ones who use their brains to get the job done, knowing they are just as capable of ascertaining the truth and coming up with solutions as any man might think themselves to be. What's more, they enjoy themselves, and whether it's testing out Jillian's fantastical gadgets in an alley or facing down a class-four vapor at an Ozzy Osbourne concert, these women are ready to face down whatever hardship might end up coming their way.

The movie, much like Jurassic World and Star Wars: The Force Awakens before it, is almost too referential to its ancestor, fitting in various callbacks to the '84 film that can feel awkward or forced depending on when they've been inserted into the plot. Also, the film's villain, a nebbish nobody named Dean (Steve Higgins) with nondescript designs on seeing the world burn, just isn't good, a total non-presence who adds little if any value to whatever scene he happens to be part of.

But, also like those two smash hits from last year, this Ghostbusters has energy and vitality to spare. More than that, it shows that there is more than enough juice in this story and this franchise to warrant a new version. Feig directs with confidence, his and Dippold's sharply measured script is filled with a number of exuberantly exhilarating high points and both Wiig and McCarthy prove to be exemplary stand-ins for Murray and Aykroyd. Even better are Jones and McKinnon, these two sketch comedy dynamos stealing scenes left and right as they bring their two intriguing, craftily inspired characters to effervescent life. They are both stars in the making, the latter in particular, showcasing a go-for-broke evanescence that's so impressive it borders on being Oscar-worthy.

There's plenty more to love, not the least of which is the crafty way Feig utilizes cameo appearances from many of the original cast members as well as an inspired bit of loopy silliness on the part of Chris Hemsworth (portraying the team's flighty, if physically well put together, receptionist Kevin). If this Ghostbusters isn't perfect, it's still a wonderful reinvention that's as entertaining and as it is fun to watch. More than that, it celebrates the charms of the original while also intelligently forging a fresh path new generations of moviegoers are sure to be delighted with. If studios are going to continue mining their catalogs for fondly remembered favorites they feel are in need of a remake, reboot or sequel, Feig and company have certainly delivered the template as to how best to do it. Who you gonna call? These ladies. And right away.


Tension-filled Infiltrator a solidly absorbing real-life thriller
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE INFILTRATOR
Now playing


After a major bust leaves him injured, Federal Agent Robert 'Bob' Mazur (Bryan Cranston) could have retired with full benefits. But the veteran undercover operative has a new idea, one that could snare a number of major players in the world of international drug smuggling and money laundering. He wants to hurt the Columbian cartels where it matters most to them, in the pocketbook, and even with his long-suffering wife Evelyn (Juliet Aubrey) urging him to call it a career, Bob just wouldn't feel good about himself if he didn't see this job all the way through until the end.

Working with a new partner, freewheeling undercover operative Emir Abreu (John Leguizamo), the pair quickly find themselves climbing the ladder of Columbian and Panamanian bigwigs, including Pablo Escobar confidant Roberto Alcaino (Benjamin Bratt). With the help of rookie Kathy Ertz (Diane Kruger), forced to pretend to be his amorous fiancé after a monetary slip of the tongue on Bob's part, the veteran agent discovers he's actually starting to like Roberto and his lovely wife Gloria (Elena Anaya). But the job still comes first, and friendship can't be a part of the equation, and if Bob or his team thought they were going to ensnare game this big without suffering a few bumps and bruises during the hunt they'd have been dead wrong.

Adapted from Mazur's 2009 book The Infiltrator: My Secret Life Inside the Dirty Banks Behind Pablo Escobar's Medellín Cartel, director Brad Furman's The Infiltrator is a strong return to the form he confidently displayed with 2011's The Lincoln Lawyer and somehow lost hold of with 2013's disastrous Runner Runner. Working from a detailed, highly literate script by his mother Ellen Brown Furman, the filmmaker displays a kinetic versatility organizing and shaping all of the based-on-fact thrills and chills that drive this story to its conclusion. While he isn't reinventing the genre wheel, Furman still manages to craft a film that captures the attention right from the get-go all the same, and as such this tidy little suspenser had me suitably captivated for all of its briskly paced 127 minutes.

Still, it does feel like in some ways the director's latest could have delivered even more of a punch. I'm normally one to applaud brevity, but in the case of The Infiltrator less isn't necessarily more. The relationship between Bob and Kathy could have carried some additional weight, and as such their blossoming friendship with Roberto and Gloria doesn't build to the type of shattering conclusion it so richly deserves. The intricacies of the financial puzzle the agents are deconstructing can also be more than a little confusing, and as such keeping track of who is who and what part they play in all of this drug-fueled madness is oftentimes difficult. As for supporting player Joseph Gilgun (playing a mob enforcer who owes Bob some sort of debt and so joins him in attempting to bring down Escobar's cartel), I kept feeling like there was far more to the story than the movie was given the opportunity to tell, his character too ephemeral to matter yet too intriguing to comfortably dismiss.

It is a testament then to just how universally strong the acting is and how grand the set pieces Furman engineers are that the film ends up mattering near as much as it does. There is a phenomenal sequence involving Leguizamo dealing with his primary snitch, a sequence that builds in electrifying intensity as it hurtles towards its conclusion. There's also a sensational moment where Cranston is blindfolded and take to a secret location to meet with another of Escobar's lieutenants (terrifically underplayed by Yul Vazquez), the extents the Columbians go to ensure he's someone they think they can trust chilling to the core.

Amy Ryan steals scenes left and right as the hard-changing agent in charge of the operation, while Oscar-winner Olympia Dukakis pops up in a delightful cameo as one of Bob's relations who just so happens to be the perfect person to help him cement his growing relationship with the pensive, intelligently cautious Roberto. As for Bratt, he's superb, delivering his best performance since 2009's La Mission, maybe even surpassing his Emmy-nominated work on 'Law & Order,' the avalanche of emotional cadences he circles through during the climax extraordinary.

But as good as they all are (and I haven't even mentioned Kruger or Aubrey, both of whom are divine), unsurprisingly the reason to get excited about all of this is Cranston and, to a slightly lesser extent, Leguizamo, both of whom are just marvelous. The former inhabits Bob with ease, while the latter makes, not just the most of his limited screen time, but also gives one of the finest performances of his entire career. Together they make for an invigorating Mutt and Jeff team, their insecurities and apprehensions of being forced to work with one another authentically giving way over time to a form of mutual understanding and respect that's just about perfect.

Like he did with The Lincoln Lawyer, Furman shows a knack for this kind of down-and-dirty genre fare. While the movie never gets as deep as I maybe would have liked it to, that doesn't make it any less absorbing. Mazur's story just defies belief, the fact it all happened, he and his team's efforts leading to one of the biggest international drug busts in recent history, comes close to blowing the mind. All of which helps make The Infiltrator a memorable, tension-filled thriller well worth the price of a ticket, one I'd be happy to give a second look to sometime in the very near future.


Mike and Dave proves Anna and Aubrey deserve better scripts
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

MIKE AND DAVE
NEED WEDDING DATES
Now playing


Brothers Mike (Adam Devine) and Dave Stangle (Zac Efron) are fun to be around, their hard-partying, go-for-broke antics amusing everyone they come into contact with. Only problem, they also manage to inadvertently wreck every family gathering they are a part of, and with that being the case younger sister Jeanie (Sugar Lyn Beard) orders the two to not arrive at her Hawaiian wedding stag. If they do? She's given their father Burt (Stephen Root) permission to send them packing, and considering just how much the young woman loves and adores her brothers this is the last thing she wants to happen.

In need of dates for the wedding, Mike and Dave go on a quest to find the perfect women to join them in Hawaii for Jeanie's nuptials. When Alice (Anna Kendrick) and Tatiana (Aubrey Plaza) drop into their lives, they believe they've found them, the two ladies appearing to be, not just warm-hearted and emotionally genuine, but also just the type of smart, successful and independent go-getters their entire family will approve of. So it's off to the Hawaiian Islands for all four of them, Mike and Dave excited to be following through on Jeanie's request certain her wedding is about to go off without a single solitary hitch.

Of course, that's not what happens in Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates. Alice and Tatiana are not sweet-natured, twinkly-eyed girls next door. The two male Stangle children almost can't help themselves when stupidity and chaos come calling. It's the type of raunchy, go-for-broke comedic scenario R-rated tales of absurdity like this are built on, director Jake Szymanski and writers Andrew Jay Cohen and Brendan O'Brien (the pair behind both Neighbors flicks) not skimping in their quest to shock, offend and hopefully produce a theatre overflowing in laughter.

Which makes my silence during the promo screening disappointing. I didn't respond to this story, didn't care about Mike or Dave, watching them be so idiotically stupid not doing anything for me. The pair of numbskulls never become fully-formed characters. They're dimwits, nothing more, nothing less, and with little else happening around them that captured my attention spending so much time with these two brothers turned out to be massively irritating. Not that I didn't laugh. I did. There are a handful of absurd, undeniably silly moments that got me to snicker. There is also an underlying sweetness to Cohen and O'Brien's script that is moderately surprising, and even if there's not a lot of story cohesion going on there is just enough of it to make sitting through the movie all the way to the end somewhat easy to do. As goofy and as raucous as things are, as stupid as it undeniably is, the fact the filmmakers have their hearts in the right place does go a fairly long way, and as such I imagine there will be a number of people who end up enjoying this madness far more than I did.

It helps that, as ill-conceived and at times ugly as their characters might be, Kendrick and Plaza are so gosh darn terrific watching them navigate their way through this rubbish can be magical. The two of them are a sparkling comedic team, riffing off one another with ease. Even when the filmmakers transform Alice and Tatiana into nothing more than male fantasy figures who are just as uncouth and socially inveterate as any man, the actresses are dynamite, Kendrick in particular, each lighting up the screen with a ferocious glee that's inspiring.

But gosh did I find a lot of this tiresome. Devine, who can be appealing as a minor player, adding jolts of comedic inspiration in films as wildly divergent as Pitch Perfect and The Final Girls, is close to unbearable as a lead, his one-note antics growing increasingly tiresome as events progress. As for Efron, he's fine, as pretty much always, and his fearless abandon as it pertains to his willingness to look like a total dumbass is as commendable as ever. Yet he's just as clearly going through the motions, having done this so many times now he's on the verge of becoming typecast, and as such I got the feeling he was here to pick up a paycheck and very little else.

The slapdash quality of the filmmaking does no one any favors, the sloppiness in regards to narrative cohesion close to nonexistent. There is no sense of continuity, things fitting together more because they have to in order for events to keep cascading out of control more than because the story itself requires them to in order for one piece to snuggly fit with the another sitting right there next to it. While I won't say Szymanski does a bad job of assembling this nonsense into a single whole, I just as clearly cannot claim his handling is as confident or as exact as it needs to be, and as such the film spirals outside of his control far too often.

With all that being so, it really is a testament to just how superb both Kendrick and Plaza are (and I should probably add Beard, too, as she's pretty good as well) that I didn't despise Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates, let alone that I could end up taking away something moderately close to enjoyment out of any one part of it. While the movie isn't something I can recommend, this does not mean I did not laugh, and for fans of the two actresses watching it isn't the type of unendurable chore it far too easily could have been.


Latest Tarzan dangles from a vine of pointless indifference
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE LEGEND OF TARZAN
Now playing


The good news in regards to director David Yates' (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows) African adventure The Legend of Tarzan is that it doesn't spend a heck of a lot of time going through the famous character's backstory. Instead, screenwriters Adam Cozad (Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit) and Craig Brewer (Black Snake Moan) make the assumption most, even if they've never read any of Edgar Rice Burroughs' novels or have seen any of the countless cinematic incarnations (ranging from Johnny Weissmuller, to Christopher Lambert, to an animated Disney version, to numerous additional takes in-between), already know who Tarzan is and what it was that made him that way. While flashbacks to the death of his parents and his being raised by a pod of apes are present, by and large the writers allows the viewer to fill in the blanks all on their own, thus making sure the bulk of the tale's running time is spent on the central story at hand and precious little else.

While technical aspects are strong, especially as they pertain to the motion capture effects utilized to bring the African beasts running through the jungle to life, sadly this is the end of the good news. Even though Yates is able to stage some solid chase sequences, while Henry Braham's (Nanny McPhee) cinematography is lush and electrifyingly alive, none of this is enough to compensate for just how unremarkable this adventure proves to be. Anemically by-the-numbers, blandly plotted to the point excitement becomes nothing less than an endangered species, watching this movie is a shockingly dull way to spend a couple of hours, and I have trouble believing even if I'd seen it as a child I still would have cared whether or not this Lord of the Apes would save his lady-love while also making sure his beloved Africa was not destroyed by unscrupulous European invaders.

British Lord John Clayton (Alexander Skarsgård), known the world over as Tarzan, is invited by Belgian King Leopold II to revisit his former home in the African Congo, ostensibly to see all of the good his regime is claiming to be doing there. But American George Washington Williams (Samuel L. Jackson) believes otherwise, convincing Clayton it is worthwhile to return to the place of his birth and see what is happening to the indigenous peoples residing there for himself.

So with wife Jane (Margot Robbie) joining them, the two men set out on this adventure. But things are far from what they've been told, the dastardly mercenary Leon Rom (Christoph Waltz) fooling Clayton with an offer from King Leopold in order to fulfill a bargain with warlord Chief Mbonga (Djimon Hounsou). His people rule a secluded land sitting on top of a gigantic diamond mine, and in order for him to grant the Belgians access to it he wants Tarzan's head on a spike. Rom intends to give it to him, and in doing so unleash a terrible genocidal plague across the African continent the likes of which the world has never seen before.

That all actually has the makings for a pretty solid adventure, and one I'd like to think Yates is more than capable of bringing to life. But the movie never finds its dramatic feet, lurching around uncomfortably as it desperately tries to romanticize its Caucasian hero without belittling or marginalizing the Africans, whose continent it obviously is, in the process. Yet this line proves to be impossible for the filmmaker or his screenwriters to be able to walk upon, and even by adding Jackson to the mix as an American haunted by his days hunting Native Americans in the western frontier, the story's inherent 'White Savior' problem still bites them all in the butt all the same.

Even so, that's not the most obnoxious or glaring issue. The simple truth here is, The Legend of Tarzan just isn't any fun. It's all just so mundane and pedestrian, maintaining interest for anything longer than a couple of minutes proves to be an almost insurmountable chore. If I'd have been at home watching this play out on television it is likely I'd have either turned the channel or fallen asleep, the latter the more likely outcome. The story wanders around with little to no urgency, and even after Rom gets his hands on Jane in order to trick Tarzan into saving her, I honestly could have cared less if the two jungle love birds ever got back intertwined within one another's loving arms.

Skarsgård looks terrific, his abs doing almost all of his talking for him, and Jackson is in fine, if familiar, form as his new compatriot tromping through the jungle right alongside him. Robbie is maybe the best of the central trio, adding a spunky, energetic element to the proceedings that's absent whenever she isn't around. Problem is, even though her character proclaims herself to be anything but a damsel in distress that is exactly what Jane turns out to be, Tarzan's beloved pretty nothing more than fetching eye-candy he has to go to ever-greater extremes in order to save.

It does not help that Waltz, for all his talent and charm, phones in his villain, and other than a couple of novel turns of phrase that almost feel as if they were lifted from Django Unchained or Inglourious Basterds, the majority of the time he looks incredibly bored. Which is more than can be said for Hounsou, the two-time Academy Award-nominee once again stranded with a one-dimensional heavy that's as stereotypical as it is a waste of talent. The actor deserves better, no question, and the fact Hollywood seemingly refuses to make good use of him is a travesty of monumental proportions.

There is a pretty good fight scene between Tarzan and one of his simian family members; and a flashback showcasing what happened to his mother while he was still a young man learning the ways of the jungle is overflowing in the kind of emotional maturity and intimate complexities the rest of the picture is sadly lacking in. But the final battle itself is a shocking letdown, a sound and fury onslaught that represents nothing long-lasting or substantive. The Legend of Tarzan isn't so much bad as it is forgettable, Burroughs' iconic character left dangling from a vine of pointless indifference the likes of which he's never had the misfortune to grapple with until now.


Dispiriting Secret Life of Pets an animated dog
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

SECRET LIFE OF PETS
Now playing


The idea at the center of The Secret Life of Pets isn't a new one, but that doesn't make it any less terrific. The concept of what our beloved pets are doing in their time alone has been an animated staple the world over, animators ranging from Walt Disney to Tex Avery to Chuck Jones to Hayao Miyazaki, to so many others taking a look at it in one way or another during their historic careers. It's just one of those thought provoking questions anyone who has ever owned a dog, cat, rodent, bird or any other creature has wondered about at some point during their tenure as a pet parent, animation a perfect platform to explore thoughts and ideas relating to it.

As such, the opening introduction to this particular film is just about perfect. It's here we meet Max (voiced by Louis C.K.), a terrier who lives with his perky owner Katie (Ellie Kemper) in a gigantic apartment building deep in the heart of New York City. Things are perfect, the adorable canine spending the hours she's away at work chatting with fellow pets living in the complex, including lazy, self-centered cat Chloe (Lake Bell) and perky white puffball Pomeranian Gidget (Jenny Slate) who can barely contain her romantic longings for her furry brown neighbor. But when Katie brings home gigantic mutt Duke (Eric Stonestreet) to live with them Max's world is shattered, and the only thing he can think about now is the best way to get rid of the beast so things can go back to normal.

It's all sounds very Toy Story, this opening not all that different in its way from how Sheriff Woody and Buzz Lightyear make one another's acquaintance at the beginning of that 1995 Pixar classic. More to the point, this initial sequence of events is instantly endearing, piquing my interest while also capturing my heart. Writers Ken Daurio (Despicable Me 2), Brian Lynch (Minions) and Cinco Paul (The Lorax), director Chris Renaud (Despicable Me) and co-director Yarrow Cheney do a wonderful job setting things up, and for my part after the first ten minutes I was incredibly excited to discover where the lot of them were going to take things next.

I shouldn't have gotten my hopes up. The group, I imagine emboldened by the success of Minions, take things in increasingly outlandish and annoyingly violent directions, allowing the film to descend into madness and chaos seemingly because they all collectively believe that's what kids will find entertaining. What they appear to be going for is some sort of crazy, over the top reworking of ideas present in animated efforts as diverse as The Aristocats, All Dogs Go to Heaven, Oliver & Company and A Bug's Life. Problem is, there is no story cohesion, no semblance of structure holding one strand of the narrative together with the one strung alongside next to it. Worse, it all grows increasingly off-putting as things progress, the distasteful central twists and turns getting uglier and more noxious with each passing minute.

The central twist here involves Max and Duke getting lost in the wilds of the Big Apple, literary forced into the sewers as they come across a gigantic gaggle of displaced critters intent on showing their former human masters they're not as all-powerful as they think they are. Their leader is an angry bunny named Snowball (Kevin Hart), and to call him one of the more annoying animated characters to grace the screen in quite some time is a giant understatement. Hart tries his best, his rat-a-tat-tat delivery not without its humorous charms. But Snowball is a vapid, insipidly composed character whose loathsome qualities are never tempered to the point they could ever be redeemed, tolerating him or his antics pretty much impossible.

Like Minions, and to a lesser extent the two Despicable Me adventures that first introduced the yellow pill-shaped nincompoops, the filmmakers turn The Secret Life of Pets into a series of vignettes, short little bursts of adrenaline that barely relate one to the other. It's a lot of crazy lunacy that includes massive depictions of rampant destruction, acts of ghoulish carnage and a lot of shrill moralizing that's moderately offensive. But the worst thing the filmmakers do is waste their premise, turning it into a random circus of chase and escape that barely relates to the ideas present in the opening act and promised right there in the title. The movie isn't good, the fact that it could have been, arguably should have been, is maybe the most dispiriting aspect of all this nonsense, and it's likely my disappointment makes me despise it even more than I potentially would have otherwise.


Matt Leisy: A Gentleman's interview
------------------------------
Adele returns to the Emerald City for back-to-back concerts at Key Arena
------------------------------
It's '60s time again at Twister Beach
------------------------------
EMMYS 2016:

RuPaul, Sarah Paulson, Ryan Murphy, Lily Tomlin lead LGBT nominees for TV's big award

------------------------------
Taproot present Big Fish
------------------------------
OUTBOUND: Lights, camera, Oahu!

Zac Efron comedy is the latest of many movies and TV shows filmed on the island

------------------------------
Live Girls! Theater presents Things You Can Do
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
Seattle Pride is an expression of our Constitutional rights
------------------------------
Phillip Phillips feels right at home with Southern food, gay fans, and playing his music on stage
------------------------------
Funny Ghostbusters remake a call worth answering
------------------------------
Tension-filled Infiltrator a solidly absorbing real-life thriller
------------------------------
Mike and Dave proves Anna and Aubrey deserve better scripts
------------------------------
Latest Tarzan dangles from a vine of pointless indifference
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2016 - DigitalTeamWorks 2016

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News