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Back to Section One | Back to Arts & Entertainment
posted Friday, June 8, 2012 - Volume 40 Issue 23
Movie Reviews
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
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2012 summer movie preview, part II
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

Did you know The Avengers has made more than a billion dollars worldwide in only 19 days of release? Pretty crazy, I know. Can any of the big-budget wonders scheduled for release during July and August do the same? The chances of that happening rest somewhere between incredibly slim and virtually none, which is saying something when you consider that 2012's most anticipated motion picture, Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight Rises, the capper to his Batman trilogy, goes into wide release July 20. If any movie has the chance to produce similar box-office results it's that one, although even with Imax surcharges I think it's unlikely.

But Nolan's opus isn't the only reason to get excited about the last two months of the Summer Movie silly season. Plenty of titles both big and small are worthy of letting one's anticipatory giddiness run wild. As of now, here's what's scheduled to hit Seattle theaters in July and August. Release dates are, as always, subject to change.

July 3
The Amazing Spider-Man - It's a long way from (500) Days of Summer, but director Marc Webb tries to reinvigorate the Marvel Comics stalwart, rebooting the series only five years after the last installment web-slung its way into theaters.

July 5
Katy Perry: Part of Me - A 3D Katy Perry concert documentary. Yeah, I wasn't clamoring for this one either - and I kinda like her music.

July 6
A Cat in Paris - Last year's surprise nominee for Best Animated Film finally makes its domestic, non-festival debut. It's awesome. Go see it.

Savages - Oliver Stone gets down and dirty with an adaptation of Don Winslow's bestseller about a pair of smalltime pot growers who suddenly find themselves at war with a ruthless Mexican drug cartel when their mutual girlfriend is kidnapped.

To Rome With Love - Woody Allen's latest finds him trotting through Italy with an all-star cast (including Penélope Cruz, Ellen Page, Alec Baldwin, Jesse Eisenberg, Greta Gerwig, Judy Davis, and Roberto Benigni) chronicling a trio of romantic misadventures on the cobblestone streets of Rome.

July 13
Beasts of the Southern Wild - This one is borderline indescribable, but considering the reactions coming out of Sundance and the fact that it's gotten a plum showcase at this year's Cannes Film Festival, I'm not kidding when I say it's more or less at the top of my summertime must-see list. What's it about? Why ruin the surprise - the title pretty much says it all.

Elena - Russian import involving a broken marriage, class alienation, and a mysterious inheritance that showcases esteemed director Andrei Zvyagintsev (The Return) at very top of his game. Twisty and twisted, this is a small-scale gem not easily forgotten.

Ice Age: Continental Drift - The gang's all here as Manny, Diego, Sid, and all the rest find themselves set adrift upon a wayward iceberg and forced to battle new dangers and unforeseen obstacles they previously never could have imagined. In other news, it's becoming quite apparent this prehistoric well is running close to dry.

Take This Waltz - Actress-turned-director Sarah Polley's (Away From Her) latest chronicles the apparent downfall of a seemingly happily married young woman (Michelle Williams) who suddenly finds herself falling in love with the goofy artist (Seth Rogen) who's recently moved in next door.

Ted - Mark Wahlberg finds dealing with a walking/talking teddy bear as an adult is far less fun than it was when he wished for it to happen as a child. Seth MacFarlane fans take note, this R-rated comedy goes places Family Guy only wishes it could.

July 20
The Dark Knight Rises - As the ads have stated, this is the final chapter in Christopher Nolan's Bruce Wayne saga, the film picking up eight years after his last adventure. Catwoman is here and so is Bane, while Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Marion Cotillard round things out as a pair of characters of which little to almost nothing is known.

Grassroots - A political satire all Seattle residents will want to see - the untold story of the monorail vote (and revote, and revote, and revote) mixed with the saga of a City Council candidate trying to get his voice heard to virtually no avail. Directed by Stephen Gyllenhaal (Losing Isaiah) and based on Phil Campbell's best-selling book.

Trishna - Michael Winterbottom (A Mighty Heart) tackles Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles, setting the action in India and attempting to give it new resonance for the modern age. Saw this at a SIFF press screening. It's good, but never quite strikes the heartbreaking emotional chord it needs to for it to completely resonate.

July 25
Ruby Sparks - Paul Dano as a writer who, lonely and without a girlfriend, wills his latest literary creation into real-life existence (because, you know, that's always a good idea).

July 27
Easy Money - Swedish import about drug runners and the cartels that own them. The Killing and future RoboCop remake star Joel Kinnaman is the central figure portraying a man out to make a few quick bucks, who suddenly finds himself way over his head.

Step Up Revolution - The dance dance revolution continues in this fourth installment, set in Florida, where a group of street performers try to stop a greedy developer from transforming their stomping grounds into a posh resort.

The Watch - Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn, and Jonah Hill as a group of suburban dads who start a neighborhood watch patrol and suddenly find themselves battling an alien invasion. Hopefully there won't be any hoodies.

August 3 Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry - Documentary about Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei; stunning, arguably an early frontrunner for Best Documentary Feature at next year's Academy Awards.

The Bourne Legacy - Matt Damon may be gone, but his story continues with Jeremy Renner picking things up as another Treadstone agent thrust into a massive conspiracy seemingly beyond his control. Rachel Weisz and Edward Norton co-star, while Albert Finney, Joan Allen, David Strathairn, and Oscar Isaac all return to help fill in the blanks.

Dark Horse - Caustic director Todd Solondz (Welcome to the Dollhouse, Life During Wartime) returns with an innocent-sounding romance that undoubtedly will be anything but. Selma Blair, Justin Bartha, Mia Farrow, and Christopher Walken star.

Total Recall - The Philip K. Dick short story, adapted back in 1990 by Paul Verhoeven with Arnold Schwarzenegger starring, is remade by Underworld auteur Len Wiseman with Colin Farrell, Kate Beckinsale, Jessica Biel, Ethan Hawke, Bryan Cranston, and Bill Nighy in the central roles.

August 10 The Campaign - Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis battle it out as two North Carolina politicians with an eye on the White House.

Hope Springs - Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones as a couple going to counselor Steve Carell for advice after three-plus decades of marriage. The Devil Wears Prada director David Frankel orchestrates the comedic mayhem.

August 17 The Expendables 2 - Sylvester Stallone once again rounds up his gang of B-movie all-stars for a second adventure. Jason Statham, Jet Li, Dolph Lundgren, Bruce Willis, and Arnold Schwarzenegger return, with Chuck Norris and Jean-Claude Van Damme also getting in on the bullet-riddled action.

The Odd Life of Timothy Green - Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton as a married couple wishing for a child, who place their dreams of their hoped-for offspring in a box they bury in the backyard. When he's born, magic follows.

ParaNorman - Stop-motion animated fable about a boy who can speak to the dead, and who must use all his supernatural powers to save his town from an onslaught of ghouls, ghosts, and zombies.

Sparkle - Remake of the 1976 musical starring the late Whitney Houston in her final role. Former American Idol winner Jordin Sparks co-stars as an up-and-coming singing sensation Houston is forced to take under her wing.

August 24 The Apparition - A college experiment unleashes a supernatural demon intent on killing all in its path.

Hit & Run - Getaway driver Dax Shepard is forced to go on the run with his girlfriend (Kristen Bell) in tow when bad guy Bradley Cooper shows up on his doorstep demanding the money from their last bank robbery. Much vehicular mayhem ensues.

Premium Rush - Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a New York bicycle messenger who inadvertently ends up with a package that a whole range of villains want to get their hands on. No, it isn't a remake of the Kevin Bacon turkey Quicksilver, but you'd be forgiven for thinking so.

August 29 Lawless - John Hillcoat follows up The Road with a story about Depression-era bootleggers and the authorities out to make an example of them. This film is debuting at the Cannes Film Festival and is one of my most eagerly anticipated of 2012.

August 31 The Possession - Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Kyra Sedgwick as recently divorced parents who find themselves reunited when their daughter comes into possession of a mysterious wooden box containing the soul of a demon. Sam Raimi produces.


Spellbinding Kingdom a land of inspired plenty
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

MOONRISE KINGDOM
Opens June 8


On a tiny island off the New England coast, 12- year- olds Sam (Jared Gilman) and Suzy (Kara Hayward) have decided to run away into the wilderness. It is the summer of 1965, and Khaki Scout leader Scout Master Ward (Edward Norton) is beside himself that one of his charges has disappeared, while on the flip side of things parents Walt (Bill Murray) and Laura Bishop (Frances McDormand) cannot believe their beautiful, if slightly odd, daughter would do such a crazy thing. It is up to local police chief Captain Sharp (Bruce Willis) to round up the two wayward youngsters and bring them back to those purportedly in charge - no small task considering a major storm is heading for the island and help from the Khaki Scout troop or from the Bishops themselves isn't proving fruitful.

There's more, of course, including Bob Balaban narrating the proceedings, Harvey Keitel as the militaristic titular head of the Khaki Scouts, Jason Schwartzman as conniving Uncle Ben, and Tilda Swinton as the frigid embodiment of Social Services - all of which is fully to be expected in a wildly flippant frolic sprung from the mind of director Wes Anderson.

What isn't as anticipated is just how jovial his latest, Moonrise Kingdom, is, how fully it embraces the nature and rapturous aura of young love. The filmmaker, working once again with The Darjeeling Limited co- writer Roman Coppola, captures a mood and a sensation that is as immediate as it is universal.

I'm not entirely sure how much more to say. Like most Anderson products, the style of the piece is immediately identifiable. It's evident in the very first frames that this is the same man who brought forth Rushmore, who handled The Royal Tenenbaums, who put so much energy in effort into the wildly uneven The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and soared to new heights with The Fantastic Mr. Fox. The European New Wave leanings of Robert D. Yeoman's (Bridesmaids) cinematography, the slightly off- center pebbledashes of Adam Stockhausen's (Scream 4) production design and Gerald Sullivan's (Youth in Revolt) art direction, all of it works in sensational tandem, Anderson again crafting an esoteric milieu fitting the era and the time he's working in, yet also feeling as if it were sprung from a particularly inventive picture book.

Which in many ways is exactly the point. As things progress, Suzy slowly finds herself transforming into an erstwhile Wendy Darling, telling stories to a gaggle of fellow youngsters, all of them looking up at her in mesmerized bliss. As for Sam, in many ways he is Peter Pan, refusing to grow up but learning vital life lessons as he treads down a path of responsibility and maturation he's not remotely ready for. It's like they've all stepped through to the other side of the Looking Glass while heading to Neverland, and found themselves stranded in a Hundred Acre Wood of their own feverish imagination, with all the adults looking on trying to figure out what's happened.

It was pretty risky to anchor an entire film upon two newcomers in Gilman and Hayward, neither of whom had any cinematic experience before Anderson cast them here. Yet it is a risk that pays off, the director's camera lingering over the pair in a way that is blissfully relatable. Both showcase shocking chemistry, not just with each other but with the other actors as well. Hayward, in particular, has the ability to mesmerize like a newly pubescent Cheshire Cat, her lingering gaze so bewitching she almost doesn't need a single line of dialogue to amaze.

Moonrise Kingdom has the potential to be a movie I'll be pondering, mulling over, and thinking about for the remainder of 2012. Heck, it might even enter into the upper echelon of the Wes Anderson canon, joining Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums, and The Fantastic Mr. Fox - films I already consider modern classics. This movie is a haunting paean to who we were as youngsters, who we wanted to be as adolescents, and who we imagine we might still become as adults. For that reason alone, I'm ready to declare it a masterwork.


There's not much alien about Prometheus
by Sara Michelle Fetters - SGN A&E Writer

Prometheus
Now Playing


Prometheus is not a prequel to Alien - let's get that out of the way up front. Ridley Scott stated in numerous interviews that the movie had 'Alien DNA' but was otherwise unconnected to his 1979 opus or the three sequels that followed it. As dubious as that claim sounded at the time, after watching the film it is clear he was being honest - the director's return to the world of science fiction for the first time since 1982's Blade Runner is more than your average intergalactic creature-feature.

So what is Prometheus? A week later I'm still trying to figure that out. At its core, the intricate and complicated screenplay by Damon Lindelof (Cowboys & Aliens) and Jon Spaihts (The Darkest Hour) wants to be about the origins of man, i.e., a theoretical discussion about Darwinism and religion and how both relate to evolutionary theory. Who are we? Where do we come from? Where do we go from here? Are we alone in the universe? These are just a few of the questions the film purports to ask, the end product interested not so much in answers as it is in reigniting an age-old debate.

At the same time, the movie is also a big-budget Hollywood thriller filled with stock characters, familiar story beats, and a series of scares - most of which can be seen coming millions of light years away. It doesn't quite know what to do with itself when all is said and done, the final product reaching for the stars while frustratingly coming up short as it waves at them with somewhat fruitless abandon.

After an ominous and unsettling opening title sequence, the story begins in 2089 with two archeologists, Elizabeth Shaw (Noomi Rapace) and Charlie Holloway (Logan Marshall-Green), making an otherworldly discovery in Scotland's Isle of Skye. Fast-forward a couple of years, and the pair find themselves aboard the spaceship Prometheus (named after the Greek god), heading to an unexplored planet in a far corner of the galaxy. Their expedition has been financed by elderly billionaire industrialist Peter Weyland (Guy Pearce), who shares their interest in discovering mankind's origins.

From there things follow a relatively familiar playbook. Headstrong captain Janek (Idris Elba) is skeptical their excursion to this planet will meet with success, while child-like humanoid robot David (Michael Fassbender) might not be near as innocent as he first appears, and icy executive Meredith Vickers (Charlize Theron) hides an agenda she's loath to share with Shaw and Holloway. The group of scientists and astronauts explore the planet, make shocking discoveries, and uncover a secret that could very well lead to Earth's demise.

What I didn't expect is just how hypnotic the first two-thirds of this adventure proved to be. Scott orchestrates the action with almost Kubrick-like efficiency, weaving all of Lindelof and Spaihts' nebulous plot strings together with ease. Subtle homage is paid to both Alien and Aliens, and the first foray into the mysterious complex that once housed gigantic beings similar to humans, yet far more advanced, is an astonishing feat of technical, visual, and storytelling wizardry. The movie drew me in and had me right where it wanted me, every fiber of my being intimately interested in learning more.

So what's the problem? Well, first off, while the majority of the cast is excellent - Rapace, Theron, and Elba in particular - none of them play particularly interesting characters. On top of that, some of what they do and how others respond to these actions doesn't make a lick of sense, and the final third is so overly rushed and frenetic that much of the dialogue is lost in the sound and fury. Marshall-Green's character in particular is a whiny wet noodle I couldn't wait to be done with. His sullen response to his and his beloved's monumental breakthrough on this heretofore unexplored world is extraordinarily bizarre.

Yet Prometheus can't be written off. Despite my dissatisfaction with the last 20 minutes I can't wait to see the film again, to let what Scott is talking about and hinting at sink in more thoroughly. I'm also beyond taken with Fassbender's David, easily the movie's most important and intriguing character, his evolutionary process in many ways the key ingredient around which all else revolves. Once again, the actor is a revelation, his performance another in a long line of divine balancing acts.

Forget about the monsters, forget about the Machiavellian corporate tinkering, forget about Shaw's handling of an invasive abuse of her privacy and body which literally caused one member of my preview audience to faint from shock - none of that matters in the grand scheme of things. It is David who matters the most, his journey the one I tend to think will have the most long-lasting impact and the one where the majority of the answers to many of the drama's humanistic riddles can be found.

It is easy to see why, after 30 years, Scott chose Prometheus as his return to science fiction. It's chock full of ideas, gives him a massive canvas to work upon, and allows him to directly tackle questions he's tinkered around with in one way or another since 1977's The Duelists. If the movie ends up leaving something to be desired it isn't for lack of trying on his part. Scott has gone all-out in regard to this particular opus, and as far as evolutions go, his own - into Stanley Kubrick or Terrence Malick - isn't as ungainly or as farfetched as one might initially believe.


Last call for SIFF 2012: Film festival heads into its final weekend
by Herb Krohn - Special to the SGN

Seattle International Film Festival 2012 wraps up this weekend with some great film choices still remaining. Here is a brief guide for SGN readers attending SIFF in its last days.

Gayby
Rating: Poor
Genre: Comedy
USA
Friday, June 8, 4 p.m. - Egyptian Theatre
Sunday, June 10, 2 p.m. - SIFF Cinema Uptown

This is an all-too-familiar example of the mediocrity of modern American Gay filmmaking. The intent seemed to be to create a Gay-themed film geared to a straight audience, since every bad cliché - along with the usual effeminate, wisecracking, shallow Gay male stereotypes - is utilized in this unfunny comedy. The expectations were high for this film (it was this year's feature in SIFF's annual Gay-La gala), but the result is worse than disappointing. Certainly in 2012 we should demand much more from LGBT comedic filmmaking - we have matured as a community, yet you would never know it from watching this. Production values were solid, however.

Lipstikka
Rating: Very good
Genre: Coming-of-age/psychodrama
Israel/UK (partially subtitled)
Friday June 8, 9:30 p.m. - SIFF Cinema Uptown
Sunday June 10, 4 p.m. - Pacific Place

Lara and Inam were best friends and possibly more than that while growing up as teenagers in the Palestinian territories. Their lives are forever changed by a chance meeting with two Israeli soldiers when they sneak across the border into Israel one night after curfew to go to a movie. The film leads off 15 years later when they are both living in London, as Inam drops over unexpectedly, and apparently somewhat unwelcomed, to visit Lara on her birthday. Part coming-of-age tale and part psychodrama, the story plays itself out through flashbacks in time to finally reveal the full story at the conclusion.

This unique motion picture crosses many boundaries while it takes the audience deeply into the lives of the characters. Writer/Director Jonathan Sagall has created a film that will keep the audience guessing and anticipating throughout as to what really transpired in the women's mutual past and how it affects their present relationship.

The production values are strong, yet it is the excellent performances by veteran actresses Clara Khoury (Lara) and Nataly Attiya (Inam) who portray their conflicted intertwined characters with amazing realism. When the film reaches its conclusion, the final plot twist is completely unexpected, yet it resolves all the questions left in the minds of the audience. No loose threads remain in the plot, which seems entirely plausible and consistent. This is a worthwhile SIFF film to catch this year and a demonstration of the current state of Israeli filmmaking.

Here are some other still-upcoming SIFF films identified as of LGBT interest. For more information on these movies, visit www.siff.net.

The British Guide to Showing Off
Genre: Documentary fantasy
UK
Friday, June 8, 4 p.m. - Kirkland Performance Center

Chapiteau-Show
Genre: Surreal comedy drama
Russia (subtitled)
Friday, June 8, 8:30 p.m. - AMC Pacific Place 11
Saturday, June 9, 3:30 p.m. - Kirkland Performance Center

The Crown Jewels
Genre: Mystery drama
Sweden (subtitled)
Sunday, June 10, 4:30 p.m. - Egyptian Theatre

White Camellias
Genre: Romantic drama
USA (with some subtitled Spanish dialogue)
Saturday, June 9, 4 p.m. - AMC Pacific Place 11

The following films have had their final SIFF screening, but are worth looking for in future release:

Joshua Tree, 1951: A Portrait of James Dean
Rating: Very good
Genre: Biopic/erotic drama
USA

Was James Dean Gay? That is still a matter of great speculation and debate. Nonetheless, this very stylish, mostly black-and-white portrayal of what may or may not have been his early days as he struggled to enter the acting profession is a beautiful example of cinematic production. Sepia toning lends an aura of realism and visual richness to this erotic art film. It should be coming back soon to a theater near you.

Keep the Lights On
Rating: Good
Genre: Erotic drama
USA

This romantic Gay drama charts the relationship of two men over a decade, from their meeting on a phone sex line to their breakup when they realize they cannot make it work. While in many aspects it focuses on the negativity of modern urban Gay male society, including drug addiction, sexual promiscuity, and the like, it does so with a degree of intelligence and depth. However, it is unbalanced in its portrayals of the two men, with one character very deep, caring, and realistic, and the other shallow, callous, and superficial. Another fascinating aspect was the filmmakers' remarkable exploitation of the general superficiality of the Gay club and drug scenes, especially by the performance of a bodybuilder trick who appears several times in the plot. In many ways this film accurately epitomizes such dysfunctional Gay relationships, managing to do so in a way that has the audience empathizing with the characters. This is not typical Gay film fare - it is not particularly pleasant, but it does ring true to life, which makes it a worthwhile and interesting effort.

Klown
Rating: Outstanding
Genre: Comedy
Denmark (subtitled)

While not a Gay film, this outlandish comedy includes its share of Gay situational plot twists. What's more, the over-the-top sexual humor runs through the entire plot. From adolescent insecurity to middle-aged infidelity, this hilarious Danish film rings the bell over and over with situational gags that never stop. Two longtime middle-aged friends embark on a canoe trip they call 'tour de pussy,' which will include a stop at a one-night-a-year brothel. However, one of them insists on bringing along his essentially kidnapped nephew to prove to his pregnant girlfriend that he can be a responsible father figure. Of course, as the film progresses he proves the exact opposite. Then after the final plot point and resolution, just as the audience expects the film to wind down calmly, it twists into a hysterically funny and unexpected conclusion that not only reinforces the mentality of the lead character, but also flips the outcome on its head. This is undoubtedly the best comedy of SIFF 2012 and probably among the most hilarious films of the past few years. It appears to be slated for a late July release. Don't miss it.

Lost in Paradise
Rating: Very good
Genre: Romantic drama
Vietnam (subtitled)

This interesting film centers on a young man who arrives in Saigon from the countryside only to be robbed of his money and belongings by two male hustlers. As the film progresses, one of the hustlers later meets his victim again and takes him in, which leads to a challenging relationship drama. Parallel to the main plot is a mentally disabled man who raises a pet duckling after incubating the egg on his stomach, while living in destitution and crossing paths repeatedly with a prostitute and her greedy cruel madam and pimp. This is a fascinating film that contains many cultural subtleties that may not be understood by U.S. audiences, but nonetheless it is a sensitive work that attempts to display the human condition of love, sensitivity, and caring while contrasting it with cruelty, indifference, and greed. It does this well, and is another example of why we are so fortunate to be able to view such cinematic gems from around the world through SIFF.

My Brother the Devil
Rating: Average
Genre: Coming-of-age drama
UK

Gangs, guns, and Gays in the ghetto. This pretty well sums up this dark tale of a Middle Eastern family of two sons living in contemporary urban Britain. When the older brother begins to discover who he is sexually, it turns his younger brother against him with disastrous results. This storyline has been done repeatedly through the years, so there is really nothing original in the plot. On the other hand, the performances are solid and realistic throughout the film, leading the audience to empathize with the characters and their dilemmas.

North Sea Texas
Rating: Very good
Genre: Drama
Belgium (subtitled)

Set in the 1960s, this tale of two teenagers, one whose mother is indifferent to him and more interested in her social life as a slutty accordion player, and the other who is a few years older and lives nearby with his mother and younger sister. When the first boy moves in with the second boy's family, sexual/romantic relationships develop and complications ensue. This interesting film takes the audience back to those pre-liberation days with remarkable realism and with solid performances by the entire cast. It is a well-done coming-of-age drama from Belgium, one that highlights the complexity and maturation of Gay cinema in Europe.

Remington and the Curse of the Zombadings
Rating: Average
Genre: Extreme mystery thriller
Philippines (subtitled)

A serial killer is preying on drag queens in a village in the Philippines. Soon we learn that a technological innovation in development that could identify Gay animals for agricultural purposes has been stolen. The 'Gay-dar' gun has a tragic defect - it not only identifies Gays, but it does so by turning them into drag zombies. So who has stolen the Gay-dar gun? The plot is complicated by a curse placed on a kid who screamed 'Homo!' at an angry drag queen in a cemetery - the curse will turn him into a 'homo' when he gets older. When that starts to happen, his mother is the village police officer charged with investigating the homicides. This farcical Gay zombie curse sci-fi flick is really over the top, but does fall short in the end. The funniest scenes center on the teenager, as he unwillingly develops homosexual traits that he cannot control. This silly midnighter does manage to entertain. It is clever and unique, yet its low budget is readily apparent.


Pride Idol: Kyle and Jason ace Wild Card round
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Emeli Sandé's version of events
The singer on her Gay following, Adele comparisons, and going from medicine to music

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Pacific Northwest Ballet scores with joyous Coppélia
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Dallas returns
Desperate Housewives alums Jesse Metcalfe and Brenda Strong talk about their new roles

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The Cabinet's curiosities satisfy taste and tone
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American Idiot is all the rage
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Shear Madness is truly a cut above
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A Dyke About Town: Pearl Django a local treasure
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Copeland works her magic at Jazz Alley
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2012 summer movie preview, part II
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Spellbinding Kingdom a land of inspired plenty
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There's not much alien about Prometheus
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Last call for SIFF 2012: Film festival heads into its final weekend
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Q-Scopes by Jack Fertig
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Chaka Khan performs this weekend at Snoqualmie
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Northwest News
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Letters
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As You Like It is likable, at least
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Exploring the mystique of Matisse
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