Monday, Jan 27, 2020
 
search SGN
SERVING SEATTLE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST FOR 36 YEARS!

click to visit advertiser's website



Last Weeks Edition
   
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
 

 

Speakeasy Speed Test

 
 
click to go to advertisers website
 
Bright Star a sumptuous banquet
Arts & Entertainment
ALL STORIES
  next story
Bright Star a sumptuous banquet

by Rajkhet Dirzhud-Rashid - SGN A&E Writer

Bright Star
Opening September 18


When I tried giving my own presentation of reading Robert Burns' A Red, Red Rose, trying desperately to do an Irish accent in my junior year high school English class, I was met with giggles and some sneers. That put the kibosh on my first attempt to bring others into the warm bath that English literature was for me, and got me more threats of bullying from some of those same classmates.

Ah, but at the ripe age of 53 and a half, sitting with my 54-year-old sweetie (in drag, no less!) in a darkened theater with other critics - some of them maybe with similar geeky histories - watching Bright Star, I felt much vindicated. After all, I might have stopped trying to impress my classmates with my knowledge and love of English poetry, but I did not stop my voracious study of my favorites, the Romantics, including John Keats.

The movie is about Keats (Ben Whishaw), or rather his relationship with his young neighbor, a perky seamstress (sweetly beautiful Abby Cornish), his best friend Brawne (Paul Schneider), and the girl's mom (Kerry Fox), who tries to stop their courtship.

Amid lush landscapes and to-die-for costumes from a much gentler age, Whishaw and Cornish move from being skeptical of the girl's ability to absorb the seriousness of Keats' poetry to an almost obsessive adoration for each other. In the background are Keats' friends and fellow poet/writers and young Fanny's patient, but increasingly alarmed mother and two younger siblings, who often accompany her on sashays into idyllic forest meetings.

As Keats - a poor and malnourished weakling - becomes more and more ill from a journey to London (an attempt by best friend and mother to keep the two lovers apart) without proper weather gear, Fanny becomes more determined that they spend their lives together. Eventually, fate and his illness win, leaving young Fanny devastated after his death in Italy. He leaves his mother, siblings and friends to pick up the pieces of this doomed relationship.

Absolutely the most gloriously romantic film I've ever seen (and, no, I have to admit I didn't see The Piano), this is why we all love director Jane Campion. Her sure vision guides this film in a stately, but accessible way that draws in the viewer and touches the heart so much I'd advise taking along a box of Kleenex, as you're sure to need it - that is, unless poetry bored the hell out of you in school and gothic romance makes you roll your eyes.

Otherwise, grab a sweetie, or just a good friend, and see this sumptuous banquet of a film.

Tell a friend:

Share on Facebook  Share on Facebook

Post to MySpace!Share on MySpace!

    Share on Delicious

Share on StumbleUpon!

Emmy Awards boast tight races, Gay emcee
------------------------------
Hedda Lettuce sure to be delicious at Julia's
------------------------------
Arthur Miller's Creation done right at The Schmee
------------------------------
Confusing Cell Phone still brings the laughs
------------------------------
Stage productions to enjoy this weekend
------------------------------
Get inside the housing bubble in SUBPRIME!
------------------------------
A Dyke About Town: From Patsy Cline to Dave Brubeck
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------
Bright Star a sumptuous banquet
------------------------------
One and Only '50s family melodrama a mixed bag
------------------------------
Characters undefined in visually rapturous 9
------------------------------
COMING IN SEPTEMBER: Pink, Pet Shop Boys, and Seattle's own Pearl Jam
------------------------------
Q-Scopes by Jack Fertig
------------------------------

------------------------------
SGN Exclusive Interview: Mason Jennings writes music from inside out
------------------------------
Northwest News
------------------------------

------------------------------
Town hall rudeness and good times with my slave
------------------------------

------------------------------
Deep Inside Hollywood - Romeo San Vicente
------------------------------

------------------------------
Book Marks
------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

------------------------------

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
Seattle Gay Blog post your own information on
the Seattle Gay Blog
 

 

http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
SGN Calendar For Mobile Phones http://sgn.org/rssCalendarMobile.xml
SGN Calendar http://sgn.org/rssCalendar.xml
copyright Seattle Gay News - DigitalTeamWorks 2009

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News