Saturday, Sep 21, 2019
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 42 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website


Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com

Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




 

 
 

 

 

[Valid RSS]

click to go to advertisers website
to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, January 29, 2016 - Volume 44 Issue 05
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
45 Years an emotionally rapturous masterpiece
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

45 YEARS
Now playing


Kate (Charlotte Rampling) and Geoff Mercer (Tom Courtenay) are making plans to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary. But as preparations near completion, a past mystery comes back to haunt them, forcing the pair to look at one another in a light they never have before. Back in 1962, Geoff was on holiday in Switzerland with his then girlfriend Katya, the pair hiking a glacier when tragedy struck. All these years later, the body has finally been recovered, officials letting the longtime married Brit know about it as he was the closest thing to next of kin they could find for her.

There's not a lot more to say as far as plot is concerned in regards to writer/director Andrew Haigh's (Weekend) sophomore feature 45 Years, itself a loose adaptation of the short story by writer David Constantine, yet the film itself is extraordinary. Beyond that, if I'm being honest, what the director accomplishes is so sensational by the time his latest came to an end it had taken my breath clean away. This is a tale with no heroes, no villains, just one filled with life, loss, understanding and, most of all, love, Kate and Geoff's journey towards their anniversary party as universal and as human as any that has ever graced the screen.

The big deal is just how understatedly sincere Haigh manages to make things. Kate and Geoff know all there is to know about one another, so much so they can go almost an entire day without saying nary a word yet still are able to communicate volumes. All of which makes each Mercer's reaction to the discovery of Katya's remains startling. Geoff becomes obsessed, almost preternaturally compelled to revisit his relationship with the woman he almost married, initially not comprehending why his wife is so shocked by it all. Kate wants to be supportive, wants to be the good wife who understands what her husband is going through, yet the realization that he potentially loved another, maybe more than he does her, pushes buttons she didn't even know she possessed.

This is the battle that rages throughout the remainder of 45 Years, one with few raised voices, not many arguments and very little in the way of confrontation. Yet tension rises throughout, Kate and Geoff learning more about one another in these few days before the anniversary party than they potentially knew at any point during the 45 years they've spent happily married. The truth about Katya isn't so much a shock to the system as it is a reminder of how unforeseen twists in life's design can throw even the most contented and conscientious into something akin to a tailspin, and how only through communication and dialogue can things ultimately be set right.

Having never read Constantine's short story, I do not know how closely Haigh's script mirrors it. Even so, the latter's screenwriting is some of 2015's finest, the subtlety driving the character transformations magnificent. Haigh doesn't preach, never overextends, instead allowing revelations to come gradually, and as such the pair's marriage feels all the more natural and concrete because of this. Watching Kate crumble as she learns more about Geoff's time with Katya is heartbreaking, her single-minded tenacity to keep planning their anniversary party making her frustrations in regards to these ever-expanding feelings of jealousy all the more naturalistic.

Both Rampling and Courtney are superb, and while the performances do draw from their youthfully iconic turns in films like Georgy Girl and The Damned for her, and The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner and Billy Liar for him, there is a unique, utterly transformative quality to the duo's work that sets it apart from anything either has done previously. For Rampling, much of what she is asked to accomplish must be done with facial expressions and physicality alone, the words she does speak having multiple meanings that go in numerous directions all at once. As for Courtney, Geoff is a man who says what is on his mind right at that given moment, rarely comprehending the emotional hammer descending upon his wife's psyche when he does so. The actor manages a glorious balancing act throughout, never over or underplaying things at any time, thus when heartfelt declarations are called for the moment rings with an eloquent authenticity that filled my heart with joy.

Haigh's Weekend was a thoughtful, life-affirming drama chronicling the early first steps of a burgeoning romantic relationship between two wary men, each falling into the arms of the other as if compelled by lust, never imagining a deeper connection was also forming. With 45 Years, the writer/director chooses to focus on the other end of the spectrum, Kate and Geoff, even though they married young, both well aware they're nearing the end of a run together filled with blissful highs, brutal lows and indescribable in-betweens. Both motion pictures showcase a filmmaker of transcendent depth and maturity, one able to mine emotional interiors that startle and amaze yet also enchant and reassure. His latest isn't just one of the year's best films, it's also an instant classic, a drama of profound majesty sure to be marveled at for many years to come.


Heartfelt Ip Man 3 a triumph for Donnie Yen
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

IP MAN 3
Now playing


You could make a case that actor Donnie Yen is one of the more underappreciated and undervalued actors, not just action stars, to ever come out of Hong Kong. He's left an indelible imprint on a number of motion pictures ranging from Yuen Woo-Ping's Iron Monkey, to Zhang Yimou's Hero, to Tony Ching Siu Tung's The Empress and the Warriors, his martial arts prowess and steely presence never in doubt at any point. But it was arguably his being cast as Hong Kong icon Ip Man, the Wing Chun practitioner who taught Bruce Lee, in the 2008 biopic Ip Man that forced many to recognize his skills as a thespian, the emotive depth and expressive complexity of his performance working in beautiful tandem with his cinematic kung fu expertise.

While the 2010 sequel (Ip Man 2) didn't quite capture the same sort of flair or fire of its predecessor, Yen once again was the film's chief asset, adding a dimensionality to the relatively tired second chapter that kept it out of the realm of irrelevance and still made watching it moderately worthwhile. Now, with the long-in-coming release of Ip Man 3, the same holds true. Yet while Yen is again sensational, returning director Wilson Yip (Flash Point) and his trio of screenwriters have also constructed two other dynamic characters for the third entry in the series. They have finally given talented actress Lynn Hung something important to do as Ip's loving wife Cheung Wing-sing. At the same time they grant their star a complex, emotionally conflicted foil in Sum Nung, a fellow Wing Chung expert and erstwhile teacher, superbly portrayed by Jin Zhang. Together, the trio enliven the sequel, make it akin to a January essential, watching it a breathlessly energetic experience that had my spirits soaring and my heart filling with joy.

Of course, all most are going to want to talk about is the third act face-off between the quietly confident Ip and a brutish American thug named Frank, played with expectedly pugilistic brio by former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson. It's silly stuff, watching the diminutive Yen stand toe-to-toe with Iron Mike, bringing a not-so-surprising chuckle the second the sequence begins. But the clash itself is glorious, spectacularly choreographed by fight director Yuen Woo-Ping, and as cartoonish as the visual image might be, not for a single second is the inherent danger both men are up against as they attempt to smash the other into submission ever in doubt.

Granted, it is the primary plot that Frank is involved in that keeps Ip Man 3 from soaring as high as it maybe could have. It's a comic book clash between Ip and the foreign gangster, who is gamely assisted by his oily Hong Kong surrogate (played with smarmy glee by Patrick Tam), the two disagreeing over the fate of a local neighborhood school the latter wants to see shut down and the former is sworn to protect. This battle of wills allows for a number of complex martial arts battles between Ip, Sum Nung and a number of faceless bad guys, things coming to head in a massive shipyard skirmish with kidnapped kids shouting to be freed as a pair of heroes fight to save them.

Far more interesting is the personal battle Ip's wife Cheung Wing-sing is waging, most of the time without her husband's knowledge, one based in historical fact and inherently having an emotional authority and power to it that's undeniably devastating. Yip and his screenwriters treat this foray into 1950s cancer treatment with remarkable subtlety, allowing Yen and Hung a number of delectate, intimately affecting moments that brought delicate tears to my eyes. More, they earned that response on my part, the final image positively haunting in its stark, heartbreakingly alive poignancy, bringing the trilogy full circle in a way I was suitably moved by.

Also excellent is the relationship between Ip and Sum Nung. I liked how each actor played off of the other, how the filmmakers allowed Zhang to craft a multifaceted persona of a good man trying not to succumb to his own internal darkness as he strives to do what he feels is best as a single father of a young son looking up to him for direction. But as terrific as both actors are from a dramatic standpoint, what the film is building to is a climactic battle between titans, both wanting to prove they are Wing Chung at its absolute best, and here Yip and Woo-Ping do not disappoint. This fight sequence is extraordinary, shot like an eye-popping ballet with both actors gymnastically contorting themselves this way and that to deflect the advances of their equally gifted opponent. It's the type of martial arts moment fans of the genre will go wild for, as spectacular a display of hand-to-hand, adrenaline-fueled magnificence as any I could have hoped for.

The constant, however, remains Yen. Soon to be seen in both Netflix's highly anticipated Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny and next December's Star Wars spinoff Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, Ip Man 3 is a reminder just how talented this international superstar continues to be. His performance is glorious, the actor embodying this martial arts legend with grace, dignity, passion and charisma to burn. As wonderful as many of the other components might be, he remains the number one reason for interested viewers to watch this sequel and continues to be the primary one by which I wholeheartedly recommend they do just that.


Inspiring Hours a fine tale of heroism and survival
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE FINEST HOURS
Now playing


As a massive storm rages up and down the East Coast, the SS Pendleton, bound for Boston, MA, is ripped in two. The first assistant engineer Ray Sybert (Casey Affleck) is stranded aboard the stern of the ship along with 32 other men, all uncertain as to what they should do and understandably fearful they are all about to die. Urged to take command by those who know him best, he puts forth a series of ideas he's all but certain are the only things that could help them manufacture a miracle. However, to pull what he has imagined off, they'll all have to work as a single-minded unit, and considering the deteriorating mental state of a large swath of the survivors the chances of that sit precariously between slim and none.

At the U.S. Coast Guard Station in Chatham, MA, Captain Bernie Webber (Chris Pine) is waiting to hear if Warrant Officer Daniel Cluff (Eric Bana) will give his permission to him to wed local girl Miriam (Holliday Grainger). It's only a formality, but one Bernie feels compelled to follow nonetheless. But everything changes the moment news of the SS Pendleton's situation comes to light. Instead of granting him permission to marry Miriam, Cluff must instead send Bernie into harm's way, ordering him to assemble a crew and to go out and brave the elements to see what they can do to save what's left of the floundering ship's crew.

The Finest Hours, adapted from the best-selling book by Michael J. Tougias and Casey Sherman, is based on a true story of heroism and survival that happened off the coast of New England on February 18, 1952. Director Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl, Fright Night) and his trio of screenwriters aren't exactly subtle in their approach, and there are times the melodramatic schmaltz dial has been turned up higher than necessary, but overall this is a surprisingly effective motion picture, one that hits more right notes than it does hollow ones.

If anything, the story following the plight of Sybert and his fellow SS Pendleton survivors is the more fascinating of the two parallel narratives vying for the audience's attention. Not only is Affleck superb, underplaying his stoic, intelligently-focused character to perfection, but the mechanics of how he and his fellow crewmen go about putting themselves in the best position to survive their ordeal is fascinating. Their ship is split into two pieces, their ability to control the rudder severely compromised. Yet Sybert comes up with a plan that allows them to steer their half of the wreckage, the building suspense as I watched them do it leaving me breathless in captivated awe.

The other side of the scenario, the one that follows Bernie as he and three volunteers make what most think is a suicidal attempt to reach the SS Pendleton, is also good, if not quite up to the same level. While the stuff on their Coast Guard emergency rescue lifeboat is solid - their attempts to get out of the harbor and into the open sea particularly exciting - it's the fact this part of the story is juxtaposed with Miriam worrying about her fiancé that sadly brings it down a notch or two. While Grainger does her best, scenes of her character shouting at Cluff, marching into a blizzard pouting as if she were a petulant child, or coming to grips with what it is her beloved is attempting to do as she stands in the den of a single mother who has looked tragedy in the eye and has somehow managed to put the broken pieces of her life back together all ring hollow. It's maudlin, borderline soapy stuff, adding a layer of saccharine that isn't necessary.

Even so, Pine is wonderful, the actor allowing himself to be so vulnerable, such an open book emotionally, that it only augments his courageousness as he drives his crew to give all they can to do to accomplish what by all accounts should be impossible. While a hero, Bernie is the converse to Pine's other notable role as a captain, he of the surname Kirk who asks his crew to go on a five-year mission to go where no one has gone before, and watching Pine look so befuddled as he attempts to romance the confident, intelligently certain of herself Grainger is a joy.

Another plus is the supporting cast that Gillespie has assembled. On the rescue boat with Pine are Ben Foster, John Magaro and Kyle Gallner, while those aboard the rapidly sinking half of the SS Pendleton with Affleck include Josh Stewart, Abraham Benrubi, John Ortiz and a scene-stealing Graham McTavish. All are wonderful, each becoming an almost invisible part of the ensemble, all making an impression but never so much of one they distract from the central mechanics of the story. More, they all ably support Pine and Affleck, granting them the spotlight, only stepping into it themselves when the script allows them the freedom to do so.

Considering this is based on an actual event, it's never in doubt what is going to happen to either Bernie and his crew or the majority of those praying for survival aboard the SS Pendleton. Same time, the actual rescue itself is depicted flawlessly, Gillespie handling things with kinetic, viscerally cocksure confidence that's undeniable. The balance between human heroics and cinematic wizardry is sublime, the whole thing fitting into the Disney inspirational canon with unforced ease.

It's a pity that the movie doesn't know when to quit, the filmmakers taking things to a sappy conclusion that feels more engineered by a studio test screening than it does artistic intent. The final moments are manufactured and false, designed to illicit tears and nothing more. Thankfully, the stuff that does work in The Finest Hours is so solid, so deliciously crafted, so splendidly acted this obvious climactic misstep isn't near as disastrous as it could have been, the film itself still a rousing tale of sacrifice, ingenuity and heroism I couldn't help but enjoy.


EXPLORING RELATIONSHIPS: Andrew Haigh on 45 Years, Weekend and the genius of Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

45 Years
Now playing


Back on January 13, this year's Academy Award nominations were announced, and one of the most surprising nods came in the Best Actress category, cinema icon and British legend Charlotte Rampling being singled out as Best Actress nominee for her spellbinding, emotionally complex performance in 45 Years. Serendipitously, just a couple of hours later I was scheduled to have a brief phone interview with the film's up-and-coming writer/director Andrew Haigh, and to say he was still riding high from that early morning announcement regarding Rampling would be a rather obvious understatement.

'Such a tragic morning this is,' said Haigh with a hearty laugh. 'So terrible.'

'No. Seriously. It's wonderful. I'm so very pleased. I couldn't be happier. It feels very special. I'm still kind of shocked by it all. I woke up this morning like everyone else to watch the announcement and it was a pretty incredible moment. Even though you knew it was in the discussion, that the talk was out there for Charlotte, the reality of her getting it was something very different. I was so pleased. She's a wonderful actress and a wonderful person. She's done so much for the British film industry and for me personally. I'm just very happy.'



45 Years is the story of a long-married couple, Geoff and Kate Mercer (portrayed by Tom Courtenay and Charlotte Rampling), about to celebrate the anniversary hinted at in the film's title. A few days beforehand, the pair learn incredible, tragic news involving a past girlfriend of the husband's, the effect it has upon him leading the wife down an emotional rollercoaster of her own that takes the woman by complete surprise. It's a simple premise made complex, intimate and profound in large parts thanks to Haigh's delicately precise and magnetically nuanced script, Courtenay and Rampling delivering exquisitely detailed performances under his confident direction.

The movie is based on the acclaimed short story In Another Country written by David Constantine, a piece of fiction the filmmaker found himself enchanted by. 'I love the short story,' he states. 'It's so beautifully written. So concise. So sparse. Yet so really, really effective. You have this body being discovered, beautiful, frozen, perfectly preserved and full of nothing but pure potential. And this discovery has a real profound effect on this relationship, and a really secure, long-term relationship, or one that is seemingly so, all of which is fascinating to me.'

'I like to explore relationships. I like to explore how we understand ourselves through these relationships. I think, this kind of news, it throws this couple off their path, and I love what it does to them, what it makes them question. The possibilities here for rich, dynamic drama just felt so immense, as far as I was concerned.'

Not that putting the various pieces together was all that simple a proposition. Constantine's story was fairly brief and centralized, and Haigh knew he'd have to do a lot of work if he was going to transform this piece of fiction into a feature-length script. 'It's always a bit of trouble to start with,' he admits. 'But I always felt like I had a pretty good handle on it. The story is told from the male perspective, pretty much, and I feel like when I made the decision to change that, to see things through the female perspective, for some reason that kind of opened it up, the story, to so many additional possibilities.'

'I added a few things. The time constraints. The anniversary party. I felt like by giving it that kind of structure and that kind of framework, while also knowing who my point of view was, I think all of that really helped. It allowed me to expand the story and build on the themes in ways I felt were genuine.'

Finding the right actors to play Geoff and Kate was always key, and Haigh understandably felt like he'd just won something akin to the lottery when Courtenay and Rampling agreed to play the roles. 'It was surreal,' Haigh admits. 'They turned these two-dimensional characters into something real; they brought Kate and Geoff to life. The way I like to work, we don't really rehearse, but we go through the scene on that day, sort of walk our way through it. We'll cut some lines that we don't need, we might change things here and there, and overall it's a real collaborative process. I want the actors to feel as if they are embodying the story, embodying the characters in every way, that way we can all work together to get the best out of one another that we can.'

Not that the filmmaker was counting on getting Courtenay or Rampling to play the parts. 'I always like to keep it a question,' Haigh admits. 'I don't like to write with certain actors in mind, because it could both be deeply depressing when they say no and also make it difficult to cast someone else in the part if you've written it too obviously for a certain actor. But you can't help but talk about people, start coming up with ideas as to who might play the parts, and quickly both Charlotte and Tom's names both came up and I was immediately struck by how fascinating a way to go if they were to become involved.'

'It was always very important to me that we cast the female lead first, so we initially went to Charlotte before we approached Tom. She said yes, and she said it very quickly, and her agreeing to play Kate actually allowed us to convince Tom to come aboard as Geoff with far more ease than I anticipated. It was kind of like a dream process. I still can't quite believe how it all worked out, and now I can't imagine anyone else playing either of these two characters. They're both just genius. They are Kate and Geoff.'

One of the more beguiling aspects of the film is the way the presence of Courtenay and Rampling ends up tying 45 Years to past classics of European cinema, motion pictures like The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner and Billy Liar for him, and Georgy Girl and The Damned for her. 'You can't cast people like Tom and Charlotte and not use their past works and an audience's familiarity with them to your advantage,' proclaims Haig. 'I did feel like there was a connection. You look at The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, clearly Tom's character there could have grown up to become Geoff Mercer. When Geoff and Kate are discussing the past, I can picture them as they looked as their younger selves in those films, I can picture Charlotte in Georgy Girl and Tom in Billy Liar, it just feels like their characters could have known one another, could have had a relationship that would end up lasting for over four decades. That's really quite special, as far as I'm concerned.'

'When you're in that moment of working, you don't always know what it is you've got until you get back into editing room and are like, oh, that's really special. Even then, you can't always know until the movie is completed if you've got anything. But with Charlotte and Tom, there were more than a few times where, on the day, you just had to stand back, that you knew these two knew exactly what it was that they were doing. They're both special actors, and the way they both worked together on this was something to witness.'

I'd actually spoken to Haigh once before, back in 2011 when he came to Seattle to debut his magnificent love story Weekend, a beautiful, heartfelt film about two men who meet for a couple days of sex and debauchery and discover their mutual connection might run deeper than they had any reason to imagine it was going to. I remind him about just how honestly shocked he seemed to be with the critical and audience response to the film, about how he appeared so touched and amazed that people were enjoying it as much as they were.

'I think I always feel the same thing,' he says with a laugh. 'I always feel like I'm a little bit of an outsider, so when you make these films, you tell these stories, you tend to be caught off guard when people respond to them. They're both quite strange films, really. It's hard to imagine people wanting to watch a movie about two guys, in Weekend, getting together to have sex and then spend so much of their time talking; I just didn't know whether people were going to see or understand what it was I was trying to do.'

'Same with this story. It's so amazing that people like it, that they do love it, that they're responding to it. I don't take anything for granted. I realize just how special it is that you can make something that touches an audience, compose a film that they can relate to, see some of themselves within. I'm really pleased that 45 Years is working for people.'

With Weekend, Haigh was looking at what could potentially be the start of a lasting relationship. In 45 Years, the director now looks at the other end of a relationship, showcasing two individuals, while not in their final years, are close enough to them to know that their time together is starting to run short. It's both ends of the romantic relationship spectrum, a juxtaposition that, if not implicitly intentional, was one the filmmaker was still keenly aware of.

'I certainly did see them as companion pieces,' he emphatically proclaims. '45 Years is sort of sequel to Weekend, if you will, in some ways. It's as you say. One is a story of two people looking forward at the possibilities at what might be and what that might mean for each of their lives. The other is about a couple looking back, looking at what that relationship has been, looking at how it has defined them and how it has made them who they are. Similar stories, in some ways, but ones that look at things from inverted perspectives.'

And how does the director want audiences to feel as they look at this particular story, what is he hoping they're talking about as they exit the theatre? 'I want them to feel, more than I want them to do anything else,' Haigh admits. 'I want them to feel something. Anything. I want the emotions at the heart of it all to resonate with them. It's so important, these choices that we make, the way we handle relationships, the way we deal with people, and I hope people are thinking about all of that. In a way, this film is about those things we don't talk about, those things we repress, and how they always end up coming out in the end and force you to deal with them. If the film starts a broader conversation, as far as that is concerned, that would be pretty terrific.'




Gay City Arts presents 'LUSH US: Gay City Arts Showcase' with Mary Lambert
------------------------------
Really Really examines digital generation's #WorstNightEver
------------------------------
Whim W'Him presents an intriguing evening of new works
------------------------------
Sting and Peter Gabriel together in Seattle this summer
------------------------------
Bullets Over Broadway, the Musical:
An interview with Jeff Brooks

------------------------------
German television captures a gem
------------------------------
OUTBOUND: Best of Travel 2015 includes our favorite hotels, restaurants, bars, and visitor spots from last year's journeys
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
An open letter on anti-Trans bill SB 6443
------------------------------
Troye Sivan shares his coming out story, favorite American food and musical crushes
------------------------------
45 Years an emotionally rapturous masterpiece
------------------------------
Heartfelt Ip Man 3 a triumph for Donnie Yen
------------------------------
Inspiring Hours a fine tale of heroism and survival
------------------------------
EXPLORING RELATIONSHIPS: Andrew Haigh on 45 Years, Weekend and the genius of Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
Seattle Gay Blog post your own information on
the Seattle Gay Blog
 
 

gay news feeds gay news readers gay rss gay
http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml

Seattle Gay News - SGN
1707 23rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Phone 206-324-4297
Fax 206-322-7188

email: sgn2@sgn.org
website suggestions: web@sgn.org

copyright Seattle Gay News 2015 - DigitalTeamWorks 2015

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News
Pacific Northwest News in Seattle News in Washington State News