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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, September 4, 2015 - Volume 43 Issue 36
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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Lily Tomlin on Grandma and other life experiences
by Gary M. Kramer - SGN Contributing Writer

GRANDMA
Opening in Seattle
September 18


As the title character in Grandma, Lily Tomlin is sensational. The actress/comedian plays Elle, a poet who is in mourning for her partner, Violet. As the film opens, Elle is breaking up with her current girlfriend, Olivia (Judy Greer). Then Elle's granddaughter Sage (Julia Garner) arrives needing $630 for an abortion. Elle and Sage set out on a day-long journey which involves lessons on the feminist movement, tattoos, and fisticuffs.

Tomlin chatted about Grandma and her experiences as a young woman, the feminist movement, tattoos, and getting punched in the face.

Gary M. Kramer: As a teenager, who would you have run to if you got into trouble like Sage did?

Lily Tomlin: I had some adult friends, grown women 10-15 years older than I was. They lived in the apartment building I grew up in. We've stayed friends. One woman is in her 90s now. So I would have gone to one of those women. I had a quality about me - an air of independence - that made me seem probably older than I was. I would babysit their children though I wasn't much older than their kids. One of the points in Grandma is that there is a generation that does not understand - or perhaps does not want to understand - the difficulties women and LGBT people have faced in the recent past. I'm sad the younger generation doesn't know many people in the women's movement particularly. There is more effort in the Gay community about celebrating its heroes, like Harvey Milk.

Gary M. Kramer: You have rarely played openly Gay characters on screen? Was there a reason for that?

Lily Tomlin: In Tea with Mussolini I played an archeologist, but not much was made of her Lesbianism. I did try to get the Cher part in Silkwood. Nora Ephron had called me and wanted me to have the part, but Mike Nichols wasn't inclined towards me. I was never really offered anything. There weren't that many Lesbian parts out there.

Gary M. Kramer: How did you find a way to create Elle so that she wasn't 'Lily Tomlin'?

Lily Tomlin: I didn't struggle to create a character. I didn't have to wear a wig or anything, like I have to in big studio movies to identify the characters' culture or type. It was my own hair, makeup, clothes, and car. I think Elle was just well created; the script was so fluid and so perfect. It is like Grace and Frankie.

Gary M. Kramer: Elle ends a relationship with Olivia, brushing aside her lover's feelings, masking her own pain and pride. How do you see her character?

Lily Tomlin: Olivia just wants something Elle can't give her at that point in her life. Elle's still grieving from Violet's death, and turning away from that is a kind of betrayal. So she seizes the break up in her own defense. When you have a long-term relationship it takes a while to get over it. So if Olivia can't take Elle on her own terms, she needs to split.

Gary M. Kramer: Speaking of long-term relationships, how is married life?

Lily Tomlin: Very sweet. We've been together a long time. We weren't going to get married. We used to say we weren't interested in imitating heterosexuals. But so many people asked us, so we decided: let's get married. And we did on New Year's Eve, 2013. We were glad that it has come to pass.

Gary M. Kramer: Do you have any tattoos, like Elle does?

Lily Tomlin: [Laughs]. I don't like tattoos, but I like to look at them on other people. I wouldn't want to have a tattoo myself. I have played a lot of characters with tattoos. I had a butterfly in Flirting with Disaster and one in Admission.

Gary M. Kramer: What about giving and getting a punch as Elle does? Have you had any notable altercations?

Lily Tomlin: I once had a guy punch me in the face in a bar. It was years and years ago. I'm a mouthy person. I've mellowed somewhat. But at the time, I put a dollar in a jukebox in a bar in the Lower East Side of New York, and this punky guy from the neighborhood came in. It was a dive bar, where some low-grade mobsters might come in at the end of the night. And this guy comes in and tells someone to unplug the jukebox. When the guy came over to unplug the jukebox, he looked over at me, and asked if I minded. I said I did; I had money in it. And the punky guy came over and roughed my shoulders and said, 'You don't mind. Do you?!' And I threw a glass of water in his face. He gave me a black eye. I cried for days I was so horrified, and trespassed.

Gary M. Kramer: WOW! What was your relationship with your mother and your grandmother like?

Lily Tomlin: I was close to my mother and grandmother. My grandmother died in the 1980s. She had a lively personality. She was sweet and docile. My mother, who died ten years ago, was very witty and kind and everybody loved her. She was never ridiculing or sarcastic - very upbeat. I wouldn't have gone to her with anything like Sage does; I would have taken care of it myself, or gone to my friend who was a mature woman.

© 2015 Gary M. Kramer


Cinerama Fan Film Series:
An interview with Cinerama's Greg Wood
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

CINERAMA FAN FILM SERIES
September 7-17


Today begins one of the more unique, and dare I say unprecedented, film festivals in Seattle's rich, lush and esoteric cinematic history. The Cinerama stages what it is proudly calling a 'Fan Film Series,' 45 motion pictures spanning seven-plus decades screening over the next two weeks, all determined by an Internet vote done through the theatre's website.

'It was my idea,' laughs Cinerama Director of Operations Greg Wood, 'I honestly had no idea if we could pull it off. We sort of just sprung it up on the website. There was no guarantee people would end up voting in the numbers they did. This festival seems to have generated quite a lot of excitement. Here's hoping they all buy tickets.'

The films being showcased are an incredible hodgepodge of differing genres and subject matters. The Hunt for Red October and On the Waterfront, The Wizard of Oz and My Neighbor Totoro, No Country for Old Men and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Inception and Akira, Moulin Rouge! and The Sound of Music, these are only a small sampling of the motion pictures chosen by the popular vote. 'It really wasn't a surprise that Blade Runner ended up as the number one vote-getter,' says Wood. 'It's been a long time since Warner Bros has allowed the film to be screened. I had a suspicion it would come out on top. I was actually more surprised by how close everything was. The finished list was always in doubt up until the last minute of voting. I was amazed how close number two through fifty in the end finally were.'

And that included films not originally on the ballot. While over a 100 motion pictures were listed on the website to choose from, there was also a selection for 'fan favorites' that allowed for write-in picks, and in this case a few of those accumulated enough votes to screen during the festival. 'Raiders of the Lost Ark and The Big Lebowski were overwhelming fan favorites,' states Wood. 'It was apparent early on we were going to have to make room for both. But there were a few others that garnered a number of votes that we decided against adding to the festival.'

And why is that? 'We have our reasons,' he says with a grin. 'You'll notice there is no 70mm, there isn't a bulk of sci-fi, because we have some things in place for next year that audiences will hopefully be excited about. This [Fan Film Series] was more of an excuse to program a bunch of random stuff you more than likely wouldn't get the chance to see at the Cinerama probably. But, next year, we've got things in the pipeline where we'll be able to showcase a bunch of titles people were asking about.'

What I think I personally love about this festival is that it clearly showcases Seattle's unabashed love for cinema of all types, the fact Citizen Kane and Casablanca were two of the top picks alongside the likes of Akira and Big Trouble in Little China tickling my heart to no-end. 'Die Hard surprised me,' admits Wood candidly. 'I didn't see that doing so well. There were a lot of votes for Die Hard. I expect we're going to end up with a pretty raucous crowd for that one.'

'But, there were a lot of titles we clearly didn't put on the ballot on purpose,' he adds casually. 'Lawrence of Arabia wasn't on the list mainly because we show it so often, but there were so many write-ins for it we felt like adding a screening was the right thing to do. But there were a lot of other Cinerama movies we purposely left off, like How the West Was Won. And, I mean, I almost refuse at this point to show 2001: A Space Odyssey unless we're showing it in 70mm and we knew we weren't going to do any 70mm for this festival. Even though it was an audience vote, we still had a game plan in regards to scheduling; I like to think we knew what we were doing.'

'It's a weird time of year to schedule a film festival, honestly. We didn't really want to do the sci-fi festival again right now as it's really kind of a dead time of year, so many people out of town or doing other things right at the start of September. But we also didn't have anything we wanted to schedule as a first-run title, as it's just as dead a time period for the industry, these first two weeks of the month. This felt like a good way to engage our customers and get them excited about something. It's just a fun idea.'

As far as fun ideas go, part of trying to keep things exciting and atypical at the theatre, the Cinerama just completed its first ever 'Summer Rewind,' a quirky selection of films given a single day's showcase (the lone exception being Pixar's Inside Out, garnering a single matinee screening each day of the week) ranging from popular box office hits (Jurassic World) to under-the-radar critical darlings (Dope). 'I knew we had three weeks to get through before we were scheduled to show Everest,' explains Wood. 'We talked about bringing back Mad Max: Fury Road for another week. We talked about finding something else that could play for a week to happy audiences. It suddenly struck us to do something similar to what we did in regards to the Academy Awards earlier this year, show a single movie a day that we felt deserved another look.'

'It allowed us to bring in things that we knew would do really well like Mad Max and Jurassic World while at the same time showcasing films we felt audiences might have initially passed on, like Dope and Magic Mike XXL. It allowed us to show a hit comedy like Trainwreck, which isn't normally the kind of film we get to show at the Cinerama, as well as Southpaw, a movie a lot of people were talking about but for whatever reason didn't go and see. It was just a lot of fun to program.'

As for overall conditions and the continuing health of the theatre itself, Wood couldn't be happier. 'Ever since the renovation we've been on a really, really good pace,' he proudly states. 'Things have been going exceedingly well. We're heavily dependent on quality of content, the movies themselves, and for the most part the titles we've showcased have garnered a strong response from our customer base. But, we also have great relations with the studios. No other theatre in the country was allowed to show Avengers: Age of Ultron for only two weeks; we were, which allowed us to program Mad Max: Fury Road for a week.'

'I actually have a feeling Mad Max: Fury Road is going to be one of those movies that goes down like 2001 or Lawrence of Arabia, that it's going to become one of those Cinerama staples Seattle audiences are always eager to see,' posits Wood. 'The response from people to that film, how excited they get, it's almost beyond belief.'

As for the new releases set to play the theatre through the end of the year, Wood's enthusiasm is clear. 'The slate coming up is pretty terrific,' he states. 'Everest, The Martian, the new James Bond film [Spectre], Star Wars, I think that lineup speaks for itself. We're excited, no question.'



As to that latter title, I can't help but try to find out if Wood and his team has anything special planned in regards to The Force returning to the Cinerama. 'Yes, yes, I'm sure people would want to know about that,' he chuckles. 'It's rather frustrating, actually. I'd love to tell you what's going to be happening in December when that film is released, but we just have to wait for good old Disney to let us all know what it is they're planning on doing. Once they do that, then we can start revealing what we think we're going to do in regards to the return of Star Wars to the Cinerama.'

Switching back to current events, with 45 films to choose from, I ask Wood what five he would choose to see, the caveat being he could only choose films unlikely to screen at the theatre again for quite some time, if ever. 'Oh, man,' he laughs. 'Way to put me on the spot.'

Thinking for a moment, he answers, 'Well, Blade Runner, without question. We haven't been able to have that at the Cinerama in such a long time. You just need to see that one there. I would also go with Blue Velvet, that's going to be extraordinary. I'd also see Chinatown, definitely. I'm not sure it's a 'top five' kind of movie but The Last of the Mohicans is amazing at the Cinerama. I think I'd have to throw that in there; I just love that movie. And I guess I would say Raiders of the Lost Ark. We'll probably get it back again at some point, but it's still Raiders. You can't go wrong with Raiders of the Lost Ark.'

As for the overall vote, ruminating once again on the idea that Seattle voters chose motion pictures like The Sting, The Godfather, The Big Lebowski, Almost Famous, Labyrinth, Donnie Darko, Fight Club, Top Gun, Ghostbusters and Forrest Gump to all play alongside one another, when one steps back and takes it all in the diversity and eclecticism of the lineup can't help but impress. 'It just sums up the love for the Cinerama, don't you think?' asks Wood. 'It's just such an awesome place to see anything. Who wouldn't want to go see a Harry Potter movie [Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban] and Citizen Kane at the same venue? I certainly would, and it's apparent Seattle audiences must feel the same because that's what they voted for.'


Latest Hitman assassinates entertainment
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

HITMAN: AGENT 47
Now playingb

As video game adaptations go, Hitman: Agent 47 is better than 2007's Hitman, the last time anyone had the bright idea to try and bring this particularly violent shoot-'em-up to the big screen. But, considering that debacle was one of the worst efforts the genre has ever offered up, and, yes, I've seen Doom, Double Dragon, Wing Commander, House of the Dead, BloodRayne, DOA: Dead or Alive, Postal and In the Name of the King: A Dungeon Siege Tale, this isn't saying a lot. In fact, it's actually saying less than that, because even though it's a more well thought out, visually interesting action effort than its predecessor that still doesn't make it any good. In fact, it actually makes the sequel one of 2015's most difficult to sit through wastes of time.

Skip Woods, who not only wrote the first one but also had a hand in such wretched spectacles like A Good Day to Die Hard, X-Men Origins: Wolverine and Swordfish, teams up with fellow screenwriter Michael Finch (Predators) to craft the script for this one, and results are not good. Apparently, the best the pair can come up with is to liberally crib from both The Terminator and Terminator 2: Judgment Day (not to mention any of the many Resident Evil sequels), a mad dash of Halloween and The Bourne Identity thrown in for good measure. It's a mess, on some levels a spectacular one, a statement that in any way whatsoever should be construed as a reason to give the film a look.

Katia (Hannah Ware) is the long-lost daughter of the missing scientist (Ciarán Hinds) who originally started the program that transformed countless youngsters into cold-blooded killing machines like the unstoppable Agent 47 (Rupert Friend). He's been tasked by a shadowy organization to keep her from finding dear old dad, mainly because the CEO (Thomas Kretschmann) of a monolithic corporation is intent on getting their hands on him in order to restart the Agent program for reasons too devious and dastardly to allow. Keeping Agent 47 at bay is John Smith (Zachary Quinto), Katia allowing herself to be put into his hands as the lethal assassin chasing them stops at nothing to fulfill his contract.

What follows are a series of shootouts, fist fights, car crashes and near escapes as truths become lies, secrets are revealed and a whole lot of scientific gobbledygook is blurted out as if viewers are actually meant to make heads or tails out of any of it. Director Aleksander Bach stages a couple of decent moments, I can't deny that, an escape from what looks like an airplane engine factory suitably violent and grotesque. But he's also just as apt to let himself become beholden to tired modern action film tropes. There's too much horribly obvious CGI, too much shaky-cam and Michael Bay-inspired quick-cutting that devolves fight scenes into visually incoherent blurs. Worst of all, the abundance of shots showcasing Agent 47 walking in obnoxiously ludicrous slow-motion, all of which would be unintentionally hysterical if they weren't so gosh-darn ponderous.

Okay. So the movie's terrible. I guess this shouldn't come as anything close to resembling a surprise. But part of me is a tiny bit angry that I didn't want it to be, that I want to allow myself to imagine that a low rent video game adaptation such as this could have bucked the trend and been worthwhile. Same time, after all these years, after so many bad movies and disappointing misfires, I still like to be the critic who feels any movie, any movie at all, could potentially be awesome. Hitman: Agent 47 is the type of disaster that can kill those sort of aspirations, this lethal killing machine nothing more than a dream assassin making it the most heinous type of misfire there possibly is.


Machine attempts to separate the myth from the man
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

STEVE JOBS:
THE MAN IN THE MACHINE
Now playing


Early on in Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine, the late Apple cofounder's ex-girlfriend Chrisann Brennan mentions that her former boyfriend had a great deal of difficulty connecting with people on an individual, intimate level, the great irony of course being he ended up connecting just about everyone through his company's machines. It's a great, almost brilliant observation, and one which Oscar-winning documentarian Alex Gibney (Taxi to the Dark Side, Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief) revolves much of his latest film around. It's your basic this-was-someone's-life retrospective, the veteran filmmaker keeping things linear and straightforward as he looks at the highs, lows and numerous in-betweens that made up Jobs' undeniably influential life.

For Apple junkies, this is likely to come across as a hit piece. Gibney chooses to take off the rose-colored glasses, show the flaws and the brilliance, attempting to find the wizard behind the curtain, giving a broader insight into a human being so many have tended to look at in awe and with reverence but seldom with understanding. For someone who is not an iPhone, iMac, iPod, iPad or Macintosh groupie, for my part I felt the balance between objectivity and admiration is fairly well struck, and I felt that by the end I knew Jobs quite a bit better than I did before the motion picture had started.

But is it essential? That's the question I can't seem to decide whether or not I'm capable of answering. While Apple wasn't involved with the production, I can't say it hurts that they were not. The fact the whole thing is assembled more as a stationary, somewhat static talking heads piece, one filled to the brim with those who knew Jobs best, that's neither a positive nor a negative, either. Instead, this is just another aspect to the film that keeps it moderately fascinating and tiredly traditional, showcasing both traits at the exact same time throughout.

The best bits involve listening to Jobs compatriots like Steve Wozniak (who still can't believe his friend swindled him out of roughly 90 percent of the profits from the pair's celebrated Atari game Breakout), Bob Belleville, Daniel Kottke and Andy Grignon, each having their own tales to tell in regards to their compatriot's Machiavellian-like talent for manipulation. There's the story of Jobs' teenage girlfriend getting pregnant and his anger at having to pay $500 a month in child support. Then there are those reporters who ended up with an iPhone 4 before they were supposed to, the behind-the-scenes maneuvering of law enforcement to put them in their place disturbingly improper (to put it lightly).

The thing is, none of this lessens the impressiveness of Jobs' overall vision and his obsession to see it realized. There's a reason Apple is where it is today (and why, again, the company wanted no part in Gibney's documentary), and a large reason for this is because its CEO wasn't the patron saint of benevolent tech so many would blindly like to believe. On that level, I do think Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine is a fair portrait of one of the great thinkers, tinkerers and craftsman of modern times, I'm just not entirely sure that fact in and of itself makes the documentary required viewing.


We Are Your Friends an energetic music-driven cliché
by Sara Michelle Fetters SGN A&E Writer WE ARE YOUR FRIENDS Now playing Cole Carter (Zac Efron) and his best friends Mason (Jonny Weston), Ollie (Shiloh Fernandez) and Squirrel (Alex Shaffer) don't live in Hollywood, but by being in the San Fernando Valley right next door they're all close enough to allow themselves to have dreams of stardom and fame they know deep down probably will not come true. They go through their days, subsisting as best they can, partying and playing from sundown to sunup, making pacts to stick together no matter what the future holds. Cole is the most talented member of the foursome. He's a DJ, an EDM (Electronic Dance Music) fanatic who plays his music every Thursday night a local Hollywood club. For some unknown reason having nothing to do with music, veteran superstar James Reed (Wes Bentley) finds himself taking a liking to the kid, introducing him to his world, and to his live-in girlfriend and assistant Sophie (Emily Ratajkowski), with nonchalant friendliness. Things are looking up for Cole, and as long as he can keep his head straight and find the inspiration to create that one killer track that will get everyone dancing the sky's the limit as to where he'll go from here. There's not a lot to director Max Joseph's We Are Your Friends. Working from a story by Richard Silverman, co-writing the script with Meaghan Oppenheimer, the man behind MTV's "Catfish: The TV Show" hasn't exactly come up with a coming-of-age looking-to-find-stardom scenario anyone, anywhere likely hasn't seen before. It's A Star is Born for the Under the Electric Sky generation, a hallucinogenic sojourn into electronic dance music craziness given a Millennial twist if only in somewhat patronizing fashion. Be that as it may, Joseph's debut isn't a waste of time, mostly because Efron is terrific in the central role and Bentley comes close to matching him as the drunken, downtrodden music superstar reveling in past glories unable to come up with anything new. There's also a manic energy to the motion picture, especially early on, that hints at the devil-may-care saga of excess and inspiration that all of this potentially might have been, an early sequence of Cole tripping out on PCP having a Ralph Bakshi meets James Toback vibe that's exhilarating. Yet, make no mistake, the filmmaker slathers on the melodrama all-too thickly. The fractured bromance of the central quartet goes exactly where you think it will, Cole's making goo-goo-eyes at Sophie has the expected repercussions and a third act tragedy is so inelegantly crammed into the proceedings it's almost offensive. A subplot concerning a seedy real estate broker (smarmily plated by Jon Bernthal) adds virtually nothing save setting up a mid-credits coda engineered solely to tug at a few heartstrings, while the climactic concert sequence isn't anywhere near as inspiring as it needs to be. Clichés run rampant throughout and while some of the supporting performances make up for this (most notably Weston's, who's catastrophically ferocious as the group's live-in-the-now ringleader), others sadly do not (Ratajkowski, in particular, fails to rise to the occasion, making her part in a budding love triangle oddly forgettable). At the very least, the movie looks and sounds terrific. Stunningly shot by Brett Pawlak (Short Term 12) and edited with a manic intensity by Terel Gibson (The D Train) and David Diliberto (No Country for Old Men) that fits the proceedings perfectly, the real standout element is the picture's sound design, the sonic atmosphere augmenting the on-screen drama nicely. I also like the fact that, for as familiar as all of this might be, as lacking in any real surprises as it is, the film is never boring, Joseph doing a fine job keeping the pace hopping and the pulse racing as he moves all his characters to their preordained place on the EDM chessboard. It's a backhanded compliment stating that We Are Your Friends isn't half bad, yet I find that's about the best statement I can come up with to encapsulate my feelings towards the music-driven drama. Efron continues to grow as an actor, while Bentley has rebounded nicely these past few years becoming a solid character actor after washing out as a supposed "next big thing" after American Beauty came out back in 1999. If only the script that Joseph and company came up with wasn't so blandly melodramatic, so prone to lapsing into tired cliché, then maybe this could have been something of a rejuvenating surprise. As it is, the movie isn't without its merits; there's just not enough of them to make seeing it at the theater worthy of the ticket price.


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Reflections on the county clerk in Kentucky
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Audra McDonald books Tacoma concert this fall
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Lily Tomlin on Grandma and other life experiences
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Cinerama Fan Film Series:
An interview with Cinerama's Greg Wood

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Latest Hitman assassinates entertainment
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Machine attempts to separate the myth from the man
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