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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, December 12, 2014 - Volume 42 Issue 50
Honoring Lou Ellen Couch, street-tough and soulful fallen friend
Section One
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Honoring Lou Ellen Couch, street-tough and soulful fallen friend

by Shaun Knittel - SGN Associate Editor

Today, at 3 p.m., author Justin Reed Early, her brother Frankie and friends will honor unsung LGBT hero, Lou Ellen 'Lou Lou' Couch on the 29th anniversary of her death, with a new headstone to be unveiled at her grave at Evergreen-Washelli Cemetery (11111 Aurora Ave. N.) Section 10, Plot 3.

'By remembering my lost friend Lou Lou, I hope to make people pay more attention to homeless LGBT youth,' said Justin Reed Early, who authored the book Street Child: A Memoir, adding, 'I want to cultivate hope and bring new life to my childhood friends as well as other LGBT youth on the street.'

Street Child: A Memoir details Justin Reed Early's harrowing experiences as a homeless Gay youth on the streets of Seattle and San Francisco in the 1980s and explains how he survived the dire circumstances to become a leading advocate on the issue of LGBT youth homelessness. The children portrayed are real and the stories are authentic. Early provides books at no cost to at-risk and homeless children in crisis.

'Lou Lou is an unsung, massive LGBT hero,' said Justin Reed Early. 'She died very young after living a very 'out' and authentic life - always protecting others, especially if they were vulnerable.'

According to Early, Lou Lou was 'strong, protective, loved, and sometimes hated. She looked like a guy, fought like a man, with fists of steel that were used frequently on street thugs who often preyed on our more vulnerable street family members.'

'She was bold, brave, butch, and beauteous as well as misunderstood and physically scarred all over her body and deep into her crazy soul,' said Early. 'Her loyalty, humor, and zest for life somehow always outshone her demons and masculine protective energy.'

'Men often made the mistake of crossing her because they wanted her to submit into her 'womanly' place, but she never once backed down and rarely did she lose a battle - in fact, I know of only one battle she would ever lose, and it was her last,' Early recalled.

'In 1985, on a very cold and rainy December night in downtown Seattle, while enduring the hatred that was so freely thrown her way, she left us,' he continued. 'While she was standing up to the men who were taunting her and her girlfriend, one of them pushed a knife into her chest, piercing her tender heart. She died moments later, leaving nothing of monetary value behind, but leaving thousands of broken hearts and a heroic legacy - a legacy that sadly, too few know about to this day.'

Lou Lou was also a star in the way that she was one of the main characters in the film documentary Streetwise (by Martin Bell and Mary Ellen Mark). In other words, her likeness has been seen by millions, enamored by her authenticity and bravado, never really knowing who she was outside of the film. The film was an instantaneous cult hit and nominated for an Academy Award in 1984. However, the Oscar went to a film The Times of Harvey Milk, a better-known LGBT hero, who had been assassinated just a few years prior.

According to Early, 'Lou Lou was never rich or educated. She grew up in the projects in South Seattle with her siblings, including her youngest biracial brother.'

Lou Lou introduced Frankie, her brother, to Early when he was just 10 years old and living on the streets.

'They would both change my world and live in my heart forever,' he said. 'Their family would often take me in for a night and feed me with very limited resources. They were very poor, and although the creators of the movie were kind enough to provide a casket for her burial, no one had the resources for a headstone. As time moved forward no one seemed to remember.'

'I remembered and so did Frankie,' said Early.

'I'll never forget Lou Lou because she was the first person to help me begin to accept my beautiful, intimate, intelligent LGBT design and the strong feelings of 'first love' that I had so long ago with her brother,' he said. 'Even after she left, I remembered her coaching me and empowering me to be the greatest me, reinforcing a tiny light of remaining hope left inside me, most of which had been dimmed by the pain of the streets and a broken juvenile and criminal justice system.'

Early describes the system that contained 'infrastructure that never seemed to care what happened to me, even when sleeping in one of the jail cells that seem to be built faster and more profitably than any housing developments in America.'

'Not many from that long-ago life made it off the streets and out of the 'system.' Fortunately, Frankie and I were able to write new stories, which preclude anything that involves the old ways. We remain friends and extremely blessed contributing members of American society,' he said.

Though Early moved away from the Pacific Northwest, he says that when he often goes back to visit with family and sometimes Frankie, he also visits 'his sister' Lou Lou. 'Sometimes I spend an hour or more digging my fingers into the dirt looking for her little 4-by-6-inch piece of cement with the initials 'LEC' and a plot number; both have worn away over the years.'

'Now I won't have to look that hard,' said Early. 'After many years of discussion, sometimes bumping heads, Frankie will finally be able to place a headstone on his fallen sister's grave. On December 12, Frankie and I, along with Lou Lou's surviving girlfriend, Jenny, and a few other close friends and family, will gather at her grave and celebrate her life, a life that was far too short, but one that made a huge impact.'

'It's been 29 years since our friend and sister was brutally murdered in a street life that seems so many worlds away from our present, healthy lives - but we have never forgotten her,' said Early. 'Though she is gone, her life and death were not in vain. Her love, light, and lessons live on in my book Street Child: A Memoir, where she has been brought back to life and continues to educate, inspire and empower people who struggle into better lives.'

'RIP, dear friend,' Early said. 'We love and miss you.'

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