Wednesday, Dec 12, 2018
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 42 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, April 22, 2016 - Volume 44 Issue 17
Jim J. Bullock finds his comfort
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
Jim J. Bullock finds his comfort

by Eric Andrews-Katz - SGN A&E Writer

KINKY BOOTS, THE MUSICAL
THE 5TH AVENUE THEATRE
April 27-May 8


Jim J. Bullock is best known for his work as Monroe on television's 'Too Close For Comfort.' Currently, he is touring the country in the hit musical Kinky Boots (music and lyrics by Cyndi Lauper). The journey from beginning to end is a story of dealing with closeted Hollywood, watching loved ones die of AIDS while struggling with drug abuse, to the triumphant recovery and career that followed. Eric

Andrews-Katz: Who were your earliest influences in becoming a performer? Jim J.

Bullock: My earliest influences were probably Carol Burnett, Paul Lynde, and Jerry Lewis. I seemed to have gravitated to the funny people.

Andrews-Katz: Your original plans were to become an evangelical Christian minister. What happened to change your mind?

Bullock: I grew up as a singer in the Church. That was sort of my platform. My faith was - and still is - a very big part of my life. I sort of wanted 'faith-action' - to work in the Church and go to college and get a degree, and be one of those Televangelist Ministers.

Andrews-Katz: How did you first meet (and subsequently work with) ex-televangelist Tammy Faye Messner?

Bullock: Through Fox TV. They wanted to put together a show and asked me if I would be interesting in hosting with her. They had her in mind already, and wanted to put a co-host that was gay. They brought me in, and that's how we met.

Andrews-Katz: Tammy Faye received backlash from her community for working with a 'gay man,' but did you ever get any commentary from the gay community for working with a 'televangelist'?

Bullock: No. Not that I remember. All gays loved Tammy. She was always so kind and sweet, so what's not to love? There was nothing not to love about her. She was fun and fabulous. So no, I never got any backlash from the gay community.

Andrews-Katz: Hollywood was closeted in the 1980s. Was your orientation a secret, or was it considered an undisclosed fact?

Bullock: It was one of those things that I had not made that definite choice [within] myself yet. I was still struggling within myself; with my upbringing, God, religion, and I didn't want to disappoint my parents in any way. I didn't want to hurt them. I first hid it, thinking it could hurt my career. As it turned out, it didn't hurt my career. I don't know if it helped my career, but it was what it was at a time when it couldn't be anything else.

Andrews-Katz: Is it the duty of GLBT actors to come out and become role models for others?

Bullock: Well, that is a good question. I have to think about that. Just because someone is born a certain way doesn't mean they have to be the 'Poster Child' for that cause. Using myself, I don't want to speak about anyone else, I didn't know what the GLBT community was in the '80s. I don't think anyone did! Gay Rights was still in its infancy. I always felt that if I wanted to come out with my own preference that was my choice. And if I didn't want to, it was my choice. I like it when people come out and say, 'Yes, I'm gay. It's ok and wonderful,' and it is if everyone felt that way, to express themselves. For whatever reasons, maybe fear within their personal lives, people have their own reasons to come out or not, and you have to allow them that. You can't say, 'You have to be this, Bitch!' It's wonderful when they do, but I don't think that simply because you are something, you have to be a spokesperson for it. I just want to live my life.

Andrews-Katz: What does live theatre offer you that television does not?

Bullock: Exhaustion. You know live theatre is that opportunity to be in front of an audience, and whatever happens&happens. You have to roll with it. There is no cutting and going back to do it again. It's a relationship with the audience and it can be wonderful. It can also be NOT that wonderful. It's a living thing and never ever ever the same twice. I love theatre; it's hard doing eight shows a week, and demanding. TV is also demanding, but my experience has always been that it's easier. Give me a game show, Honey! I may feel that way. but I'm happy to be working, whether it's in TV or film or stage, and Kinky Boots is a great show.

Andrews-Katz: What is it about Kinky Boots that seems to have captured audiences around the world?

Bullock: It's the heart of the show, the truth of the show. There's a universal truth that when you change your mind you change your world. It's to treat each other with kindness and with respect because we all have to get along somehow, and we are all different. We need to figure that out and it's a hard time doing that. Kinky Boots is a reminder yet again of that. And aside from having great music, it's a great show! You get everything you want from it - it's a full entrée.

Andrews-Katz: There are many in the GLBT community suffering from substance abuse. How did you finally come-to-terms with your own struggle?

Bullock: I have to attribute that to having a good foundation in life. I was lucky to have my faith and my family. I had friends who love me and care for me, and I had a sense of self. That's a good way to phrase it, 'a sense of self,' and I don't need to elaborate on that. I had Angels (and I do believe in them) looking after me in Heaven, those people who have gone on before me, looking after me. It was Divine Intervention. It was hard. It's like being in quicksand where the more you struggle with it; the deeper you get sucked into it. It's hard to break free. Crystal is EVIL!

Andrews-Katz: If you could play any role - regardless of any limitation - what would it be and why?

Bullock: This is a giant question. The first one that comes to mind is Mama Rose in Gypsy. Wow! I have to wrack my brain and think. There's nothing I've ever said, 'If there were no holds barred&' Well, right now, to play a role right now, they'd all be powerful women roles: Fanny Bryce in Funny Girl, or Eva Peron [in Evita] all powerful women. Years ago I wanted to do Seymour in Little Shop of Horrors&but I guess there's no real role that I'm dying to do or pining away for. I didn't know about Kinky Boots until it came along. The same way for Wilbur [in Hairspray], and I'm fortunate that these roles have come along and that I have lived long enough to do them!



Jim J. Bullock was raised in Texas in a Southern Baptist home. After moving to Los Angeles he became a household name from his role on 'Too Close for Comfort.' His career continued to include: Prince Valium in Mel Brooks' Spaceballs, Neal Tanner on 'ALF,' The Eyes of Tammy Faye, and the voice of the title character on the animated series, 'Queer Duck.' Mr. Bullock is currently touring as George in the Cyndi Lauper musical, Kinky Boots.

Tell a friend:

Share on Facebook  Share on Facebook

Post to MySpace!Share on MySpace!

    Share on Delicious

Share on StumbleUpon!

Paul McCartney rocks and rolls for nearly three hours at Key Arena
------------------------------
End of a purple reign:

Music icon and genius Prince passes away

------------------------------
Jim J. Bullock finds his comfort
------------------------------
La Femme Magnifique Pageant returns to Neighbours May 1
------------------------------
Starbucks Chorus sponsors Street Requiem benefit concert to help homeless

Local artists form 150-person choral ensemble to benefit King County's homeless

------------------------------
Stupid Fucking Bird at ACT Theatre
------------------------------
Coppelia is fabulous!
------------------------------
New City's The Tempest a rewarding experience
------------------------------
Impressionistic Miles Ahead a jazzy riff on musical genius
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
'Gay gene' study makes no such conclusion
------------------------------
Joan Osborne, appearing at Jazz Alley this week, says 'there's a lot to love' about Seattle
------------------------------
Tykwer's Hologram a royal dramatic achievement
------------------------------
Terrifying Green Room a tension-filled gem
------------------------------
Huntsman a fun, if unnecessary, fairy tale sequel
------------------------------
My Golden Days a melancholic remembrance of youth
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2016 - DigitalTeamWorks 2016

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News