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to Section One | to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, October 12, 2012 - Volume 40 Issue 41
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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SLGFF 2012: Part One of our exclusive guide to the 17th annual event
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

Last night at Seattle's landmark Cinerama Theatre, the 17th Annual Seattle Lesbian & Gay Film Festival (SLGFF) kicked off with a gala screening of Struck by Lightning, a high school coming-of-age comedy about a young man hit by lightning who subsequently finds a way to blackmail his fellow students into contributing to his literary magazine. Written by and starring Emmy nominee Chris Colfer (Glee), in many ways the movie was a perfect start to this year's event, embracing the festival's 'Come Out and Play' mantra in all the ways that count.

'Even in our 17th year, programming the festival never gets old,' comments Jason Plourde, interim executive director of Three Dollar Bill Cinema. Speaking the day before Thursday's opening, Jason could hardly contain himself. 'I am definitely excited,' he continues with a smile, 'but of course there's always some nervousness that comes with producing an 11-day, 150-film event that anticipates thousands of attendees. That goes without saying.'

For help programming the 2012 version of SLGFF, Jason pulled from Seattle's rich cinematic resources. 'It was a wonderful experience putting together the festival,' he comments. 'We had a fascinating collection of films to choose from and a diverse group of people viewing, discussing, and selecting films. Our programming committees are led by Keith Bacon, lead programmer, and this year our friend Beth Barrett from the Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) came on board as programming coordinator.'

PUSHING BOUNDARIES
With the world of independent film opening itself to even more diverse and challenging stories, the longtime Three Dollar Bill Cinema stalwart couldn't be happier with both the state of LGBT film at large as well as with the schedule of screenings and events he and his staff have created. 'Filmmakers are telling challenging stories and are expanding the definitions of what LGBT cinema means,' Jason observes. 'Beyond coming-out stories, there are documentaries on social issues, thoughtful relationship dramas, and experimental films [and] I think audiences want films that broaden the genre of LGBT cinema. We know our audience is diverse and the films we show should reflect that. Doing so also makes for a more interesting lineup.'

What about this year's lineup? Any standout selections Jason is personally fond of? 'There's so much to choose from,' he says with a smile. 'I think Habana Muda is one of the most personal and thought-provoking films I've seen all year. It is a look at the lives of deaf Queer people, which is unique. The tribute to Maurice Sendak is a free family program, so bring the kids and celebrate a groundbreaking Gay artist! We're also featuring two films that have won awards at Sundance, Berlin, and countless other festivals, the completely moving and important Call Me Kuchu and our Closing Night film, Young & Wild. That film is definitely an example of envelope-pushing, contemporary, sexual Queer cinema.'

FUN WITH A PURPOSE
For Jason, this year's SLGFF tagline has a special meaning. 'We open this year on National Coming Out Day and 'Come Out and Play' refers to that,' he explains. 'But, even more, it speaks to the fun that happens throughout the festival. Why not encourage people to 'come out' since we know that visibility is what leads to acceptance and understanding of our community, and it's that sort of excitement and commitment from the community that is going to help us Approve Ref 74 in November!'

As for Three Dollar Bill Cinema, the local nonprofit shows no sign of slowing down anytime soon, a full slate of events on the organization's calendar. 'Three Dollar Bill Cinema is doing a lot and we're poised to do even more,' says Jason exuberantly. 'We're starting to bring our programs to areas outside of Seattle and want to do more to support the filmmaking happening in our community. We're also constantly developing and growing our Reel Queer Youth program and hope to have even more young people participate next year.'

BE ADVENTUROUS!
In regard to this year's edition of SLGFF, Jason is more than happy to offer up advice for those making plans to head out to the theater. 'Choose a selection of films that are diverse and may challenge what you would normally see,' he urges. 'Come to the receptions through the week of the festival and talk with other attendees about films and the festival. Definitely come to a program during Take Action Tuesday [October 16]. That whole night is devoted to films that are about issues important to the LGBT community, and organizations will be there to provide information and opportunities to get involved. Most important of all, have fun, enjoy the films, and get inspired!'

Following are capsule reviews for some of the films playing Friday, October 12, through Thursday, October 18 (see next week's SGN for the remainder). Festival passes range from $85 to $210 while individual tickets are $11 (there are senior, youth, and member discounts). Visit www.threedollarbillcinema.org for all the details.

Habuna Muda (Friday, Oct. 12, 5:45 p.m., Northwest Film Forum)
A well-done documentary from director Eric Brach covering three years in the life of deaf-mute Havana farm worker Chino. The movie posits a relatively impossible choice, Chino having to decide if he should flee Cuba to join Jose, a Mexican who claims to have fallen in love with him. Complicating matters are his relationships with his wife and with his friends in the Cuban deaf-mute community. The movie is relatively straightforward and doesn't exactly surprise, but Brach showcases events as they happen with remarkable intimacy and immediacy, the feeling of hope flowing through the picture close to astonishing. (3 stars)

Elliot Loves (Friday, Oct. 12, 7:15 p.m., Northwest Film Forum)
A somewhat standard coming-of-age romance made notable for its robust and invigorating first half, which chronicles its titular protagonist as a questioning nine-year-old (beautifully portrayed by child actor Quentin Araujo). Things get a bit more standard by the time Elliott (now played by Fabio Costaprado) reaches 21, but writer/director Terracino manages his fair share of winning moments and humorously satisfying events to make the familiarity of it all more than tolerable. (2½ stars)

BearCity 2: The Proposal (Friday, Oct. 12, 9:15 p.m., Egyptian Theatre)
As I didn't care for the first film, I can't say I was all that enthused to sit through a sequel. It it's possible, this cheaply produced follow up is an even greater waste of time that the original BearCity was, and it was all I could do to watch all 101 minutes of it without chopping my own head off. Fans of the first film will probably disagree with me, and that's fine, but as far as everyone else is concerned this is a pointless sequel. (1 star)

Girlfriend Boyfriend (Saturday, Oct. 13, 2:30 p.m., Egyptian Theatre)
This solid Taiwanese import involves three childhood friends, Mabel (Lunmei Kwai), Liam (Hsiao-chuan Chang), and Sean (Bryan Shu-Hao Chang), who find themselves in the middle of massive political upheaval when their country falls under martial law. Expertly written and directed by Ya-che Yang, the movie is character-driven and thought-provoking, and if it weren't for the relatively melodramatic conclusion it would come close to perfection. (3½ stars)

Turtle Hill, Brooklyn (Saturday, Oct. 13, 4:45 p.m., Egyptian Theatre)
Relatively standard fare about a pair of happy New Yorkers, Mateo (Ricardo Valdez) and Will (Brian W. Seibert), celebrating the latter's 30th birthday with a party when his highly conservative sister arrives unannounced. Thing is, about halfway through the film, director Ryan Gielen, along with his two stars who also wrote the screenplay, manage to turn things a bit on their head, offering up conversational fodder that becomes increasingly interesting as things progress. It doesn't all come together, and the climax leaves something to be desired, but the movie certainly isn't without its merits - the intellectual challenges it presented were ones I was very happy to explore. (2½ stars)

Satan's Angel: Queen of the Fire Tassels (Saturday, Oct. 13, 9:30 p.m., Northwest Film Forum)
A fascinating documentary about Angel Walker, otherwise known as legendary burlesque star Satan's Angel. Following her career from its start during the 1960s to her current status as teacher to a new generation of burlesque stars, director Joshua M. Dragotta manages to weave an involving portrait of a fearless entertainer proud of who she is, where's she's come from, and where she's driven to go to next. Outstanding. (3½ stars)

No Look Pass (Sunday, Oct. 14, 4 p.m., Egyptian Theatre)
Another documentary standout, No Look Pass chronicles the life of Emily 'Etay' Tay, a Burmese immigrant attending Harvard while also trying to become a basketball superstar playing professionally in Europe when she's not attending classes or studying for exams. Director Melissa Johnson presents her story with compassion and energy, making for an invigorating journey almost impossible to fathom or forget. (3 stars)

Call Me Kuchu (Sunday, Oct. 14, 7 p.m., Egyptian Theatre)
This year's Centerpiece Gala presentation is the single best film playing at the festival and arguably one of the best documentaries I've seen in all of 2012. The picture chronicles David Kato, an openly Gay Ugandan man fighting tooth and nail against pending legislation that would make homosexuality punishable by death. Unrelenting, the movie is a remarkable examination of a man and a country seemingly at odds, everything building to a conclusion that's as shocking as it is, ultimately, hopeful. A must-see. (4 stars)

Men to Kiss (Sunday, Oct. 14, 7 p.m., Northwest Film Forum)
Ugh. A substandard German import about a Gay couple visiting a family friend with plans to do their relationship irreparable harm, Men to Kiss is an anemic romantic comedy that goes downhill (and nowhere of interest) very, very fast. (1½ stars)

Mixed Kebab (Sunday, Oct. 14, 9:30 p.m., Egyptian Theatre)
A disappointing Belgian effort about a headstrong young man, Ibrahim (Cem Akkanat), who declines marriage to the lovely Elif (Gamze Tazim) to live with his friend and lover Kevin (Simon Van Buyten) instead, Mixed Kebab starts well and is engagingly acted by its leads, but quickly runs out of steam as it goes along. Worse, the movie can't decide whether it's a comedy or a drama, uneasily waffling between the two for almost all of its relatively brief 98-minute running time. (2 stars)

Facing Mirrors (Monday, Oct. 15, 9:30 p.m., Northwest Film Forum)
This outstanding Iranian import, originally screening during Three Dollar Bill Cinema's Translations Transgender Film Festival, returns, and audiences who missed seeing it the first time around are in for a real treat. A strong drama, the movie paints a picture of a country and a culture most know little about, finding universal themes in its story of outsiders connecting to one another. (3½ stars)

For My Wife... (Tuesday, Oct. 16, 5:45 p.m., Northwest Film Forum, free admission)
A magnificent, if a bit too short, documentary chronicling the tragedy behind the death of celebrated local musician Kate Fleming. Trapped in her basement during a flood, Kate is freed by her spouse of nine years, Charlene Strong, who rushes her to the hospital only to be told she cannot stay at Kate's side unless a blood relative gives permission. Co-directors David Rothmiller and L.D. Thompson do a remarkable job of bringing this story to light, showing how this tragedy affected Strong and led her to work tirelessly to change Washington state law to allow for domestic partners to be at the side of their loved ones and to make decisions on their behalf. Charlene Strong and the directors are scheduled to attend the screening. (3½ stars)

Kiss Me (Thursday, Oct. 18, 9:30 p.m., Northwest Film Forum)
This surprisingly engaging Swedish romantic comedy/drama shouldn't be anywhere as entertaining as it is, writer/director Alexandra-Therese Keining presenting your typical tale of a young woman, Mia (Ruth Vega Fernandez), on the verge of marriage who thanks to a single kiss starts questioning her love for her fiancé as well as her own sexuality. Even though it follows rather familiar terrain, Keining manages to craft a script filled with wit, insight, and humor that kept me continually interested to see what was going to happen next. Coupled with strong performances from leads Fernandez and Liv Mjönes, the resulting movie is an engaging frolic that's difficult to dislike. (3 stars)


'We have re-closeted ourselves'
Ira Sachs' latest film is a much-needed corrective to current Queer cinema

by Gary M. Kramer - Special to the SGN

KEEP THE LIGHTS ON
SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN
Opens October 5


In an empty hotel bar on a summer Sunday morning, openly Gay filmmaker Ira Sachs spoke - in hushed, almost confessional tones that revealed his thoughtfulness - about his award-winning new film, Keep the Lights On. This searing drama about Eric (Thure Lindhardt), a filmmaker whose lover Paul (Zachary Booth) is a drug addict, is based on the Sachs' own experiences in a toxic, co-dependent relationship.

Sachs demurred at any suggestion that he made this film to exorcise his own demons. 'I don't begin to write a film until I have both the intimacy of the experience but also the distance to view the story as a storyteller - the analytic distance is as important as the emotional intimacy for me,' he said. 'I feel this film is a rebirth for me. I think that in the wake of the experiences on which this film is based, I've become more comfortable with myself, and that's shifted my work and the openness of my filmmaking. I think this is my freest film.'

DESPERATION AND DESIRE
Keep the Lights On is certainly Sachs' most personal project since his extraordinary first feature, The Delta, back in 1996. That film concerned a closeted 18-year-old white man in Memphis who begins a clandestine affair with a half-Vietnamese, half-African-American man. Keep the Lights On is not only Sachs' first Queer-themed feature since then, but it is also his most passionate - not just for its considerable eroticism, but also for its heartfelt emotional resonance. The characters' despair and desire are palpable.

'As a filmmaker, I'm always mining my own experience - because it is what I know best. I try to make films about things I know more about than anyone else,' he continued, quickly adding, 'But I never sense that privileges my story over others.'

Keep the Lights On is a strong, extremely well-crafted story that has universal appeal. While it will resonate with anyone who has ever loved an addict, it will also speak to those who want to understand the intricacies of human nature and behavior. Eric and Paul each keep secrets as they find ways of coping with the corrosive nature of their relationship. How they each fare by the end of the film is revealing.

Sachs, who described his drama as a 'tabula rasa,' said many people who see it talk to him afterward about their own relationships. He also indicated that some folks don't consider it a 'Gay film,' citing the example of a psychologist in his 80s who said it is 'not a film about love, or addiction, but about obsession.'

'That was very clarifying to me,' the filmmaker observed. 'I think what happens, for a lot of people - and this can be through other individuals, it can be through sex, it can be through drugs - is that by narrowing the range of what compels you to another person, you kind of silence the loud noises that are surrounding you.

A SHAMELESS LOOK AT SHAME
'Obsession is a very comfortable place to be,' he added, smiling noticeably. He paused, and quoted Emmylou Harris' song, 'Where Will I Be,' which includes the lyric, 'Addiction stays on tight like a glove.'

Sachs reframed that idea, saying, 'I thought about that often in my life. I think addiction can be to a person as much as a drug.'

The filmmaker revealed that he was involved with Al-Anon and had learned what he could from the experience. He described this 'research' as a way of formulating the content of his film - 'how my behavior was cyclical and unenlightened in terms of the role that I played within the dynamic of this relationship.'

Sachs added that he worked through his own guilt and pain about his relationship in therapy. He then referenced Goodfellas, of all films, to explain that his goal in making Keep the Lights On was to 'depict bad behavior, but not judge that behavior or shy away from the consequence of what we do in our lives. I attempted to make a film about shame, but to do so shamelessly. I wanted to look without judgment at the behavior and the actions of these characters.'

Viewers surely will connect with - and understand - Eric's struggle as he tries to help Paul during his downward spiral. His efforts to try to maintain hope for their relationship are evident even when that relationship is at the apex of its crisis.

Keep the Lights On unfolds over 10 years, with some episodes happening on one particular day and others over an indeterminate period. This oblique narrative approach is forceful because it shows how Eric and Paul relate to one another over various jumps in time - in ways that range from warm and caring to cold and fighting, but with always some element of love.

'The script is like a diary,' Sachs commented. 'If you think about diaries and journals, they are made up of events and ellipses. You write in your journal when something bothers you. So the film is, like, all the high points.'

These include an incredibly tense moment when Eric places a call to see if he's contracted HIV, and a seductive scene in which Eric is offered a drug and warily tries it, perhaps in an effort to understand what Paul finds so alluring about crack and crystal meth.

'THE BRAVEST ACTOR IN DENMARK' Keep the Lights On benefits immensely from Lindhardt's revelatory performance as Eric. Sachs, a nice Jewish Gay man from Memphis, said it was liberating to cast the Danish actor as his alter ego. 'I was free from any attachment from the past,' he explained.

He then effused about Lindhardt, 'I didn't set up to cast a Danish guy. I heard Thure was the bravest actor in Denmark and one of the best. I sent him the script, and he auditioned by doing a few scenes from the film on his cell phone. He chose all the scenes he could do alone, which meant a lot of masturbation scenes. There was a fearlessness - even in the audition - that was apparent, as well as an extraordinarily vibrant energy to have as an actor.'

Sachs added that he could not easily cast this film in America because of its Queer sexuality and explicit nature. 'Believe it or not,' he said, 'I sent the material to an agency in Los Angeles that I always send new work to, and I got the response, 'No one in our agency will be available for this film.'

This led to a discussion of the current state of Queer filmmaking. Sachs remarked that his latest work is part of a 'new Queer cinema' that focuses more on relationships and less on coming-out stories. Keep the Lights On considers what Sachs called 'the nocturnal world of Gay life.'

'I think we have to recognize that there are still so few images of what Gay life looks like, particularly around sex and drugs,' he said. 'We as individuals and as a community have re-closeted ourselves. We've created a safe space where we can have certain kinds of experiences, and then we've stopped talking about them and stopped looking at them. There's very, very little about Gay life as I know it on film.'

Sachs continued on this rant, as he insisted that even his film's title is a call to arms for the audience. 'It's a direct address for people in the cinema to not live in the darkness,' he said. 'I think as Gay people, we have learned out of need to live with secrets. This film, in a way, is a testament to the destruction those secrets can create. The film is very, very open about two men who keep everything closed.'

RAISING THE DRUG ISSUE
Sachs insisted that Keep the Lights On is not an 'anti-drug' film, but he asserted that people need to talk about drugs. He expressed hope that his film will spark conversations about the place of drugs, particularly meth, in the Gay community.

The filmmaker likened the current crystal-meth epidemic among Gays to the invasion of the African-American community by crack cocaine in the early 1980s. 'It was a fuel that set off a huge fire, and I think we are in the middle of that,' he said. 'But there is a way of ending it, and that's to admit it. I think it's another closet. We're very used to creating closets and staying in them.'

As angry as Sachs gets, his calm demeanor reinforces the very happy place he is in now. Sachs and his partner, Ecuadorian artist Boris Torres - whose beautiful and sexy artwork is seen under the film's opening credits - have been together for five years.

'I feel like I came out at 40 in a lot of ways,' Sachs, who is now in his mid-40s, said sunnily. 'I live a very different way now. This relationship I'm in now is the first honest relationship I've been in.'

The couple recently became parents of twins - a boy and a girl - and the proud father displayed cute photos of two adorable, smiling babies who surely have had a transformative effect of their own on both him and Torres.

'I tried to start keeping a journal when we had kids,' he said. 'Because I found it complex to be a parent - and fascinating and wonderful. Maybe it's too wonderful to write about.'


Many perks to viewing near-perfect Wallflower
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER
Opens September 28


It's been longer than I care to admit, but I still can recall my high school years like they were yesterday. I remember wandering the halls without a pass, heading out on the practice field after stretching in the gym, engaging in heated debates about what story to put on the front page afterhours in the journalism room, and standing in the corner at the Homecoming dance chatting with my friends. I can recall more of my four years as a John R. Rogers Pirate than many of you might think - the highs, lows, and in-betweens in many ways feeling as if they happened yesterday.

I'm not sure I've felt more kinship with a motion picture in recent memory than I have with screenwriter and director Stephen Chbosky's stunning adaption of his own 1999 novel The Perks of Being a Wallflower. At the very least, I haven't seen a movie in 2012 that's affected me quite so intimately, that's moved me in ways difficult to describe and maybe even harder to comprehend. What I do know is that the characters that make up its story, the travails all of them go through, freshman and senior alike, were all ones I felt affiliation with, allowing the funny, heartfelt, and deeply moving drama to become an instant favorite I'm positive I'll return to numerous times in the future.

Of course, there are certain aspects (I don't remotely intend on ruining anything here, so don't expect me to elaborate) that are not close to anything I experienced during my own high school journey. At the same time, the mood of the piece - the way the characters related to one another, the way the haves and the have-nots mingled, made use of one another, became friends, and allowed exterior forces to make them enemies - all of it felt natural, honest, and true. The simple fact is the mistakes we make are the ones we tend to hold onto the longest, our most magnificent triumphs often paling compared to our most insignificant failures.

But that first kiss, that first caress, the first time we held someone else's hand and realized there was a connection going way beyond the physical, all of that and more comes to the forefront in Chbosky's miraculously multifaceted narrative. These are kids we know, definitely of the here-and-now, but also of the 1991 the film is set in. More than that, though, the angst they feel, the apprehensions and the fears they share, the community they create, and the bonds they celebrate are universal, speaking to the kid in all of us no matter what our age or which generation we call ourselves a part of.

I admit I was apprehensive and nervous about the film before entering the theater. Part of me couldn't help but feel that I needed to see another teenage coming-of-age story like I needed someone to slap me across the face with a two-by-four. What new was there to say? What roads not already well-traveled could this group of characters hope to go down? It all sounded like a two-hour festival of melodramatic clichés, and even though I knew of the acclaim Chbosky's novel had achieved, that didn't mean I was willing or ready to believe the adaptation would be more than ordinary.

Color me wrong. This movie may journey into familiar territory, may not always be able to avoid convention entirely, but that doesn't mean it is anything other than magnificent, start to finish. Every time I thought Chbosky was going to take a wrong turn, every time I feared he'd let the proceedings drown in rote cliché, somehow he managed to surprise me, showing a form of hypnotic restraint that held me spellbound.

And what is that story? In all honesty, my summarizing it here isn't particularly important. Just know that what transpires is seen through the eyes of Pittsburgh high school freshman Charlie (Logan Lerman), a teenage loner still reeling from the dual losses of his best friend from middle school via suicide and his beloved Aunt Helen (Melanie Lynskey), thanks to an auto accident a handful of years prior. In high school, he comes into contact with seniors Patrick (Ezra Miller) and Sam (Emma Watson), a brother-sister combo (by marriage, not blood) who decide to take him under their wing, bringing him into their tight-knit circle of friends.

What happens from there? I'm not going to tell you, but by and large it's not that difficult to anticipate a lot of it. Save for a couple of third-act revelations, where the movie is headed is never in doubt, Charlie's voyage of self-discovery as tried and true as any that's been told. It's the getting there that makes what happens so special, the way that Chbosky understands his characters and how he manufactures the world around them, allowing the film to resonate on a mystifying, innermost level few others covering similar terrain have matched.

The cast is uniformly excellent. Lerman, a bit out of his element in both the recent remake of The Three Musketeers remake as well as in Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief, acquits himself beautifully as Charlie, his performance building with a subtle eloquence that took me by surprise. Harry Potter standout Watson also proves that she's got more in her than that particular saga - a pair of scenes with Lerman, both inside Sam's bedroom yet profoundly different from one another, are so outstanding they might be the best individual moments I've seen all year.

Yet it is Miller, so good in both We Need to Talk About Kevin and City Island, who blew me away. His performance as Patrick is one of the best of 2012, deserving of as many accolades and awards that could be thrown his way. The places he goes to, the emotions he mines, all of it comes together in a way I couldn't help but be enamored with, and as great as everyone else is - and they are outstanding - his is the performance I'll cherish the longest after the dust settles and my euphoria begins to wane.

Not that I expect said waning to happen anytime soon. Chbosky's movie is a revelation, a marvel of dramatic simplicity and model of a narrative integrity numerous other filmmakers should take note of. He proves that you can take familiar material and make it something special, can find a way to transcend inherent melodrama and take things to a lofty plateau that's as profound as it is true-to-life. The Perks of Being a Wallflower took me back to my own high school years allowing me to revisit them in ways I haven't in eons, the experience of watching it a cathartic free-for-all I can't wait to revel in again.




Bringing the Love
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MAGIC MIKA
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Carried away
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Pullman Porter Blues flawed but worthwhile
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Remaking history
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Past, Present & Future
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Argo a tensely terrific true-life thriller
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Gossip more than just talk at Showbox
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Ring Shoppin' - Babeland
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SLGFF 2012: Part One of our exclusive guide to the 17th annual event
------------------------------
'We have re-closeted ourselves'
------------------------------
Many perks to viewing near-perfect Wallflower
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Q-Scopes by Jack Fertig
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Her roots are showing
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Northwest News
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Letters
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