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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, May 30 2014 - Volume 42 Issue 22
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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Western comedy A Million Ways fires too many blanks
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST


Albert Stark (Seth MacFarlane) is a sheep farmer barely squeaking by in the Arizona frontier town of Old Stump. After fast-talking his way out of a main street gunfight, his longtime girlfriend Louise (Amanda Seyfried) unceremoniously breaks up with him for being a coward, taking up with the local mustachery merchant Foy (Neil Patrick Harris) instead. Things are looking down, and with so many ways to get killed in the Old West, dying from a broken heart is as good a way as any to get yourself laid six feet beneath the cold, hard ground.

Everything changes when Anna (Charlize Theron) gallops into town. Beautiful, smart and handy with a six-gun, for whatever reason she's taken with Albert, and wants to see him discover the confident and decisive person lurking within. She even convinces him to enter into a gunfight with the flippant Foy, certain that with her expert tutelage he'll be able to hold his own and show everyone just what kind of man he truly is.

But Anna has a secret, a truth she's afraid to admit to anyone, just on the off chance the knowledge will get them killed. See, she's the wife of notorious outlaw and gunslinger, Clinch Leatherwood (Liam Neeson), and no amount of training and practice will ever make a guy, like the good-hearted Albert, ready to stand face-to-face with the bloodthirsty likes of him.

Directed and co-written by MacFarlane, A Million Ways to Die in the West isn't so much this generation's attempt to recall the glory days of Mel Brooks' immortal Blazing Saddles as it is an homage to the riches of Hollywood's Western tradition. The Ted filmmaker's second theatrical effort has more in common with 1945's Gary Cooper classic Along Came Jones than it does with that talking teddy bear comedy or with his still popular animated television series 'Family Guy,' the film a story-driven sagebrush saga sprinkled with outlandish comedic bits instead of a laugh-filled, anything-goes free-for-all.

All of which is well and good, especially early on, MacFarlane developing his characters and the world they inhabit nicely. There are deft bits of inspiration pulled from the works of Howard Hawks, John Ford, John Sturges and Anthony Mann, the glory days of John Wayne, James Stewart and the aforementioned Cooper, along with so many others hinted at throughout. Stark is a sublime everyman, and even though his worldly point of view is admittedly far too contemporary in nature, the way he looks at things and reacts to what's occurring fits in nicely with the late 19th century frontier domain MacFarlane has constructed.

Problem is, the movie just isn't very funny. Sure there are chuckles here and there, some of the left field unexpected stuff particularly so at times, but overall as a comedy the movie just doesn't have much in the way of heat, little that keeps momentum percolating. And, it's horribly paced, MacFarlane losing his way on numerous occasions, allowing scenes to go on for an almost interminable length, forcing the mind to wander in directions it otherwise shouldn't be going in. The climactic section, when Clinch learns of Albert's existence and Anna's affection for him, takes forever to play out, ultimately culminating with a humdrum lackadaisical flourish that's as forgettable as it is benign.

It does not help that MacFarlane often loses sight of just what type of story it is he's trying to tell. He spends so much time building the unbreakable friendship between Albert and Edward (Giovanni Ribisi), the town's sexually clueless shoe repairman (who happens to be married to the town's most popular whore, Ruth (Sarah Silverman)), to only forget about the it for long portions of the narrative. As for Louise and Foy, they're barely interesting, almost an invisible part of the proceedings, MacFarlane wasting both Seyfried and especially Harris, doing little of note with either of them, save a sequence of extreme flatulence (a notable node to Blazing Saddles) that's more disgusting than it is hysterical.

His ace in the hole, however, is Theron. She's a sparkling gem in a sea of triviality, bringing life and heart to a film that barely flirts with either property. The Oscar-winning actress is fully invested, finding depth and shadings within Anna, all of which make her an almost perfect Western heroine. She finds humor in the simplest things, beauty at the oddest of moments, painting a three-dimensional portrait easy to relate to and even simpler to get excited about.

More than this, though, I truly do appreciate MacFarlane's obvious affinity and passion for the Western genre. He uses his locations splendidly, allowing cinematographer Michael Barrett's (About Last Night) camera to mine for every detail and revel in every rock formation and canyon. Joel McNeely's (Holes) rollicking score is a flawless mixture of themes and ideas from notable classics ranging from How the West Was Won, to The Magnificent Seven, to Silverado, every note adding just the right gradation to whatever is taking place upon the screen.

Make no mistake, however; none of these positives add up to near enough, A Million Ways to Die in the West a misbegotten, unfocused attempt at Western comedy that never gels like it potentially could have. I appreciate MacFarlane's attempts to broaden his horizons, to step outside his comfort zone, if only just a tiny bit; but unfortunately, that isn't enough to make his latest a success. It misses the mark, shooting way too many blanks, hitting the target so infrequently, it's almost as if the film itself isn't even trying.


Although Angelina Jolie is perfect, the reimagined Maleficent lacks magic
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

MALEFICENT
Now playing

Let me get this out of the way right upfront: Disney's 1959 version of Sleeping Beauty is my all-time favorite animated film. I adore it beyond measure, find it a sweeping testament to love, sacrifice and courage that sweeps me off my feet, and holds me in spellbound awe each and every viewing. It is, to my mind, perfection, and it is the bell standard to which I hold every single animated motion picture that any studio (not just Disney) releases for my cinematic consumption.

So it goes without saying, the bar Maleficent, a live action reinterpretation of my fairy tale favorite, had to vault over for me to give it a pass was going to be fairly high. Fairly or unfairly, and some would understandably lean towards thinking the latter, my judgment of the film was going to be - is going to be - clouded by my unabashed adoration of the animated classic, and for that I feel contentedly unapologetic in the absolute extreme.

All the same, I feel quite strongly that my assessment of the finished film isn't as clouded or as biased as it potentially could have been. The simple truth is that as beautiful as Maleficent is to look at, and considering it is directed by Academy Award-winning visual effects maestro Robert Stromberg (Avatar, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World) this is hardly a surprise, it is unfortunately an emotionally flat effort that feels cribbed together from a variety of superior sources. Its characters are noticeably nondescript, the motivations driving them not particularly interesting, everything building to a loud, obnoxiously energetic conclusion that undercuts the narrative's own themes at seemingly every single turn.

There is an exception to all of this, and thankfully it is a big one. Angelina Jolie, perfect casting in theory, even better in actual execution, inhabits the visage of Disney's most timeless and popular screen villain with remarkable authority. She gives her shadings and complexities that are consistently intriguing, doing so much with just the raise of an eyebrow and the subtle beginnings of a smile, watching her come to life is oftentimes an outright joy. She reinvigorates a cold, lifeless heart with rousing authenticity, reinterpreting the character in ways that feel earthy, genuine and delicate, while also not shirking from the devastatingly visceral power and ferocity lurking inside.

Other than that? Sadly, Stromberg's film is a major missed opportunity on almost all fronts. Creating a world where two kingdoms sit side-by-side - one human, filled with power-mad hellions eager to increase their domain's wealth and power; the other magical, inhabited by innocent, child-like fairies, sprites and various other creatures who only want to live in peace - Linda Woolverton's (Alice in Wonderland, The Lion King) script posits Maleficent to be nothing more than a powerful being undone by her love for a human, and who only wants to see her land remain free from his species' touch. She puts her curse on the infant Princess Aurora, not because she's evil, but because she's heartbroken, wanting to get back at the newly installed King Stefan (Sharlto Copley) for the unforgivable wrongs she feels have been done to her.

From that point, Maleficent sits and watches Aurora grow up into a loving, free-spirited and entirely selfless teenage girl (played by Elle Fanning), quickly coming to the realization her horrifying curse was made in terribly short-sighted haste. Problem is, all this stuff, while pretty to look at, while well-intentioned, isn't particularly interesting, everything happening with a perfunctory blasé specificity that's more specious and dull than it is anything else. And while the main conclusion things build towards is laudable in its female-empowered, emotionally-driven tenacity (think Frozen), these moments of forgiveness and reconciliation are immediately demeaned by the fiery, action-driven pyrotechnics that immediate come right after them.

I feel like I see how Maleficent could have worked. While I can't say I needed or wanted Disney's greatest screen villain to be reinterpreted, giving her a backstory in order to 'explain' her evil ways hardly a necessity, I do admit to being taken in by what it is Stromberg and Woolverton initially set out to do. Had they embraced their ideas completely, had they followed through on them all the way until the end, and not felt compelled to engage in carnage and chaos, potentially there could have been something worthwhile to be talking about. But the movie refuses to do that, doesn't allow for its ideas of forgiveness, reconciliation, selflessness and love to come out in ways that could ultimately matter. It ultimately lacks magic, and even with eyes clouded by my adoration of Disney's 1959 animated marvel, this is one fault I would have found impossible to miss no matter what.


SIFF Film Synopses & Recommendations
by Herb Krohn - SGN A&E Writer

[EDITOR'S NOTE: Films listed without dates have already been screened.]

FASTEN YOUR SEATBELTS
Italy
Rating: EXCELLENT
Genre: Romance

A young woman falls in love with a macho heterosexist motorbike mechanic eventually marrying him. Her best friend is a Gay man who she goes into business with, turning an abandoned building into a thriving bar and restaurant. After having two children, she learns she has cancer and that her husband has been cheating on her for some time. Then the film goes back in time to fill in the blanks, including how and why she and her closest friend came to be friends, as well as her love affair with her husband, and how it actually happened. This film has very high quality production values and strong performances and character development, so the audience forms an emotional connection to the characters. Let's hope this one comes back to screen here again soon.

FIFI HOWLS FROM HAPPINESS
Iran-USA-Italy
Rating: EXCELLENT
Genre: Bio-Documentary

This is a fascinating profile of Gay Iranian artist, Bahman Mohasses, who was one of the most respected artists during the time of the Shah. Completely disappeared and believed deceased, he was found living in Italy. The film consists of actual interviews with this remarkable Gay artist, he expounds in depth on his philosophy of art, culture, and his own works, many of which he himself saw destroyed. His perceptions of contemporary Gay life are a reflection of a long bygone era, and his recognition and acceptance of his own mortality are simply realistic.

THE FOXY MERKINS
USA
Rating: BOMB
Genre: Comedy-Farce

An unattractive overweight young woman goes to NYC to become a Lesbian prostitute. She befriends another Lesbian prostitute who attempts to show her the ways of the trade. They sleep under plastic tarps in the bathroom at the NYC Port Terminal. The Lesbian prostitute hangout for soliciting business is in front of the Talbot's clothing store. She has strange encounters with many women, including one with a police fetish, and a strange merkin salesman in a cemetery. While quite funny at times, one of the most hilarious moments being an encounter with two women in town for an accounting convention, this film, nonetheless, just falls flat and seems completely without any real character development or a clear plot direction. We can do much better than this production.

GERONTOPHILIA
Canada
Rating: AVERAGE
Genre: Coming of Age & Aging

A young man working in a nursing home falls in love with an eighty year old patient in this Bruce Labruce production. Solid performances, with good character development, yet this films pace is at times so slow it could lull the audience to boredom or sleep. It really needed to move quicker and create a greater sense of the emotional bonding of the characters.

IGNASI M.
Spain
Rating: AVERAGE
Genre: Bio-Documentary

Ignasi Millet is a renowned museum expert and art restoration specialist; he is also the father of two boys, has AIDS and takes lots of medications. His parents are both accomplished artists. He fell in love with a woman in a wheelchair and they had their two children; then he came out as Gay. His ex-wife is Bisexual; one of his sons is a Jesus freak. He talks, often quite fast, all the way through film, which includes interviews with his parents, children, ex-wife, friends, and medical providers, which is marginally interesting and funny at times. The film uses some creative production techniques to build an understanding of this flamboyant character; however it is a relief when it finally ends.

LILTING
United Kingdom
Rating: OUTSTANDING!
Genre: Family Drama
FRI MAY 30 | 7:00 PM | HARVARD EXIT
SAT MAY 31 | 2:00 PM | EGYPTIAN

Warning: To avoid spoiling the plot of this absolutely amazing and extraordinary work of film art, major points have been intentionally omitted from this review. A Chinese man and his English lover interact with his aging mother, who doesn't speak English and who dislikes her son's 'friend,' without knowing they are Gay. She is temporarily placed in a senior home until her son can move her in with them after he can get the courage to reveal he's Gay. The boyfriend hires an interpreter to develop an understanding with her, to improve their relationship, as well as to assist her with her prospective male friend, with whom their Chinese-English language barrier is an obstacle. We learn that sometimes relationships are best unspoken. This film constitutes modern Gay cinema of the highest caliber. The character development is so realistic and phenomenal that when the audience realizes the underlying plot though transitional scenes, the emotional attachment to the characters is complete! Beautiful, realistic, and so profound, this is certainly among the most outstanding films in SIFF this year, as well as in Gay cinema. Don't miss out on seeing this wonderful movie!

MAY IN THE SUMMER
Qatar/Lebanon/USA/Jordan
Rating: GOOD
Genre: Family Drama

Three sisters meet up in Qatar with their divorced Mom and Dad for the upcoming marriage of one of the daughters to a professor of Arab ancestry who teaches in the U.S. Dad has remarried and we learn that the very religious mother is having an affair with her former husband. Oh, and one of the daughters, who is a Lesbian, finally comes out to her sisters. Entertaining with good production values as well as strong performances and good character development.

SALVATION ARMY
Morocco/France
Rating: POOR
Genre: Coming of Age/Coming Out

A young Moroccan Gay teenaged boy is used by various older men for sexual exploitation, his mother is abused by his father, and the entire family worships his older brother. Then we skip to 10 years later when he has learned how to manipulate his way out of his home country and into a scholarship in Switzerland through an older Swiss man.

A STREET IN PALERMO
Italy
Rating: AVERAGE
Comedy Drama

Two women face off as the drivers of two cars that come face to face in a narrow street where there is not room enough to pass. One is a widowed woman who lost her daughter and lives to take care of her grandson, she takes care of the stray dogs in the cemetery when she makes her regular visit to her daughters grave. The other driver is a lesbian traveling with her girlfriend who is going to the wedding of a friend, their relationship is on the verge of collapse. The two central characters engage in a stubborn battle to out wait the other to see which is the most persistent and stubborn woman. Meanwhile the grandmothers son in law and relatives decide to create a betting pool of the locals as to which woman will win the test of stubbornness.

TO BE TAKEI
USA
Rating: EXCELLENT
Genre: Bio-Documentary
FRI JUN 6 | 7:00 PM | EGYPTIAN
SAT JUN 7 | 4:00 PM | SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN

A great biographical profile of actor George Takei, whose most famous role as Sulu, in the original 'Star Trek' series, is only one small role in this remarkable man's life as an actor and recent Gay rights activist. As a child he was interred in the Japanese camps with his family, and he went on to become an icon for modern Asian American actors, even though he once had to play stereotypical characters to earn his living. He faced having to choose to live in the closet to maintain his profession, until finally he could no longer reconcile it when California Proposition 8 passed. This well-made production is a perfect example of expert documentary filmmaking, conveying to the audience who this brave and famous person really is and what influenced his life and success.

X/Y
USA
Rating: Below Average
Genre: Drama
SUN JUN 1 | 6:30 PM | Pacific Place
MON JUN 2 | 4:15 PM | Pacific Place

Six twenty-somethings experience the complexities of modern relationships in New York City, which includes some same-sex sexual exploration. They are all in differing phases of their respective relationships, some of which are working well and others are on the verge of falling apart. This is a modern contemporary tale, which will appeal to younger audiences, and likely bore older and more mature or experienced people.

Other upcoming SIFF Films of LGBT Interest:

GAY-LA FILM PRESENTATION:
HELICOPTER MOM
WORLD PREMIERE
USA
Genre: Comedy
WED JUN 4 | 7:00 PM | EGYPTIAN

Followed by Gay-La Party at Q Nightclub
Sponsored in part by Three Dollar Bill Cinema, Greater Seattle Business Association,
The Stranger, Poquitos, Q Nightclub

Regular screening without the party:

THU JUN 5 | 4:00 PM | EGYPTIAN

BOYS
Netherlands
Genre: Coming of Age
MON JUN 2 | 9:30 PM | EGYPTIAN
TUE JUN 3 | 4:00 PM | EGYPTIAN

THE CIRCLE
Switzerland
Genre: Documentary Narrative
TUE JUN 3 | 9:30 PM | HARVARD EXIT
SUN JUN 8 | 12:00 PM | SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN

FUTURO BEACH
Brazil/Germany
Genre: Romance
FRI JUN 6 | 9:30 PM | SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN
SAT JUN 7 | 11:00 AM | EGYPTIAN

ME, MYSELF AND MUM
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
Belgium/France/Spain
Genre: Coming Out & Gender Identity
THU MAY 22 | 9:30 PM | LINCOLN SQUARE
THU MAY 29 | 7:00 PM | EGYPTIAN
SUN JUN 1 | 1:30 PM | SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN

PIERROT LUNAIRE
Germany/Canada
Genre: Experimental
SAT MAY 24 | 10:00 PM | SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN
THU MAY 29 | 10:00 PM | SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN

THE WAY HE LOOKS
Brazil
Genre: Coming of Age
FRI MAY 30 | 9:30 PM | HARVARD EXIT
WED JUN 4 | 4:00 PM | EGYPTIAN

YVES SAINT LAURENT
France
Genre: Biopic Drama
FRI MAY 30 | 8:30 PM | KIRKLAND PC
SAT MAY 31 | 6:30 PM | PACIFIC PLACE


2014 Summer Preview - May & June
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

Even though Captain America: The Winter Soldier was a summer movie shrouded in April clothing, the real silly season at multiplex as far as major Hollywood studios are concerned begins today with the release of The Amazing Spider-Man 2. It's the first in a rather large, and admittedly expected, collection of big budget sequels, remakes, spin-offs and reboots hitting theaters between now and the end of August, all of them hoping to match the $1.2 billion worldwide gross of 2013's Iron Man 3.

This year's crop of tent pole sequels includes X-Men: Days of Future Past (which culls cast members from both the original X-Men as well as X-Men: First Class in an Avengers-style superhero team-up), Transformers: Age of Extinction (with Mark Wahlberg stepping in for Shia LaBeouf), the animated How to Train Your Dragon 2, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (which takes place after a worldwide apocalypse has left humanity in a seemingly hopeless state of disrepair), 22 Jump Street, The Expendables 3, Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy and Sin City: A Dame to Kill For. Other big budget enterprises hoping to bring new life to old standbys include Godzilla, Disney's live action Maleficent, a Michael Bay produced Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson assuming the mantel of Greek hero Hercules.

On the comedy side of the equation, Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore team up for the third time in Blended, Melissa McCarthy hopes to see her star continue to rise with Tammy, Cameron Diaz and Jason Segel reunite for Sex Tape, Kevin Hart and company return for Think Like a Man, Too, Seth Rogen and Zac Efron are a pair of extremely unfriendly Neighbors and Seth MacFarlane tries to prove Ted wasn't a fluke with the Mel Brooks-like western A Million Days to Die in the West. As for the original properties, Disney tosses out the baseball drama Million Dollar Arm, Clint Eastwood's adaptation of the Broadway smash Jersey Boys steps onto the stage, Tom Cruise goes sci-fi Groundhog Day-style with Edge of Tomorrow, Andy and Lana Wachowski return to their interstellar roots with Jupiter Ascending while Twister-wannabe Into the Wind storms into theaters eager to blow away the competition.

For those wanting more serious (or at least more independent) fair, as always there's plenty to choose from just as long as you're willing to put forth the effort to see it. There's Richard Linklater's 12 years in the making Boyhood, Jon Favreau's star-studded dramedy Chef, the faith-based gross-out female-driven comedy (make sense out of all of that, I dare you) Mom's Night Out, Jim Jarmusch's fascinating vampire romance Only Lovers Left Alive, the UW-set Decoding Annie Parker, the spooky sci-fi shocker The Signal, real-time (and real world) thriller Locke with Tom Hardy, and Australian director David Michôd's unsettling looking The Rover, while the late Philip Seymour Hoffman pops up twice appearing in both May's God's Pocket and July's A Most Wanted Man.



The following is a small sampling of films and events hitting Seattle screens between now and the end of June. (I'll work up a separate preview for July and August in a few weeks.) As always, release dates are subject to change so make sure and check with local theaters to make sure the movie you're aching to see is actually going to be playing.

May 2
The Amazing Spider-Man 2, Decoding Annie Parker, Hateship Loveship, Only Lovers Left Alive, Watermark

May 2-12
Seattle Cinerama Sci-Fi Film Festival - The Cinerama stages it's second-ever Science Fiction Film Festival and not only is the lineup itself extraordinary, so are the guests: Sam Jones (Flash Gordon), Tom Skerrit (Alien), Jonathan Frakes (Star Trek: First Contact) and legendary visual effects wunderkind Douglas Trumbull (2001: A Space Odyssey, Brainstorm, Close Encounters of the Third Kind) all scheduled to attend.

May 8-11
Translations: The Seattle Transgender Film Festival - Three Dollar Bill Cinema presents its ninth annual Transgender Film Festival, a full weekend of flicks spanning the gender spectrum on display including the North American premier of Kate Bornstein is a Queer and Pleasant Danger as the closing night selection.

May 9
Fading Gigolo, Fed Up, Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return, Locke, Mom's Night Out, Neighbors, Teenage, Young and Beautiful

May 15-June 8
Seattle International Film Festival - It's baaaack & Seattle's favorite film festival returns for its 40th big screen cinematic adventure, kicking things off with director John Ridley's highly anticipated Jimi Hendrix biopic Jimi: All Is By My Side starring Outkast megastar André Benjamin in the title role.

May 16
Chef, God's Pocket, Godzilla, Million Dollar Arm

May 23
Belle, Blended, Cold in July, The Double, X-Men: Days of Future Past

May 30
A Million Ways to Die in the West, Chinese Puzzle, Filth, The Grand Seduction, Maleficent

June 6
Edge of Tomorrow, The Fault in Our Stars, Gore Vidal: the United States of Amnesia, Obvious Child, Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon, Trust Me, Words and Pictures

June 13
22 Jump Street, Evergreen: The Road to Legalization, How to Train Your Dragon 2, Lucky Them, Palo Alto, The Signal

June 20
Jersey Boys, The Rover, Think Like a Man, Too, Venus in Fur

June 27
Snowpiercer, Transformers: Age of Extinction, Yves Saint Laurent




Theatre22's directors bring Gay Manhattan (circa 1984) to Richard Hugo House with McNally's The Lisbon Traviata and launch their 'Annual Summer Pride Series'
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Once (the musical) is worth seeing twice
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SASQUATCH! - The Myth is real!
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Outbound - Just plane cool: Boeing Factory Tour is fascinating and educational
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SOAP Fest 2014 includes a Yussef El Guindi one-act
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Northwest News
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LETTERS
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Sam Smith comes out, announces Seattle show
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Western comedy A Million Ways fires too many blanks
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Although Angelina Jolie is perfect, the reimagined Maleficent lacks magic
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SIFF Film Synopses & Recommendations
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2014 Summer Preview - May & June
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