Friday, Jan 24, 2020
 
search SGN
Friday, Jan 24, 2020
click to go to click to visit advertiser's website


 

 

Speakeasy Speed Test

Cost of the
War in Iraq
(JavaScript Error)
 

 

click to go to advertisers website
 
National News
National News
by Rex Wockner - SGN Contributing Writer

NGLTF analysis of race and the Prop 8 vote stirs controversy
An analysis of the Proposition 8 vote released January 6 by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute said the driving forces behind the California marriage ban's passage were Republican party affiliation, conservative political ideology, frequent church attendance and old age.

But, in its primary focus, the study claimed to "debunk" exit polling that found that 70 percent of black people voted for Proposition 8, saying that the real number was around 58 percent.

The report said 81 percent of Republicans voted for Prop 8, along with 82 percent of conservatives, 70 percent of weekly churchgoers and 67 percent of people over age 65.

The analysis concluded that blacks' heightened religiosity rather than their race per se explained their elevated voting for Prop 8.

The research, by New York University professor Patrick J. Egan and Hunter College professor Kenneth Sherrill, looked at pre- and post-election polls and precinct-level voting data from five California counties with the highest number of black voters.

In an article posted January 7 at the website Box Turtle Bulletin, writer Timothy Kincaid said some of the numbers and methodology of NGLTF's report did not make sense to him, and he accused the organization of being "more of an agent of spin than an advocate for honesty." See tinyurl.com/btb-ngltf.

But Matt Foreman of the Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund, which paid for the study, called Kincaid's article "an unbelievably shoddy job of analyzing the report."

In a comment posted at the site, Foreman said: "The statistical facts speak for themselves: when 'religiosity' (meaning attending worship at least once a week or more) [is taken into account], African Americans were not statistically different from anyone else. White people who attend church at least once a week voted in even higher numbers for Prop 8. The distinction is that African Americans attend worship much more frequently than other people. The fact that so many people automatically defaulted to race is shocking and appalling."

The report did not explain why it is meaningful to distinguish between a race-based voting pattern and a voting pattern tied to race-based religious habits, though Foreman's comments on the website and elsewhere indicate he believes it is improper to cite a race-based voting pattern by itself (i.e., blacks voted for Prop 8 at a level higher than other racial groups did) if the pattern can be explained by race-based religious habits (i.e., blacks voted for Prop 8 at a level higher than other racial groups did because they go to church more often).

Paradoxically, the NGLTF study found that among weekly churchgoers, the percentage of blacks who voted for Prop 8 (66 percent) was actually lower than for whites (70 percent), Latinos (74 percent) or Asians (68 percent). But the authors said these differences were not statistically significant.

The study also found that blacks who do not attend church weekly voted for Prop 8 at a substantially higher level than whites and Asians who do not attend church weekly. Specifically, among voters who do not attend services weekly, the report found that 48 percent of blacks voted for Prop 8 compared with 46 percent of Latinos, 36 percent of whites and 33 percent of Asians. The authors said these differences also were not statistically significant.

Prop 8, which amended the state constitution to re-ban same-sex marriage, passed with 52.3 percent of the vote on November 4. It is being challenged in the state Supreme Court as unconstitutional, with a ruling expected in June.

Barney Frank details congressional Gay agenda
Gay U.S. Rep. Barney Frank said January 12 that three long-delayed pieces of Gay-related legislation likely will pass and become law now that Congress has a Democratic majority and the incoming president is Gay-friendly.

"We're going to do three things in Congress," Frank, D-Mass., told The New Yorker. "First, a hate-crimes bill - that shouldn't be too hard. Next, employment discrimination. We almost got that through before, but now we can win even if we add Transgender protections, which we are going to do. And finally, after the troops get home from Iraq, Gays in the military. The time has come."

Gay mayor takes office in Portland, Ore.
Sam Adams took the oath of office as mayor of Portland, Ore., January 1 at 12:01 a.m., making the city the largest in the country with an openly Gay mayor.

Adams, 45, captured more than 50 percent of the vote in a May 20 primary election that had 13 candidates, thereby avoiding a general-election runoff.

He has promised to make Portland "cleaner, greener, more sustainable, smarter, more equal, better educated."

San Diego is the largest city in America ever to have had an openly Gay mayor.

Toni Atkins held the job for five months in 2005. She was appointed by the City Council after both the mayor and the deputy mayor quit in the wake of a pension-funding debacle.

Ohio Supreme Court upholds Lesbian custody agreement
The Supreme Court of Ohio on Dec. 30 let stand an appeals court ruling affirming the enforceability of a court-approved child custody agreement in a case involving lesbian mothers.

"The court has expressly shut down arguments that Ohio's anti-Gay [marriage] amendment impacts parenting and child custody relationships, rights and responsibilities," said Camilla Taylor, senior staff attorney at Lambda Legal's Midwest office.

Lambda represented Therese Leach in her fight to uphold a custody agreement that she and former partner Denise Fairchild signed in 2001.

Fairchild had argued unsuccessfully in lower courts that Ohio's constitutional amendment limiting marriage to a man and a woman invalidated the agreement.

The Supreme Court refused to review the Ohio Court of Appeals' decision.

Four arrested in California Lesbian rape case
After receiving tips from residents, police in the San Francisco Bay Area city of Richmond arrested two men and two teens January 1 for allegedly raping a Lesbian while making anti-Gay slurs.

Humberto Hernandez Salvador, 31, Josue Gonzalez, 21, and Darrell Hodges, 16, were arraigned in Contra Costa

County Superior Court January 5 and 6 on charges that included carjacking, kidnapping, gang rape and hate crime. The fourth suspect, a 15-year-old, will be tried as a minor.

Bail was set at $2.2 million for Hernandez and $1.85 million for Gonzalez. They could face up to life in prison if found guilty.

The December 13 attack began after the woman got out of her car, which had a rainbow sticker on it. One of the men hit her with an object, ordered her to strip and raped her on the spot, with assistance from the other men, police said.

The woman was then forced into her car and driven to a more remote location, where she was raped inside and outside the car. After about 45 minutes, the assailants left in the victim's vehicle with her wallet, leaving her naked at the scene.

Police had offered an $11,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the alleged attackers. NATIONAL NEWS by Rex Wockner - SGN Contributing Writer

NGLTF analysis of race and the Prop 8 vote stirs controversy
An analysis of the Proposition 8 vote released January 6 by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute said the driving forces behind the California marriage ban's passage were Republican party affiliation, conservative political ideology, frequent church attendance and old age.

But, in its primary focus, the study claimed to "debunk" exit polling that found that 70 percent of black people voted for Proposition 8, saying that the real number was around 58 percent.

The report said 81 percent of Republicans voted for Prop 8, along with 82 percent of conservatives, 70 percent of weekly churchgoers and 67 percent of people over age 65.

The analysis concluded that blacks' heightened religiosity rather than their race per se explained their elevated voting for Prop 8.

The research, by New York University professor Patrick J. Egan and Hunter College professor Kenneth Sherrill, looked at pre- and post-election polls and precinct-level voting data from five California counties with the highest number of black voters.

In an article posted January 7 at the website Box Turtle Bulletin, writer Timothy Kincaid said some of the numbers and methodology of NGLTF's report did not make sense to him, and he accused the organization of being "more of an agent of spin than an advocate for honesty." See tinyurl.com/btb-ngltf.

But Matt Foreman of the Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund, which paid for the study, called Kincaid's article "an unbelievably shoddy job of analyzing the report."

In a comment posted at the site, Foreman said: "The statistical facts speak for themselves: when 'religiosity' (meaning attending worship at least once a week or more) [is taken into account], African Americans were not statistically different from anyone else. White people who attend church at least once a week voted in even higher numbers for Prop 8. The distinction is that African Americans attend worship much more frequently than other people. The fact that so many people automatically defaulted to race is shocking and appalling."

The report did not explain why it is meaningful to distinguish between a race-based voting pattern and a voting pattern tied to race-based religious habits, though Foreman's comments on the website and elsewhere indicate he believes it is improper to cite a race-based voting pattern by itself (i.e., blacks voted for Prop 8 at a level higher than other racial groups did) if the pattern can be explained by race-based religious habits (i.e., blacks voted for Prop 8 at a level higher than other racial groups did because they go to church more often).

Paradoxically, the NGLTF study found that among weekly churchgoers, the percentage of blacks who voted for Prop 8 (66 percent) was actually lower than for whites (70 percent), Latinos (74 percent) or Asians (68 percent). But the authors said these differences were not statistically significant.

The study also found that blacks who do not attend church weekly voted for Prop 8 at a substantially higher level than whites and Asians who do not attend church weekly. Specifically, among voters who do not attend services weekly, the report found that 48 percent of blacks voted for Prop 8 compared with 46 percent of Latinos, 36 percent of whites and 33 percent of Asians. The authors said these differences also were not statistically significant.

Prop 8, which amended the state constitution to re-ban same-sex marriage, passed with 52.3 percent of the vote on November 4. It is being challenged in the state Supreme Court as unconstitutional, with a ruling expected in June.

Barney Frank details congressional Gay agenda
Gay U.S. Rep. Barney Frank said January 12 that three long-delayed pieces of Gay-related legislation likely will pass and become law now that Congress has a Democratic majority and the incoming president is Gay-friendly.

"We're going to do three things in Congress," Frank, D-Mass., told The New Yorker. "First, a hate-crimes bill - that shouldn't be too hard. Next, employment discrimination. We almost got that through before, but now we can win even if we add Transgender protections, which we are going to do. And finally, after the troops get home from Iraq, Gays in the military. The time has come."

Gay mayor takes office in Portland, Ore.
Sam Adams took the oath of office as mayor of Portland, Ore., January 1 at 12:01 a.m., making the city the largest in the country with an openly Gay mayor.

Adams, 45, captured more than 50 percent of the vote in a May 20 primary election that had 13 candidates, thereby avoiding a general-election runoff.

He has promised to make Portland "cleaner, greener, more sustainable, smarter, more equal, better educated."

San Diego is the largest city in America ever to have had an openly Gay mayor.

Toni Atkins held the job for five months in 2005. She was appointed by the City Council after both the mayor and the deputy mayor quit in the wake of a pension-funding debacle.

Ohio Supreme Court upholds Lesbian custody agreement
The Supreme Court of Ohio on Dec. 30 let stand an appeals court ruling affirming the enforceability of a court-approved child custody agreement in a case involving lesbian mothers.

"The court has expressly shut down arguments that Ohio's anti-Gay [marriage] amendment impacts parenting and child custody relationships, rights and responsibilities," said Camilla Taylor, senior staff attorney at Lambda Legal's Midwest office.

Lambda represented Therese Leach in her fight to uphold a custody agreement that she and former partner Denise Fairchild signed in 2001.

Fairchild had argued unsuccessfully in lower courts that Ohio's constitutional amendment limiting marriage to a man and a woman invalidated the agreement.

The Supreme Court refused to review the Ohio Court of Appeals' decision.

Four arrested in California Lesbian rape case
After receiving tips from residents, police in the San Francisco Bay Area city of Richmond arrested two men and two teens January 1 for allegedly raping a Lesbian while making anti-Gay slurs.

Humberto Hernandez Salvador, 31, Josue Gonzalez, 21, and Darrell Hodges, 16, were arraigned in Contra Costa

County Superior Court January 5 and 6 on charges that included carjacking, kidnapping, gang rape and hate crime. The fourth suspect, a 15-year-old, will be tried as a minor.

Bail was set at $2.2 million for Hernandez and $1.85 million for Gonzalez. They could face up to life in prison if found guilty.

The December 13 attack began after the woman got out of her car, which had a rainbow sticker on it. One of the men hit her with an object, ordered her to strip and raped her on the spot, with assistance from the other men, police said.

The woman was then forced into her car and driven to a more remote location, where she was raped inside and outside the car. After about 45 minutes, the assailants left in the victim's vehicle with her wallet, leaving her naked at the scene.

Police had offered an $11,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the alleged attackers.
picture top: Barney Frank
below: Matt Foreman
 

click to visit advertiser's website

click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
click to visit advertiser's website
Seattle Gay Blog post your own information on
the Seattle Gay Blog
 


: http://sgn.org/rss.xml | what is RSS? | Add to Google use Google to set up your RSS feed
copyright Seattle Gay News - DigitalTeamWorks 2008

USA Gay News American News American Gay News USA American Gay News United States American Lesbian News USA American Lesbian News United States USA News